CSN Login
Members Online: 11

The Naturopathic Approach

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

Ladies, I've periodically posted information regarding integrative treatments and maintaining NED with diet, supplements, and lifestyle. My story wasn't very earth shattering, it seemed, because I didn't start posting until I was NED. But my prognosis was very poor, my surgery was suboptimal, and my doctor gave me less than a year. I incorporated integrative therapies during treatment and was NED in March of 2010. I work with a naturopath who put me on a Paleo style diet, prescribed various supplements, and told me I have to exercise and keep my stress level low. I've done those things and this week my CA-125 (a good indicator for me) is 1.
I've discussed my experience in many places in addition to this board. There is a quiet revolution going on on the Inspire - Ovarian Cancer National Alliance Discussion board. Many women are actually going to see naturopaths. The one I work with, who is a 20 year stage IV ovarian cancer survivor, is now booked out into February. She only sees cancer patients. She is seeing women who are NED and keeping them that way. She is seeing women who's CA-125 has not dropped during their most recent chemotherapies, and she is getting it down with Iscador (a mistletoe extract that is widely used in Germany for cancer patients), she is seeing women who were literally on their last legs and now they are having responses to their chemotherapies and are actually feeling pretty good. Although this approach is not widely accepted by the medical community, it is based on science and it is accepted by a few doctors who realize that the conventional approach is just not effective at keeping patients cancer free. Your body was compromised in the first place. Despite what some will say, THAT is why you got cancer. Those who say it is genetic or fate, just don't understand how the human body works. The study of Epigenetics has taught us that gene expression can be managed through diet and lifestyle. My naturopath is living testament that if you get your body healthy, cancer can't grow. She declined surgery and chemo 20 years ago, yet she beat back the cancer with alternatives. She still has a tumor on her liver, but it stays quiet and inactive because her body is healthy. Okay, I'm done preaching now. I am just saddened when I see how some of you suffer and worry about recurrance. There absolutely are proven things you can do to get and stay healthy.

marieinlv
Posts: 40
Joined: Aug 2011

I really appreciate the information on the alternatives. I'm turning my diet around, it helps that my kids can appreciate the affects of poor eating habbits. I love to eat, I like the things we should avoid. My commitment to a healthier diet is growing thanks to encouragement, and the good example you Ladies provide. I have had some pain from surgery and lack of excercise and have found that when i did pilaties that did hurt so good! Really, the major stretching helped alot with the adhesion discomfort. Yes, it hurt the days after, however it WAS worth it. I wish they gave us more physical therapy like pilates after surgery. I believe we would be taking alot less pain relievers. "Be thine own physician?" something like that, of course I believe in Dr.s, but they do need our involvement in treatment. Thanx MUUUCHO for all of the Ladies who spread so much vital information for us all to share.
Marie

2timothy1 7's picture
2timothy1 7
Posts: 337
Joined: Jan 2012

Tethys
I so appreciate your posts. They are a reminder for me to get back on the bandwagon for good eating habits. It is just so hard sometimes with children in the house. However I am making small changes and will continue to try and add to them.

Congrats on your Ca 124 being 1!!!!! I have been to see a naturopath also. I do give myself iscador shots 3 times per week. Dose was just upped last week to 2 mgs each shot now. I have my ca 125 drawn next thurs. In May it was 31. I hope it has went down some because of these shots.

BTY, do you drink grape juice for the resveratrol ? If so what what kind? Also how much exercise do you do and what kind? I read where resistance exercise can help build muscle and decrease estrogen levels. Also what do you eat that is sweet? Also do you agree with the theory that we should keep our body in an alkaline state? I've been trying to eat lemon rinds to help with this. They really aren't that bad.

Thanks so much
Shawnna

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

Shawnna,
You are so wise to work with a naturopath. I'm so glad you have taken that path. I suspect that if the Iscador is working for you, your CA-125 will be much lower now. I'd love to hear what it is when you get your results. There was a woman here to see my naturopath a month, or so, ago. She had completed her chemo, but her CA-125 was 39 on a normal scale of 0-35. She was so disappointed and her doctors said her prognosis was very poor. After three weeks on Iscador, her CA-125 was down to 24. She had also altered her diet, reducing her carbohydrate intake and adding animal protein to her diet.

I don't drink any fruit juice. There are far too many sugars in fruit juices. My naturopath's nutritionist tells me that women should consume only 20 mg of sugar daily, and that includes the sugar content of all foods and liquids ingested. So, not only does that mean that fruit juices are off limits, but also most fruits as well. The only fruit I eat is about a third cup of organic berries. This contains about 5 grams of sugar, therefore 1/4 of my daily intake. All cancers seem to have a close relationship with sugar, but ovarian cancer seems to be more sensitive to sugar than many other types. But even other medical fields are recognizing the detriments of sugar, and I've heard that cardiologists are starting to recommend limiting sugar intake to this amount.

