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Non smoker-non drinker issue

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Hi all,

I am very curious about this subject ''non smoker-social drinker issue''.

How come you develop mouth cancer after quiting smoking since 2005?
How long does it take for cancer to develop even if you quit smoking yrs ago?

My partner quit smoking as mentioned. She still has a drink now and then but can it cause mouth cancer as well...even after quiting smoking? We like social drinks but not excessively.

She saw 3 doctors so far and none of them mentionned alcohol. They ask about the smoking part but barely. I had to ask the questions. It was as if none of those issues mattered.

Take care, Sue

fisrpotpe's picture
fisrpotpe
Posts: 1338
Joined: Aug 2010

to me being a drinker was part of spending alot of time in the bar's that used to have alot of smoke. so the drinking part brought you closer to the smoke. i was neither a smoker, drinker or 55. that was almost 16 years ago. being 55 meant you spent more time in the smoke.

john

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Hi John. What is 55? You were in a bar but didn't drink. Not sure I am reading well. Sorry. Sue

fisrpotpe's picture
fisrpotpe
Posts: 1338
Joined: Aug 2010

they told me i had to be 55 years old, a smoker and drinker to get what i had, guess i was just unlucky. I drank alot until i was 20 or so and after that hardly at all. I was 38 when I was diagnosed (1996). back then there was very little knowledge of my cancer was nothing on the internet back then.
sure wish i had this CSN site back then.
John

fisrpotpe's picture
fisrpotpe
Posts: 1338
Joined: Aug 2010

they told me i had to be 55 years old, a smoker and drinker to get what i had, guess i was just unlucky. I drank alot until i was 20 or so and after that hardly at all. I was 38 when I was diagnosed (1996). back then there was very little knowledge of my cancer was nothing on the internet back then.
sure wish i had this CSN site back then.
John

Ed_PortOrange's picture
Ed_PortOrange
Posts: 110
Joined: Jun 2010

That's what makes this desease so difficult to cure. They can attribute some cancers to the environment that you've been in but not in all cases. As a smoker for 1 year way back in 1967 I doubt mine was smoke related. Sure I've been in smokey places (a bar/bowling alley or two)over the years, but not for the past 10-15 years. Drinking could be a cause, I was more of a binge drinker, might not have a beer but once or twice a week but it usually turned into a six pack BSing with friends.

We all have cancer cells in our bodies, we need to identify the trigger. There are thousands of scientists researching this beast and it's baffling that they have not found a specific (blood deficiency?)cause. They have developed treatments but not the elimination of the cause.

Scratching my head.......

Ed

osmotar's picture
osmotar
Posts: 954
Joined: Jul 2011

Hi Sue,

I am also a non smoker - non drinker. Parents smoked, I tended bar part time for about 2 years but all of this was a good 15 plus years ago, yet I ended up w/ rt tonsil cancer, that went to 1 lymph node. After the tonsil was removed I asked my ent how I could have gotten this, he said if I was a smoker, drinker, combinatiom of both he would say that was the cause. He didn't say nor was I even aware to ask about HPV, so I can't say that as the root cause or that he even checked for that in the removed tonsil. All he did say was that I was in that small percentage of " we don't know", not comforting , but as someone in this post said about cancer cells I too believe we all have them , we just don't know what triggers them.

Happy Holidyas

Linda

jtl's picture
jtl
Posts: 420
Joined: Sep 2011

Smoking and drinking irrates the lining of the mouth and throat and can eventually cause changes in the cells and their DNA. Some people are more susceptable than others or everyone who smokes and drinks who have scchn which is obviously not the case. From what I have read smoking is much worse as a cause of scchn but adding alchohol to the equation makes it even worse. Quiting lowers the odds signicantly as I posted in another thread but it still takes up to 20 years to get get back to the odds of the never smoked population. Smokeless tobacco is also a problem.

I don't know if everyone has cancer in the strict sense but since cancer is caused by a change in how normal cells divide and die it certainly is possible that some people have better checks and balances than others. I personally think that an awful lot of cancers are caused by environmental factors including the foods we eat. Also, people are living a lot longer giving diseases more time to appear.

