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THE Book List

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

If you like, every time you read a book you find informative or you just liked related to the cancer subject, or health, you just post it here and a bit about it if you don't mind.

That way everytime someone adds something, it will move to the top again.

I'd like to start with this from Kate(tethyis)--"Autoimmune: The Cause and The Cure."

This was an easy starter for me:
Foods to fight cancer : essential foods to help prevent cancer by Béliveau, Richard.

Please know in advance that I thank each and every one of you for your input. I won't make this list longer by thanking each person individually, as books are added.

Susanna23
Posts: 66
Joined: Dec 2010

Very good idea, Claudia
I would like to add 'The Cancer Survivor's Companion' by Dr Frances Goodhart and Lucy Atkins.
This is about the psychological aspects of survival. I found I only needed the chapter on worry/anxiety which I have read several times but there are chapters on anger, fatigue etc which may be very useful to others. Lots of practical advice and exercises in this book and information for family, friends.
Best regards
Susan (London, UK)

HellieC's picture
HellieC
Posts: 460
Joined: Nov 2010

Anticancer - a new way of life, by Dr David Servan-Schreiber.

A most positive and uplifting book, full of good information about cancer fighting foods, lifestyle etc. Dr Servan-Schreiber managed to hold an aggressive brain tumour at bay for many years. Sadly he died a few months ago, but this book is his legacy. I would recommend it to all who want to make dietary changes to their lives as a result of a cancer diagnosis.

Helen

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

FOODS TO FIGHT CANCER, Richard Beliveau PhD

Categorized foods which help prevent cancer. Essential guidelines on how to included these healing foods in your diet.

COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO ORGANIC LIVING, Eliza Sarasohn

We all know going organic is good for our health, less toxins. Expert insights from nutritionists, food scientists and others who support an organic way of life.

I list the last one, as we all are great with our foods, but how about our toxins in our home cleaning products, cosmetics, soil and even the furniture fabrics. Remember our skin absorb most of what we put on it, including the laundry detergent we use on our clothing, then wear these clothes.

HAPPY READING...
Jan
eo to

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

"Lights Out" by T.S. Wiley
Based on research conducted at the National Intitute of Health, discusses the flaws in our modern lifestyle and how we are not adapted to suvive them. There is a chapter on cancer, while an interesting perspective, I'm still not in the author's camp. A rather dramatic journalistic writing style, but full of information that is mind boggling.

"Embrace, Release, Heal" by Leigh Fortson
The story of the author's three experiences with cancer and the conventional treatment and alternative treatment she used to acheive remission. Contains numerous survivor stories and the alternative methods, mind body and spirit, they used to acheive long term survival. Interviews with the practitioners who helped these patients and contact information for various clinics and practitioners.

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

I recommend "Zapped" by Louise Gittleman, which surveys the hazards of our modern electronic life, its effects on our metabolic processes, its dimunition of melatonin secretion. The author provides concrete recommendations for minimizing exposure to cell phone and WIFI exposure. As she is a nutritionist, her last chapter lists FOODS high in nutrients that help to protect against these exposures when we cannot avoid them.

I was also impressed by "Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients" by Dr. Russell Blaylock, long a neurosurgeon who eventually shifted his research interests to cancer and nutrition.
At worst, his book might be a bit too detailed for some of us--and his warnings about many animal products and even the aminio acid methione might make us feel a bit paranoid. More optimistically, certain nutrients can help to prevent and even reverse many tumors, mitigate the effects of chemo and radiation (he provides very specific examples, all footnoted with citations of clinical studies), and most intriguingly, make chemo and radiation more EFFECTIVE, helping to prevent chemo-resistance.

So far the most comprehensively helpful and interesting book has been "Life Over Cancer" by Dr. Keith Block, who, eminent in the field of integrative oncology, runs the prestigious Block Clinic in Illinois. In no other text did I find such interesting insights into what blood tests we need to monitor our "terrain" (body chemisty); what supplements and nutrients help to modify that "terrain"; what is meant by blood thinness versus stickiness; and what fine tunings of the administration of chemo can make chemo more effective and less toxic.