I exercise 3 or 4 times a week, not including walks. Yes, weight training is the best. You should also do sprints every other day or so, with full recovery in between. This, as it turns out, is better for us than aerobic running or biking. There's a really good book on the subject of exercise, "PACE The 12 Minute Fitness Revolution." In the area I live, there are a lot of extreme athletes, runners, bikers, etc. My naturopath has observed that if they are cancer suvivors, who have acheived remission, and they continue to practice extreme exercise, they almost always have a recurrance. So, sprints, walking and weight training seem to be the best choices.

I don't really eat anything sweet anymore. And I was a sweetness addict. The only safe sweeteners are stevia and xylitol. I have essentially adopted a Paleo style diet, minus the honey. My naturopath recommends some form of this diet to all of her ovarian cancer patients. She recognized the benefits of the diet when she started it about a year and a half ago, and her CA-125 has been lower on it than ever before. This diet does not include any grains or beans. Therefore, the only baked goods I have are made with almond meal. I have avoided sweets for so long, that when I make these, I don't add any sweetener, and they are fine for my tastes. I love the book, "Paleo Comfort Foods," for the recipes it contains.

I've worked with two naturopaths and one integrative nurse pracitioner, since my initial diagnosis over three years ago. None of them has given much credence to the alkaline diet. I do think that the ingredients of the alkaline diet are beneficial, but frankly, there is no way you can affect the alkalinity of your body by what you eat. If your blood was not at the proper pH, you would die. If you don't have enough acid in your stomach, you don't digest your food properly and you may end up with acid reflux. So, it doesn't make much sense that you are effectively adjusting your body's acidity by what you eat.

Just a glimpse of what I've learned over the past three years. :)
Take care,

2timothy1 7's picture
2timothy1 7
Posts: 337
Joined: Jan 2012

Thanks for all the advice! Sounds like the answer someone gave me one time when i asked her how she lost so much weight. She said,"Honey, if I put something in my mouth that tastes good, I spit it out." LOL, I loved her answer.

I will check into the Paleo diet. I will also post my ca 125 when I get results next week.

Couple more questions, if you don't mind. I drink green tea and water mostly. What do u drink? Also I eat hormel turkey-- not supposed to have preservatives in it. Do u recommend. Also, just curious, are you in the medical field?

Thanks again and have good weekend
Shawnna

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

Shawnna,
The type of animal protein you eat is pretty critical. Unfortunately, commercially raised animals are subjected to hormones, antibiotics, and a diet cosisting primarily of grains, especially corn. Avoiding the hormones and antibiotics are self explanatory. The problem with a grain diet in animals is that it results in meat high in omega 6s. Too many omega 6s, when comsumed, result in inflammation, which contributes to cancer growth, among other chronic health issues. So, if you're going to eat meat, you really need to rely on grass fed/grass finished, free range, wild game or wild caught fish. If this is just not an option for you, then a diet that is more vegetarian is an alternative. But vegetarian diets get their proteins from things that can be problematic, like grains and beans and soy products, that are just bad news. I would not trust Hormel turkey. I don't know how they raise their birds, but I suspect it is in a commercial setting. Poultry seems to be problematic. There are not a lot of good sources that I have found. But the best source I can find allows you to order it online, from U.S. Wellness Meats: http://www.grasslandbeef.com/StoreFront.bok It's pretty affordable, for good meat, and they ship the orders overnight and frozen, and only charge $7.50 for shipping and handling.
I drink tea and water. Green tea is one of the best. I'm told it is ideal to have 6 to 8 cups of green tea a day, which is more than I tend to drink. So, I've found a green tea extract that I take instead.
Although, I am a scientist, I am not in the medical field. All that I have learned, I've learned from my naturopath, who attends conferences regularly and reads the research on these things all the time, because her well being depends on it. I've also learned things from her husband, who is a biochemist. The two of them are very involved in the care of cancer patients and are actually developing products to benefit them. Soon, hopefully, you will see a product that will take the place of Ensure, that not only contains high amounts of protein, but also various ingredients that will help reduce issues experienced by cancer patients, such as chemo brain. I attended a 5 day workshop last fall, put on by my naturopath, that consisted of information that is beneficial to cancer patients. Plus, I ask her a lot of questions, so have gained a lot of knowlege from her.