Bigfuzzydoug's picture
Bigfuzzydoug
Posts: 154
Joined: Jul 2010

How do you know your partner only just developed cancer now, 6 years after quitting smoking? How do you know she didn't have cancer 6 years ago, but had no indication or reason to suspect it? No one goes for a periodic PET Scan and even then, it might not be detected if the mass isn't big enough. My point is, how did she know something was wrong to get tested? Can you prove that she DIDN'T have cancer 6 years ago?

Cancers can be very slow growing. My grandfather smoked for many many years. When he was in his 80's he was diagnosed and treated for rheumatoid arthritis. But an Oncologist also took at a look at him. "You don't have arthritis, you have cancer. It's lung cancer and it's metasticized everywhere throughout your body. You've probably had it for the past 20 years and never known it until you staretd feeling pain in your joints.

My case was the opposite. I felt something in my throat, went and got it checked out 2 days later and found a 5mm cyst. Had it removed 5 weeks later, but by then it had grown 600% to 3cm and was malignant. Very fast growing.

As for the alcohol - HEAVY drinkers, alcoholics are at risk for Barrett's Esophogus and other forms of mouth and throat cancers from the constant burning of the lining of their throat from all the drinking. The body changes to try and make more cells in the tissue linings and you wind up with screwy gentic code which can lead to squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth, throat, esphogus and stomach. But that's with heavy drinkers. Light social drinkers have no known related correlation.

There's also acid reflux (same reasons as the alcoholism) and HPV 16 & 18 which can be known causes of head and neck cancer.

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Very interesting Bigfuzzydoug. Tks for the info.

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Yes it seems like a mystery on how we get cancer......unless you are a heavy smoker and heavy drinker then it would be almost clear. But when you are not???

Tks for all of your input people. Sue

sweetblood22's picture
sweetblood22
Posts: 3230
Joined: Jan 2010

Think about how many cells are in your body.  These cells normally grow and divide in a controlled way to produce more cells as they are needed to keep you alive and healthy.  When cells become old or damaged, they die and then they  are replaced with new cells.

There are times when this all goes wrong. The genetic material (DNA) of a cell can become damaged or changed, things like smoking and alcohol, chemicals, or HPV, can produce mutations that affect normal cell growth and division. When this happens, cells do not die when they should and new cells form when the body does not need them. The extra cells may form a mass of tissue, a tumor.  Not only can DNA change, and run amok in a bad way, but it can change, or mutate, in a good way.  One of the Fanconi Anemia lead researchers, explained that one of the reasons, I have not had bone marrow failure yet, could be that I am a somatic mosaic.   The blood part of me, the DNA may have righted itself, while the mucosa, has not.  Thus my extreme high risk, and rate of HNC in FA patients.   When I was diagnosed and spoke to some of the people at Rockefeller University, and Cornell, that deal with my blood disorder, FA, they told me that there are FA patients that are 20 years old, that have never smoked, or drank, and have gotten HNC.  They don't even want FA patients to use mouthwash with alcohol in it.  

So, exposure to something like just the alcohol in mouthwash, in some one predisposed genetically to cancer, is bad, never mind any other of the many other carcinogens there are.  

If a person drank or smoked in the past, the risk of cancer, will come down with time, but I don't think it ever really goes away.    In my case, I did drink some, and smoke some, but I think because of my other genetic illness, cancer was almost a given, if I didn't die of bone marrow failure first.   

Cancer can be super slow growing, or the seed, (the damage from years past) can be planted, and only to take root years later and grow.  My tumor got pretty darn big, pretty quickly.  I found my swollen lymph node on October 9th and by December it was the size of a large lemon.   8-/   They never found my primary.  

I have to say that for me, I never wonder about the 'whys' of people's cancer diagnosis.  I guess I have just seen so many young people struck down with cancer, and unfortunately, not make it, I just think that cancer does what it wants in who it wants.  That may not make sense, but it does in my head.  
There are some people, that I do wonder, and cannot actually believe HAVE  NOT gotten cancer.  Like my ex.  Who abuses his body with eating crap, and chewing tobacco, and seems to go through life unscathed.  

Anyway, when you think about the amount of cells dividing in your body all the time, it really isn't surprising that something can go awry.  

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Tks Sweetblood. It is very helpful what you said. Interesting about the cells.
Tks for taking the time to explain.