Rosey

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

'How and When to Be Your Own Doctor'
by Dr. Isabelle A. Moser with Steve Solomon

This book was written to help educate the general public about the virtues of natural medicine and to encourage the next generation of natural healers.

You can read this book free on line:
http://chestofbooks.com/health/Isabelle-A-Moser/How-and-When-to-Be-Your-Own-Doctor/index.html

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

GETTING WELL AGAIN by O. Carl Simonton talks of mind body connection and teaches how cancer patients can contribute to their healing and to STAY healthy.

CD set: GUIDED IMAGERY by Andrew Weil, MD and Martin Rossman, MD. both integrative physicians who train doctors. Talk about the value of guided imagery and teach 3 different sessions.

Tresia23's picture
Tresia23
Posts: 75
Joined: Dec 2010

Thank you Claudia for starting this up. With so many thoughtful and intelligent women on this discussion board it will be a great resource. I specially like the commentary. I am looking forward to reading.

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 795
Joined: Sep 2011

Can anyone suggest a REALLY good book(or chapters in a book) for terrible anger, depression, and anxiety? I've got a ton of all three, especially anger?

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

I'm so sorry to hear how much stress you're feeling and can only imagine some of their causes. (My sister in law, by the way, a breast cancer survivor, reports that although she worries about recurrence, my brother tends to minimize the chance and essentially to adopt a position of denial. Denial is often how males, in particular, cope with bad news but suspect that could cause some resentment unless one understands that it's sometimes so hard for a family to adopt a different stance.

I myself have been supported by several friends since diagnosis but hurt by a few acquaintances who as colleagues never even sent an email saying "So sorry to hear ..." These were not close friends, but people I had socialized with, whose home I had been to, whom I had attended concerts with just a year prior. In occasional bad moods I dwell on slights such as these; in better ones I can feel forgiving and transcend them and know that's better for my immune system.

You might scroll back to an interesting message sent via another thread--by a member of our board who is doing "Tong ren" therapy. Her leader had interesting insights into anger.

I suspect that Tai Chi would be a really good form of exercise for anyone dealing with a lot of fear and anger, for it "opens us up" and gets energy and breath flowing; in negative states, we tend to hold our breath.

If I run into a psychological book that would help, will definitely let you know.

In the meantime, empathy.

Hugs,
Rosey

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I hear you with the anger and any other negative emotion. One of the valuable things I got from Simonton's book, Getting Well Again, was that I was able to identify the negative emotions that probably contributed to my cancer. He guides the reader in this process AND he instructs us to process these with a therapist.

I followed instructions to the letter and discussed my findings with a good therapist. I found this profoundly informational and transformational.

There may not be a BOOK that would substitute for a LIVE INTERPERSONAL connection. I strongly suggest that you consider a therapist - a licensed social worker is the best in my opinion.

Hugs, Mary Ann

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 795
Joined: Sep 2011

Thanks Rosey and all the rest...I do need therepy and anger management. I get the men and their attitude to denial, we would all like to hide from this! I, too, have lost friends over this, almost as if I have already died, which was hurtful. But my husbands attitude has been the worse. He told me I "needed to get over myself" that I had had the surgery, chemo, and radiation and "it was a done deal" so move on. I had the same attitude with two of my other children, one of whom is a RN. Thanks for letting me have my "pitty-party"! Debrajo

Tresia23's picture
Tresia23
Posts: 75
Joined: Dec 2010

Hi, I think Mary Ann's advice is very sound. You can read all the books (you mention you have a ton), but it is also helpful to have a guide in the form of a therapist. Two books I have found really helpful for dealing with feelings such as anger, are 'The Mindful Way through Depression' Guilford Press, authors Williams, Teasdale, Segal and Kabat-Zinn. The other one which I use often and have also downloaded practices onto my ipod, is 'The mindful path to self-compassion' by Christopher Germer. I have been learning with the help of my therapist and lots of reading, that bodily sensations will let you know that a 'feeling' is happening. Learning then to be aware of this and accepting it, acknowledging it can be healing. It is when we block those feelings that anger rises and takes over. Sometimes we need to put a hand over our heart and just comfort ourselves for this difficult emotion. Acknowledging the feeling will get you at least half way, but a therapist will keep you moving in the right direction. Warm regards,

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Tresia, you made me think of Tolle's "The New Earth" where he helps the reader learn to be more AWARE of things that are happening to and around him/her and step back from them and be an OBSERVER before being a REACTOR.

