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Lost in translation

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

Some of you know I have moved from the US to Denmark. I have not been here a month. I am set up as a resident so I have access to the health system.

I got referred to the gyn for cervical cancer....an error of course. The cervical cancer dept sent me a letter that referred me back to my doctor for labs confirming the diagnosis. I called said dept and advised it was OVC. I told them I already had all the labs, scans, treatment..etc documented for OVC. I just needed to know where I was supposed to go or which was the right dept to be referred to.

The cervical cancer people told me they do not deal with ovaries so I should go back to the assigned GP for the correct referral. OK, so since I was speaking to the gyn dept, I asked, "Ok which dept deals with ovaries?" They did not know go back to GP.

Great so I call the number on the back of the insurance card and tell them my story. Once I finish the lady tells me, this line is for Danish people who have had emergencies outside of Denmark and need care. But she was nice enough to repeat go back to GP for referral to gyn dept. I explained the run around and she said not much to do but go back for GP and hope for a correct referral.

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

I was literally lost in translation. Apparently the first letter was a form letter sent out so patients do not panic...or an outright mistake. I got the second mailing about my referral. I am currently trying to translate it....migraine setting in....but it does say I have an appointment scheduled with the major cancer clinic. It even has information on the research available. I just have to work on translating that portion.

AnneBehymer's picture
AnneBehymer
Posts: 739
Joined: Jul 2011

all I can say to that is wow good luck and I hope it gets easier

Anne

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

Thank you...it will get easier...just have to have patience...which I am low on. ;p

kayandok
Posts: 1223
Joined: Jun 2008

I hate getting the runaround treatment! You certainly don't need this, on top of all the other adjustments you must be having. Keep us posted and keep pushing forward until they listen to you.

Don't know anything about Denmark, but worked with a Danish lady for many years. Her name was Dora, and she never listened, only talked. But, she was very sweet! Needless to say, I was very frustrated. I thought about Dora for he first time in many years, when I read your post.

Hugs to you Radio!
kathleen

PS Why are you in Denmark? Maybe you already posted earlier, and I missed it?

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

I am in Denmark because my husband got a job here. He had been looking for one for well over 2 years. We could not pass this up, even though it came at the time of OVC diagnosis. He left and my family took care of me, until I could get here.

I am having to start all over again with the treatment or at least until someone can review my history. Then they should push me forward to the right department. From what I have heard...they talk a lot because the langauge is super large. I am taking classes for the language and the words are superlong....sometimes it takes a lot to say a little.

Not unlike the "ants" in The Lord of the Rings.

Thanks for the hugs :)

kimberly sue 63's picture
kimberly sue 63
Posts: 408
Joined: Apr 2012

Danish is hard to learn. I know very little and when we visit it is always hard because everyone starts in English and then finishes in Danish. I can usually get the topic of conversation when listening, but I never really can participate in the Danish conversation. Just know most Danes know English unless they are elderly.

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

I am in Denmark because my husband got a job here. He had been looking for one for well over 2 years. We could not pass this up, even though it came at the time of OVC diagnosis. He left and my family took care of me, until I could get here.

I am having to start all over again with the treatment or at least until someone can review my history. Then they should push me forward to the right department. From what I have heard...they talk a lot because the langauge is super large. I am taking classes for the language and the words are superlong....sometimes it takes a lot to say a little.

Not unlike the "ants" in The Lord of the Rings.

Thanks for the hugs :)

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

So, Radioactive, have you finally gotten referred to the ovary department? Please keep us updated.

I find your posts so interesting even though you are dealing with a lot of garbage. I hope things have improved for you.

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

The initial appointment is not until late February. Sigh, I am not being monitored until then. So...anxiety varies because no CA 125 but then again no CA 125 to necesairly worry about...the paradox..of do I really want to know?

I cling to the healthier eating and exercise as security blankets. Maybe they will keep the monster at bay.

Radioactive34's picture
Radioactive34
Posts: 387
Joined: May 2011

They did not know what to do with my type of cancer. I gave them the report from Harvard and the oncologist who treated me. That still did not give them a clue where to stick me. So, I ended up in the female and brain cancer section of the oncology department.

Either way, they understood small cell cancers required constant monitoring. I am going to have a CT and blood work next week. Then for the next few years a CT every 4 months. Language was an issue, but a nurse liason helped.

This feels like getting a car serviced. The break specialist will only touch the break. The muffler shop only the mufflers....etc.

They said they were a highly specialized department and could only deal with the treatment of cancer. I asked for a referal to a shrink who dealt with people with cancer diagnosis. They looked at me like a nut and said they did not do that type of thing. They referred me to a website which might help me.

Either way things are looking up.

kikz's picture
kikz
Posts: 1284
Joined: Jun 2010

are looking up for you. I can't imagine going through this is a foreign country although most of what we go through is so foreign. Do you have friends or family there?

Karen

Mwee's picture
Mwee
Posts: 1316
Joined: Nov 2009

Will they be honoring a guarantee like my local muffler shop :)
(((HUGS))) Maria

JoWin615's picture
JoWin615
Posts: 142
Joined: Feb 2011

LOL, Maria!

kimberly sue 63's picture
kimberly sue 63
Posts: 408
Joined: Apr 2012

What a coincidence...My husband is Danish. I met him after he was in the states 1 year. That was almost 28 years ago. His whole family lives in Denmark and my youngest daughter who is 18, has lived there for two years.

What part of Denmark are you in? My husband's family lives on FYN. If you are close, I could link you with one of his sisters who is a nurse.

JoWin615's picture
JoWin615
Posts: 142
Joined: Feb 2011

I lived in Germany for two years and my first child was born there. We were not in the military. My (ex) husband is German, and he stopped speaking English to me the minute we stepped off the plane. I learned German quickly, but it was difficult and exhausting. I cannot imagine doing that and having ovarian cancer at the same time - I salute your strength and courage!

Cheers,
Jo

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