Merry xmas :) Sue

NJR
Posts: 82
Joined: Oct 2011

Here is the dirty truth. Somewhere down the line whether that be through governmental pressures, academic, the insurance industry or a combination of them all it was decided that it was not unethical to attribute a definitive cause to virtually any disease if it served the "social good" AKA Social Engineering, AKA Propaganda. The truth is, they know the cause of few if any cancers. Their determinations are base entirely on the consensus of probability which we have recently found out was questionable at best with the NEW information that HPV could be the cause of most Head and Neck cancers. A few years ago the academic circles would have scoffed at the idea and then slandered anyone who dared to differ without mercy because smoking causes all diseases!
The amounts of money driving "studies" who's results are tailored to the desired outcome is staggering and when you trace most of it back to the source you almost always find the Insurance Industry with the purse strings setting the stage to be able to deny coverage to those who live a lifestyle that threatens their profit margin.
There are over 30 different substances that could have caused any of our cancers but if your research hospital derives part of it's income from or is owned by an Insurance Company then naturally the outcomes are going to be what the board of directors or the Federal Bureaucracy in charge of care rationing desired it to be.
Hold onto your shorts because it is going to get worse. The next big push you are going to see is already in practice for the Brits. There, their government several years ago made it legal for doctors to list a contributory factor as the cause on Death Certificates if it served the (once again) "Social Good" For example, if you die of a heart attack and you ever smoked, the doctor can list "Smoking" as the cause of death. The lawmakers were very upset that doctors there were refusing the opportunity they had given them to contribute to the "Social Good." Wait awhile, once they figure out how to nudge them into playing ball you will see it implemented here.

RushFan's picture
RushFan
Posts: 218
Joined: Aug 2010

I never smoked...though lots of second hand smoke growing up...LOTS. My dad a a heavy smoker. He started when he enlisted in WWII. He passed from a stroke at age 78...on his death cert it stated basically he died from a stroke, brought on by hypertension...caused by SMOKING. I often wondered if my dads doc wanted me to pursue someting? My dad knew smoking was a terrible habit. He had colon cancer when I was in grade school and lived with a colostomy for 30+ years...and continued to smoke. Addicted. He developed bladder cancer, chose not to treat the slow moving disease and continued to smoke. He died of a stroke, but cancer was tracking him down like it does so many.

I quit social drinking 17 years ago...I was a binge drinker in college. I also quit using Copenhagen 17 years ago. I asked my doctor point blank about the chewing tobacco and second hand smoke...she said VERY unlikely.

When I was diagnosed, HPV was being brought into the conversation more and more. That was about two years ago. At my last CT scan three weeks ago, she all but guaranteed that my cancer (SSC mets to lymphnode, unknown primary) was caused or triggered or whatever you want to call it by HPV.

Best to all here, MERRY CHRISTMAS & A HEALTHY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR!!!!

jtl's picture
jtl
Posts: 420
Joined: Sep 2011

It seems to me that to prove any one factor caused someones cancer is next to impossible but there is little doubt in my mind that smoking is a trigger for some forms of cancer including scchn. Unless of course there is some huge conspiracy against the tobacco industry which I also doubt. If we doubt all of the scientific data on this subject maybe we need to throw HPV under the bus as well. Also smoking and HPV are not mutually exclusive. Personally I don't care if someone smokes or not as long as they don't litter the landscape with their butts.

RayTodd's picture
RayTodd
Posts: 187
Joined: Aug 2011

Could not have said it better

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8087
Joined: Sep 2009

I believe you said it wasn't HPV derived, but not sure if that was determined through biopsy or not....

I was never a tobacco user, but have been a casual drinker for years...along with being exposed to secondary smoke, and all kinds of fumes and vapors from a fossil fuel burning power plant.

As for the other posts, I'm not really into the whole conspiracy theory assumptions.

Best,
John

KTeacher
Posts: 938
Joined: Jan 2011

The new Cure magazine has an article, Connecting the dots, talking about reasons we get cancer. 2 part article, need to wait for the next edition (I still don't think that hey will have answers for us). You can go online, CURE, free.

