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Opinions on High Protein Diets

LISAinTN's picture
LISAinTN
Posts: 143
Joined: Aug 2011

Hey Everyone,

I've been reading all these posts about how healthy everyone is eating. I have been the exact opposite. Since my cancer surgery, I have gained weight and can't seem to get a handle on it. I keep thinking that I received a second chance and should take better care of myself, but I think I have been too stressed out by the events of the last 7 months. I also have chronic Fibromyalgia which makes it so hard to exercise the way one would need to, to drop weight. I have had much success in the past with a high protein/low carb/low fat diet. The weight comes off quickly, without having to kill myself with exercise and that's what I feel I need to do. My doctor said he had no concerns about any kind of diet I wanted to follow, but sometimes I find these doctor's only know about surgery, tumors, etc and don't really know much about natural practices, nutrition, etc.

My tumor was small, they only removed part of my kidney and they say they got it all, so my question is: What is your opinion of a very high protein diet for 4-5 months time if I then switched over to a diet that included more of all the good food groups, smoothies and all of that? Just wondering if I'm going to bring my cancer back by going with high protein for a few months. Thanks.

Blessings,
Lisa

Minnesota Girl's picture
Minnesota Girl
Posts: 115
Joined: Jul 2011

Lisa -

I empathize with you. Before I got sick, I lost about 10 pounds on Nutrisystem, which exactly what you are talking about (high protein/low fat/low carb). In the first few months I was back at work (eating all the treats but still being too exhausted to do anything) I gained all that weight back.

I thought about going back to Nutrisystem, but I didn't want the super charged protein. It's not so much a worry that the protein will bring your cancer back, but your kidneys help break down protein, so a high protein diet can be hard on them. While my doctors haven't given me any specific limitations, I have a friend who is a Nephrologist and he said if I go easy on salt and protein, it will be a little easier on my remaining kidney.

I have successfully lost 20 pounds since Thanksgiving on a program through our local hospital - it's all based on "Healthy Weight Loss." I've had to change my diet and really exercise to do it. Maybe you can find classes in a warm water pool? Any activity you can get in is better than none. Plus, cardio is good for your heart and can help keep your blood pressure healthy - also good for your kidneys. :)

LISAinTN's picture
LISAinTN
Posts: 143
Joined: Aug 2011

Hi MNGirl,

Thanks for the reply. Every time I read your user name, I chuckle because I feel like I should change mine to FormerMNGirl. lol Congrats to you and your great progress. I am so happy for you.

Swimming in a pool would be great for me, but unfortunately, I live in the boonies and there's nothing like that around here unless I drive about 45 minutes one way. I did get out and start walking with my dog again yesterday. Only 15 minutes at a time to start, but with FMS, I just can't over do it. I'm thinking of doing the high protein for a short stint to get the weight off and then I can switch over to something more healthy. I'm not really sure if high protein would even be an issue for me, but I just don't want to take the chance, long term. Thanks again for the reply and keep up the great work!

Blessings,
Lisa

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Hi Lisa,
The first thing my urologist warned me about after surgery was high protein diets. From what I have read, the reason to abstain is not necessarily to prevent another bout of kidney cancer but we need to avoid them in case the remaining kidney isn't functioning up to par, i.e., it's not filtering protein waste efficiently. The restriction seems to be more for the chronic kidney disease patient. Evidently, people with two properly functioning kidneys can handle short-term high-protein diets pretty well, but even they are advised not to follow one for too long. Me? I was never a big protein guy. I ate meat maybe three times a week. My problem area is carbs, which make up most of my diet. Not a good thing either, I know, but I'm kind of set in my ways and since the surgery my pre-diabetic blood tests (115-125) have decreased to the low 90s and I have been taken off of blood pressure medication after cutting back on salt. So I must be doing something right.
Mike

LISAinTN's picture
LISAinTN
Posts: 143
Joined: Aug 2011

Hi Mike,

I've never been a huge meat person either, but carbs don't like me. I always say I can just look at a picture of a dessert in a magazine and gain 10 lbs. LOL I think I may just do it for the short term and then get back to something healthier.

