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Genetically Modified Food

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Interesting article about research and Monsanto and damage to our kidneys. Please read labels and don't buy anything that has "GMO" (genetically modified) on it. There are plenty of labels with that on it!!

http://redgreenandblue.org/2012/03/14/new-study-monsantos-toxins-kill-human-kidney-cells/

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

Thanks for the info.

I don't think I've seen GMO foods identified on the label. I do see "non-GMO" labels. Maybe I'm just not looking closely enough.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

Thanks, MaryAnn. I did a little digging and found out that canola oil is called a GMO food. I was ready to go throw mine out.....Except that I then read that the way it was "genetically engineered" is the good old-fashioned way ---by breeding different plants to each other, not by modifying the DNA of anything. Monsanto's way is very different and scary.

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 366
Joined: May 2011

I have read about the PLU codes stamps on the products meaning something.
For instance, the code starting with 9 is organic, and with 8 is GMO.
If you Google this, you will find different sides.
Some people say that no one uses any codes starting with 8 because customers with not buy the products; however, I went to COSTCO with my sister last September, and she purchased plums with a PLU level starting with 8.

The bottom line is that if we are concerned about GMO and no one advertises it, then we have to grown our own or buy organic, which is very expensive.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Both my father and father-in-law worked and retired from Monsanto many eons ago. In those days, this company was "good for the community", but today can't say that phrase hold true. Dad was a chemical engineer and today probably rolling in his grave seeing how this company has changed.

Be careful as GMO in many cases isn't identified on labels. As Fayard mentioned, stick with organic or home grown. What has the world come to?

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Monsanto's Bt GMO corn to be sold at Wal-Mart with no indication it is genetically modified
by Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Most of the genetically-modified (GM) corn products forced on American consumers today are hidden in processed foods in the form of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), corn oil, corn starch, and various other corn-based additives. But soon to be available at a Walmart near you is Monsanto's Bt sweet corn, the agri-giant's first ever GM corn product made available to consumers as whole ears right on the cob in the produce section-- and like with all other GMOs, neither Walmart nor Monsanto has any intention of labeling this new "Frankencorn."

Monsanto first unveiled this new variety of GM sweet corn back in August, which rivals Syngenta's GM sweet corn that has already been on the market in limited form for the past ten years, claiming that it would be available to farmers for planting during Fall 2011. Now, the corn appears set to make its debut in Walmart stores across the country as early as Summer 2012, unless massive public outcry is able to convince the multinational retailer to scrap the corn, or at least voluntarily label it.

This disturbing development comes courtesy of both Food & Water Watch and Sum Of Us, which recently drew attention to the issue by creating petitions against Walmart's potential sale of the corn. Though Monsanto's GM sweet corn contains three genetically-engineered (GE) traits that have never been used in food eaten directly by people, and that have never been properly tested, Walmart still intends to quietly stock its produce shelves with this phony corn in the very near future.

Whole Foods and Trader Joe's have rejected Monsanto's Bt corn, how about Wal-Mart?
In a recent campaign alert (http://sumofus.org/campaigns/walmart-monsanto/), Sum Of Us explains that immense consumer pressure has already resulted in commitments from Whole Foods Market, Trader Joe's, and General Mills not to use the new GM corn in any of their products. But as of the announcement, Walmart has made no such commitment, presumably because of the company's close-knit relationship with Monsanto, a "match made in hell" that Food & Water Watch has humorously dubbed "Walsanto" (https://www.facebook.com/WalsantoWatch?sk=info).

But there is still time to stop Walmart's stocking of Monsanto's latest GM poison which, if successful, has the potential to completely destroy the viability of the entire crop. If Walmart rejects the GM corn, many others will likely follow, which will result in farmers refusing to plant it.

It is a simple supply and demand situation, but one that is complicated by the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) refuses to mandate that any GMOs be labeled, which means millions of people consume them all the time without knowing it. This is why YOUR help is needed to spread the truth about both GM sweet corn and GMOs in general to your friends, family members, neighbors, and coworkers.