NJR
Posts: 82
Joined: Oct 2011

Thank you for the tip on CURE magazine. I was a bit surprised for the author to say that except in cases of inherited genetic mutations, what caused your cancer is a question that NO ONE CAN ANSWER! ;-)

I wasn't surprised at the answer because I already knew it. What surprised me was that as a stock broker and floor trader in my life immediately preceding cancer the first thing I do is trace the source of information I receive. CURE Magazine is owned by McKesson Specialty Health which is a subsidiary of McKesson Inc, which itself is a subsidiary of none other than Humana Inc. one of the largest health care providers, insurers, and MHO's in the world.

One can call me a conspiracy theorist instead of using their own critical thinking skills if they like, but now they have to ask themselves, if this is true, then why did my doctor tell me that (fill in the cause) caused my cancer? Why did they say a couple of years ago that 75% of all our cancers were caused by smoking and now they say that 75% are actually caused by HPV? Why do all the questionnaires ask if you smoke, how much, how long ago, but they never ask about any of the other suspected causes?

Conspiracy, Agenda, Motive, call it what you will. The fact remains, they don't know what caused any of our cancers. They cannot look at any one of us and tell us what caused our cancers, yet they do. Why is that?

KTeacher
Posts: 938
Joined: Jan 2011

My doctors have not been able to tell me a cause for my cancer. I am a non-smoker, non-drinker and HPV-. I have asked, they don't even try to guess.

NJR
Posts: 82
Joined: Oct 2011

You didn't give them what they wanted to hang their hat on. I am a non drinker, HPV- and smoked as a teenager 30 some years ago. My first ENT doctor didn't hesitate to state my exact staging and tacked onto it, "and I am attributing it to smoking as the cause." I appreciated her candor but knew that if she was willing to do that, she wouldn't hesitate to present arbitrary information as fact down the road. I found a new ENT surgeon who said that he is certain that smoking plays a part in many diseases but they have gotten completely carried away using that as the easy answer instead of just saying they don't know.

It is easy to look at the statistics and attribute a cause knowing the odds are in your favor of being right if the numbers are. No one catches on until those number are found to be faulty.

longtermsurvivor's picture
longtermsurvivor
Posts: 1800
Joined: Mar 2010

overinterpreting the use of terms "cause" and "effect". Those terms have no practical application in this discussion. There are definitely "causal relationships" among the various factors being discussed here, but the relationships are only that--- relationships. If it were as simple as the "HPV causes throat cancer", or "smoking causes throat cancer," then everyone who smokes, or everyone exposed to HPV would have throat cancer.

Your cynical view of the world to the contrary, not everything is a conspiracy. And even if it were, none of this discussion helps any of us in dealing with our problems. I mean you no disrespect, but this is a support board. And our posts either need to help each other deal with our various cancers and the problems inherent in their treatment/follow-up, or they are better left to another outlet.

Best regards

Pat

RogerRN43
Posts: 185
Joined: Sep 2011

Going back to Sue's questions, HNSCC is rare, blame it on one's genetics and carcinogenic or irritative agents to the oral mucosa, it's hard to pinpoint exact causes. It's more clear when it's a lifetime of smoking, when it's not, perhaps exposure to chemicals, HPV (like cervical), or genetic makeup like Dawn's Fanconi. If one has quit for some time, who knows? Maybe the damage is already done, and the immune system is just keeping that switch from being turned on until later in life when the immunity weakens.

I don't believe in conspiracy, I believe there are clear demonstrated relationships.

In terms of treatment, the questions are barely asked maybe because it does not change the way it's treated, not yet anyway (they are starting to think less intense treatment for HPV+). The doctors' goal is to eradicate and cure so it doesn't matter to them how it got there unless that is part of their research.

In a youtube video where a prominent HN specialist talks about survivorship, he says patients should stop smoking AND drinking. I have also read the same, and in some cases to the extreme of avoiding any future irritation, like carbonated pop. But I think we are getting into quality of life if one enjoys a drink once in a while. What's the point of living so cautiously from hence on, if you can't enjoy it?

Irishgypsie's picture
Irishgypsie
Posts: 331
Joined: May 2010

Cheers to that! :)

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8087
Joined: Sep 2009

LOL, Hi bud, wishing you an Abby a great Holiday and any other squeezes in your life.

Always in my prayers,
John

D Lewis's picture
D Lewis
Posts: 1533
Joined: Jan 2010

I've missed you around. Merry Christmas!