Another good read.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

This kind of therapy sounds interesting to me. Has anyone gone to a therapist who practices this kind of cognitive therapy?

Tresia23's picture
Tresia23
Posts: 75
Joined: Dec 2010

Hi JoAnn, I found my psychotherapist by doing a search here in Australia on a website called goodtherapy.com Not sure if there is an equivalent over there. It gives a good description of how the therapist works and what sort of modalities or combination of theories they utilise in working with clients. I had already had some experience with a Buddhist psychologist who was part of the health service where I was employed. Learned a bit about Martha Linehan and then did some basic mindfulness practices which I kept on with after staff training he conducted for clinicians. Did some further sessions with him, then went on a Vipassana retreat. This was way before I was diagnosed with endometrial cancer. I was recovering I guess from death of my husband and trying to deal with grief issues. The book and practices I like best can be found at Christopher Germer's website which has some good links to mindfulness practice and lots of articles http://www.mindfulselfcompassion.org/

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

People who have never faced death or a frightening experience like cancer JUST DON'T GET IT!!! Your feelings are understandable. We can let those faux "friends" go but we are stuck with our relatives. Couples and family therapy is also an option. And, of course, this forum is here too.

I hope you are able to find a way to let go of all negative emotions. Resentments will keep us sick. Not an easy task but recognizing and asking for help are steps in the right direction.

Wishing you endless blessings and joy. Mary Ann

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

After reading Debrajo's post, I wonder why we have not spent more time discussing this lack of understanding and support from family and friends.

My former best friend, whom I met and befriended about 37 years ago, wanted so badly for me to return to exactly the life I lived pre-cancer diagnosis and treatment. About two weeks after my last treatment, when I was obviously still tired and having certain treatment side effects, he wanted me to attend a dinner party that was an hour and a half away, started at 9, and would get me home at about 2 a.m. Initially I declined the invitation, but he tormented me by saying that I had "cancer head" and could not continue to live in fear; ultimately, I attended the dinner and had to recuperate for days afterwards. In the following months, he continued to be so angry at the fact that I now eat dinner at 6, not 9; do not go to gatherings that start late; and watch what I eat and drink. He exploded one day and said the if he were to write my biography he would call it "Jill: A Fearful Life."

After 37 years, I ended our friendship a year and a half ago. He has tried to contact me multiple times, and despite our long history, I DO NOT need such lack of support. I realize that it makes HIM feel better to deny what I went through, and he wants his life--and our friendship--to be exactly as it was. Not a chance!

I'm not suggesting that this should be the approach for every relationship in which we feel a lack of support. Some of our close friends and family can generally reach a better understanding, or we can come to places like this board and get much of the support that we might need. NO ONE ELSE understands the impact of our cancer diagnosis better than others who are going through the same thing.

I've been angry, but I am fortunate to have other friends who were/are amazingly supportive; and I have made new friends whom I have come to cherish. Anyway, this is my rant. Let it out here, Debrajo and anyone else who suffers from lack of support; we are here for you.

Thanks, everyone.

Jill

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 795
Joined: Sep 2011

You were brave, Rewriter, to let go of this long-time friend! I have been "let go" by some friends so I didn't have to make that hard decision! My mother (who is almost 87 and a 26 year surviver of Breast cancer)always told me that life is a learning-growing experence. I think a lot of us have "out-Grown" some of our old friends (and old habits) and have grown in a different direction. Thanks all of you for my "summer reading material"! and I think I will re-read "When bad things happen to good people" It helped a lot after the death of one of my sons. A little "Chicken Soup for The Cancer Survivor Soul" wouldn't hurt!

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