2timothy1 7's picture
2timothy1 7
Posts: 337
Joined: Jan 2012

Just wondering if your naturopath puts out newsletters? Would love to be on the email list. Thanks

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

sorry, I didn't see your question about a newsletter. She does not have a newsletter, but there are some pretty interesting audio presentations on her website: http://www.namastehealthcenter.com/resources/presentations.html

2timothy1 7's picture
2timothy1 7
Posts: 337
Joined: Jan 2012

Hey there. Thanks for the link to the audio websites. I've listened to a couple of them. Very informative! I would be curious to know if Amish people have a lower incidence of cancer since they mostly grow their own food. Anyway, I was just wondreing what you eat for breakfast other than country eggs? So trying to adjust, taking baby steps.
Thanks again
Shawnna

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

Normally, I have a smoothie for breakfast: Coconut milk, cultured coconut milk, unsweetened cranberry juice, fresh ground flax and chia seeds, liquid coconut oil, raw cacao, some supplements, a few frozen orgainc berries and a raw egg (the raw egg is not advisable for those in chemo). One day on the weekend, I'll have eggs and nitrate-free bacon. That is an interesting question about the Amish. One would think their incidence of cancer would be lower due to diet and fewer toxic exposures.

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

As my naturopath sees more and more women with ovarian cancer, I see more and more amazing results from her approach. She started working with a woman in mid-October, with mets to her liver that had consumed 80% of that organ. My naturopath was hesitant to do anything extreme with the patient, due to the compromised condition of her body, a result of years of chemo. So, she put her on a strict ketogenic diet, and one month later, her liver is clear of cancer.

Alexandra's picture
Alexandra
Posts: 1263
Joined: Jul 2012

Wonderful advice! What we all need is a lifestyle change.

I recently met with the doctor at the alternative clinic (www.nasriclinic.com).
His ovarian cancer protocol includes: IV therapy (oxigenation, high vitamin C, laetrile B17, Poly MVA, glutathione, amino acids, vitamins and minerals), immune therapy injections (mistletoe, glyoxal), lymphatic massages, acupuncture, colonic therapy, reike, reflexology, biofeedback.
Also supplements such as: AHCC (active hexose correlated compounds), MCP (modified citrus pectin), immunocal, melatonin, vitamin D drops, wobenzyme.

Another alternative clinic I contacted (www.medicorcancer.com) is using Sodium Dichloroacetate (DCA) - a molecule that can't be patented as a cancer drug and is overlooked by big farmaceutical companies, read about it on www.dcacancer.org. Very promising in cancer prevention and treatment, much less damaging to the body than chemo but however causes neuropathy (DCA is to be taken with B1 vitamin for neuropathy)

Not cheap and insurance would not cover any of it. But if you can afford it, why not?

My mainstream oncologist was against mixing these protocols with chemo, but not opposed to doing it after NED for recurrance prevention.

I also wanted to recommend natural "chaga mushroom" supplement virtually unknown in North America, but used for centuries in Russia, China and Japan; tested / approved by government healthcare for multiple cancers in the former Soviet Union in the 50s. It has no side effects and tons of benefits. Read about it on www.chagamushroom.com. I bought chaga extract off www.oriveda.com, it ships from Netherlands, and take mega doses 3 times a day.

And not to forget another natural remedy: cold-pressed flaxseed oil mixed with cottage cheese.
www.cancure.org/budwig_diet

Marnel's picture
Marnel
Posts: 41
Joined: Mar 2012

My naturopath, who only works with cancer patients, recommends making small changes rather than going crazy and quitting everything cold turkey. It will be easier to stick with in the long run. I was so addicted to sugar and he recommended to start by having two servings of protein powder a day(whey protein I add to water) one with breakfast and one with lunch. That alone has helped with my sugar cravings. I also add fish oil from Nordic Naturals to my salads. I hate fish and this has no fishy taste at all but lots of Omega-3. I am trying to move towards a Paleo diet, as well, as this is what my doc recommends. My daughter has Crohns disease and her doctor also recommends the Paleo diet.

Certainly worth checking out.

poopergirl14052's picture
poopergirl14052
Posts: 1179
Joined: Nov 2010

For giving us all hope..you a truly an inspiration..and you do a lot of research and homework. Stay healthy and NED...Val

whiterose
Posts: 89
Joined: Jan 2012

Thanks Tethys. I read your posts about your naturopath about six months ago and booked an appointment. I've been feeling well, and think I'm doing everything I can to protect my health. Chemo can get me into remission, but can't keep me there. I have a team of people I work with-----a gynecologist/oncologist, a medical oncologist, a naturopath, an acupuncturist, a master nutritionist, and a personal trainer. I take about 25-30 supplements a day, work out moderately, eat a mostly Paleo diet, and I've watched my CA-125 plummet. I probably feel better than I have in 20 years. I hope I can keep it that way, and I can't thank you enough for pointing me in the right direction.

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network