You can also sign this petition by April 1, 2012, asking Walmart not to stock Monsanto's GM sweet corn:
http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

This is my 3rd attempt to post this. Wondering if there is a conspiracy from Monsanto here.

Thanks for the code info Fayard. I never knew this!!

As far as organic goes, what does that mean? I assume it's food grown without artificial chemicals.

Question: is it possible to have GMO food that is grown organically??? If so, this is scary thought.

Mary Ann

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

NOTE: Paragraph #5......one more reason to stick with Organic.

--------------------
Organic food has become very popular in many parts of the world. As the demand for organic food increases so does the production, but currently the demand still exceeds the supply. What makes organic food so popular?

This guide to navigating the maze of organic food labels, benefits, and claims explores many confusing questions: Is organic food really healthier? Is it more nutritious? Is it better for the environment? What do all the labels mean? Why is it so expensive? How can I afford to buy organic food?

What is organic food?

Making a commitment to healthy eating is a great start towards a healthier life. Beyond eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and good fats, however, there is the question of food safety, nutrition, and sustainability. How foods are grown or raised can impact both your health and the environment. This brings up the questions: What is the difference between organic foods and conventionally grown foods? Is “organic” always best? What about locally grown foods?

What does “organic” mean?

The term “organic” refers to the way agricultural products are grown and processed. Specific requirements must be met and maintained in order for products to be labeled as "organic".

Organic crops must be grown in safe soil, have no modifications, and must remain separate from conventional products. Farmers are not allowed to use synthetic pesticides, bioengineered genes (GMOs), petroleum-based fertilizers, and sewage sludge-based fertilizers.

What are Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are plants or animals whose DNA has been altered. These products have undergone only short-term testing to determine their effects on humans and the environment.

In most countries, organic products do not contain GMOs.

Organic livestock must have access to the outdoors and be given organic feed. They may not be given antibiotics, growth hormones, or any animal-by-products.
Is organic food more nutritious than non-organic food?

The evidence is unclear. Some studies suggest that, on average, organically grown fruits and vegetables may contain slightly higher levels of vitamin C, trace minerals, and antioxidant phytonutrients than conventionally grown produce. However, other studies have found no nutritional differences between organic and non-organic foods.
The benefits of organic food

Organic foods provide a variety of benefits. Some studies show that organic foods have more beneficial nutrients, such as antioxidants, than their conventionally grown counterparts. In addition, people with allergies to foods, chemicals, or preservatives often find their symptoms lessen or go away when they eat only organic foods. In addition:

Organic produce contains fewer pesticides. Pesticides are chemicals such as fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides. These chemicals are widely used in conventional agriculture and residues remain on (and in) the food we eat.

Why do pesticides matter?

Children and fetuses are most vulnerable to pesticide exposure due to their less-developed immune systems and because their bodies and brains are still developing. Exposure at an early age can cause developmental delays, behavioral disorders, and motor dysfunction.
Pregnant women are more vulnerable due to the added stress pesticides put on their already taxed organs. Plus pesticides can be passed from mother to child in the womb, as well as through breast milk. Some exposures can cause delayed effects on the nervous system, even years after the initial exposure.
Most of us have an accumulated build-up of pesticide exposure in our bodies due to numerous years of exposure. This chemical "body burden" as it is medically known could lead to health issues such as headaches, birth defects, and added strain on weakened immune systems.

Organic food is often fresher. Fresh food tastes better. Organic food is usually fresher when eaten because it doesn’t contain preservatives that make it last longer. Organic produce is often (but not always, so watch where it is from) produced on smaller farms near where it is sold.
Organic farming is better for the environment. Organic farming practices reduce pollution (air, water, soil), conserve water, reduce soil erosion, increase soil fertility, and use less energy. In addition, organic farming is better for birds and small animals as chemical pesticides can make it harder for creatures to reproduce and can even kill them. Farming without pesticides is also better for the people who harvest our food.
Organically raised animals are NOT given antibiotics, growth hormones, or fed animal byproducts. The use of antibiotics in conventional meat production helps create antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. This means that when someone gets sick from these strains they will be less responsive to antibiotic treatment. Not feeding animal byproducts to other animals reduces the risk of mad cow disease (BSE). In addition, the animals are given more space to move around and access to the outdoors, both of which help to keep the animals healthy. The more crowded the conditions, the more likely an animal is to get sick.