Hey, that is SO awesome about your test numbers! Way to go! You absolutely must be doing something right. Thanks again for the reply and have a great week!

Blessings,
Lisa

garym's picture
garym
Posts: 1651
Joined: Nov 2009

Hi Lisa,

You have the advantage of two kidneys (one a bit smaller than the other) over those of us with only one so short term high protein should not be as big a risk, but use caution anyway. I was on a high protein low fat diet for several months prior to dx and it worked very well for me too, post-op I have found that watching my sodium intake works well for me. My main form of exercise (other than the 12oz curl) is walking, I don't know much about Fibromyalgia, but perhaps walking would work for you.

Blessings back atcha,

Gary

LISAinTN's picture
LISAinTN
Posts: 143
Joined: Aug 2011

Hi Gary,

Thanks for the reply. I like to do 12 oz. curls as well. LOL You are so funny.

I think I'm going to try the high protein again for a short stint. It's just the only thing that really worked for me. It can't be any worse then sitting here eating like I have been lately. Must find a different way to deal with the stress.

Walking is actually good for Fibro and I started yesterday again taking my dog for a walk. Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder so it just makes it so hard to do anything. My body is so wracked with pain from my neck to my feet that it's a struggle to get out of bed in the mornings. It also causes terrible insomnia so I never get into that deep REM sleep so that my body can restore itself and the muscles, joint, tendons, etc. Thus the reason for the pain and it's just a vicious cycle. I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy, BUT I do get out of bed every morning and I get going and get things done because I am not the type to sit around and do nothing or watch everyone else get things taken care of. Life goes on.......Anyway, thanks again for the reply. And thanks for the blessings. :o)

Blessings,

Lisa

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Lisa, at the risk of getting you to look at material which is all old hat to you, you may care to take a glance at this in case it contains something worth exploring:

http://www.webmd.boots.com/vitamins-and-minerals/fibromyalgia-herbs-and-supplements

My apologies if it doesn't prove of any use.

myboys2's picture
myboys2
Posts: 50
Joined: Nov 2011

I read 2 interesting books on diet recently, the China Study and Eat 4 your type. They were both interesting and it would appear that the diet that my son is eating was the right one for o+. I also have eaten his diet in support and lost all 18 pounds I needed to and remain that way. Just a thought.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Gail, it's several years since I was reading D'adamo but his theory struck me (after initially thinking it the work of a crank) as inherently highly plausible. For most of my life I've been fascinated by the complexity of the human body and the ramifications of the biochemical individuality that is so evident. I was intrigued by some of the work of an early luminary in the immunology field - Arthur Coca.

Anyway, on first encountering D'adamo's books, I figured that it would be surprising if our blood type did not interact with the chemistry of what we ingest. After all, differences in blood chemistry are hugely important. For instance, I am a 'universal donor' which makes my blood particularly valuable socially (apart from being fairly important to me!). When I go under the knife on 30th March, it will be crucial to have blood of only my type available for any transfusions I may need because if I were given blood of any other group it would almost certainly kill me. The other obvious example is the Rhesus Factor - blue babies and so on.

I must revisit D'adamo. Your posting led me to look at a site by some enthusiast in New Zealand which contains an (unattributed) table which suggests that with my blood type I would have a tough digestive tract, strong immune system and a predilection for intense exercise, all of which is spot on. The rest of it I'm not as sure about. It also led me on to, ultimately The Weston A. Price Foundation which sounds like a collection of dangerous lunatics. They seem to have totally conflicting policies but appear keen to promote eating as much saturated animal fats as you can. They also advocate reducing your phytic acid intake by all means possible as being a dangerous anti-nutrient. Interestingly, this is another name for IP6, the anti-cancer and numerous other benefits of which I have just been exploring as a result of Olsera's question on the thread "are natural remedies snake oil or promising?"

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