Organic farming and locally grown produce

Organic farming refers to the agricultural production systems that are used to produce food and fiber. Organic farmers don’t use synthetic pesticides or fertilizers. Instead, they rely on biological diversity in the field to naturally reduce habitat for pest organisms. Organic farmers also purposefully maintain and replenish the fertility of the soil. All kinds of agricultural products are produced organically, including produce, grains, meat, dairy, eggs, fibers such as cotton, flowers, and processed food products.

Essential characteristics of organic systems include:

Design and implementation of an "organic system plan" that describes the practices used in producing crops and livestock products.
Detailed recordkeeping systems that track all products from the field to point of sale.
Maintenance of buffer zones to prevent inadvertent contamination by synthetic farm chemicals from adjacent conventional fields.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

I am often torn between organic produce that has traveled many hundreds of miles for a week since being harvested, versus local produce that is not organic. I usually end up buying local.

I also stand in front of the boxes of eggs and wonder do I get the ones that have more Omega3 or the ones from free-range chickens? It seems that free-range chickens do not lay eggs with more Omega 3!

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I can relate about purchasing organic or local. I just completed a book called COMPLETE IDIOTS GUIDE TO ORGANIC LIVING, Eliza Sarasohn. Such an eye opener on many things that should be healthy and organic.

In reference to eggs, I'll attached a link on what to look for with eggs. Note, even when the cartons claim "cage-free", that doesn't mean the chickens actually left the cage. Many have open cages, but don't venture out, even in the light.

http://cspinet.org/new/pdf/eggchart.pdf

In reference to "organic" produce, they tell us to get most of our produce in organic, as it does have more nutrients. Soil is rich, vs. non-organic soil is used over and over again, whereby all soil richness is gone after multiple uses.

Suggest to stick with a local farmer, as many possibly don't use many pesticides and less expensive vs. national chains. Clip coupons -- organiccoupons.org or grocerycouponguide.com. Try to purchase organic items that ingest most frequently and others non-organic, to save money.

After watching a video the other day on how chickens are treated, I might never eat another egg again....Horrible conditions!

Hugs,
Jan

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 366
Joined: May 2011

Personally, I try my best to buy local organic.
I have read that the more the food travels, the less fresh it becomes.
I am also thinking that if it has to travel long distances, farmers must add something to it to maintain its freshness until reaching destination.

Eve though right now I am eating organic blueberries from Chile,
bottom line line for me is to buy local organic.

Buena suerte!

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I agree, buy local if we can. Now a suggestion which was given to me, during winter months when berries aren't as plentiful, go with frozen organic. These generally aren't from Chile which has more pesticides.

So looking forward to the summer season when we can have fun will all kinds of fresh organic fruits and vegies...yummie!

Hugs,
Jan

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 822
Joined: Sep 2011

Really good artical! We have two acres and use to farm it. Guess we will have to go back and start again. Instead of "A Brave New World"I feel like the large companies are making the earth more like "The Island of DR. Moreau"!

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 1373
Joined: Nov 2009

Jan,

What about GMO seeds? How can we tell if the organic food being grown comes from seeds that have been genetically altered? Wasn't there something called a terminator seed? It can't reproduce and farmers have to buy seeds every year.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

If I read my posting above it reads --

Organic crops must be grown in safe soil, have no modifications, and must remain separate from conventional products. Farmers are not allowed to use synthetic pesticides, bioengineered genes (GMOs), petroleum-based fertilizers, and sewage sludge-based fertilizers.

I'm assuming can't use bioengineered genes (GMO) is seeds, right? We really can't be sure it's not GMO, but they are to follow these policies for using the "organic" label on products.

No clue about terminator seed.....now you're out of my league...need to Google~

We can only assume....
Jan

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