Deb

HydroLar's picture
HydroLar
Posts: 14
Joined: Dec 2011

Having developed tonsil cancer I was curious as to how and why this happened. I smoked for 25 years with the inhaled smoke hitting my 'bad' tonsil with each puff. Did this result in cancer? Maybe. I also drank some and I loved really, really hot and spicy foods.

I was warned about all 3 of these things by my radiologist as things that can trigger cancer and therefore things to avoid. My ENT mentioned that my cancer may have been developing for 3 years or so before it manifested itself as a swelling on my neck. Coincidentally that happened to be the exact time I had quit smoking.

I still don't smoke and I will only drink on special occasions if I ever regain a taste for alcohol but I still eat mildly spicy food. So what will trigger cancer? Probably a combo of all 3 things along with environmental pollution and genetics.

In other words no one really knows. If you live a life of moderation and not necessarily complete abstinence you'll probably be fine.

Larry

D Lewis's picture
D Lewis
Posts: 1533
Joined: Jan 2010

"Live a life of moderation..." Nope. Didn't work for me. Don't smoke, don't drink, but my tumor was HPV positive.

Deb

HydroLar's picture
HydroLar
Posts: 14
Joined: Dec 2011

Hi Deb, I have often wondered if my cancer was the result of having HPV. My oncologist told me there was no way to test men for HPV so I'll probably never know. I've read that HPV is more common than the common cold and that 80% of women in their 50's test positive. If true, that would mean that I would most likely have it.

But just in case HPV did not cause my cancer I have made the decision not to smoke or drink anymore. Eating spicy foods is a little harder to stop for me...

Larry

D Lewis's picture
D Lewis
Posts: 1533
Joined: Jan 2010

Hi Larry

So glad you found your way on here. It's always good to meet a fellow warrior.

The oncologist had my tumor material tested for genetic evidence of the HPV virus. It came back positive for HPV-16, one of the two forms of the virus most responsible for cervical cancer in women. I should have been more specific - I do not actually have an active case of the HPV virus, I just have the genetic material from the virus in the metastatic tumor they removed from my lymph nodes.

I asked my Stanford doctor about spicy foods and drinking. He told me that in all likelihood, neither had anything to do with my cancer, and I was free to enjoy them in moderation as I wished.

Deb

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8087
Joined: Sep 2009

Your oncologist is correct in stating that there is no way to routinely test men for HPV.... But he/she could have tested any tissue suspect (like your tonsils) by doing additional biopsy testing (or having the tissue tested).

I'm not sure of the specifics, apparently it needs to be sent somewhere for HPV testing. I know he (my ENT) did a quick biopsy the same time my tonsils were removed and it was positive for SCC.

He send the tissue out and about three weeks later it came back as HPV+.

Also, according to recent studies, nearly 80% of ALL people over the age of 40ish, have been expose and had HPV.

But then again, more than likely all of us have been exposed to cancer cells and who knows what else. Usually our bodies immune system gets rid of that stuff...but occasionally for some reason it doesn't..stress, illness, whatever.

I think (in my unprofessional opinion), that the majority of cancers are just luck of the draw, genetics, who really knows.

I mean even with known causes, such as tobacco, smoking etc....it's not a given.

How many people do you know that have smoked their entire life and don't have cancer? I'm not going to do things that I know have a great potential, but if you believe all of the information passed, it seems that nearly everything has potential to cause cancer.

Anyways...food for thought.

Best,
John

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Yes well said.....moderation is the answer I would think. Tks for your input Larry

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

All of you have mentionned many interesting subjects during this discussion. I am learning a lot from you people. Hard to say how one can develop cancer for sure.
We have to concentrate on the treatments and find ways to get better and live a comfortable life.

Again....very much appreciated. Tks, Sue

Merry xmas/Joyeux Noel :)

Pam M's picture
Pam M
Posts: 2194
Joined: Nov 2009

My docs could/did not name a culprit. Several risk factors applied, though. I worked long hours at a stressful job, was obese, was a former heavy smoker and drinker, drank LOTS of soft drinks and processed foods, have a yard that is regularly dosed with chemicals. I did not spend eight hours a day lying in the poison grass, though - I quit smoking several years ago - I quit drinking heavily in my early twenties. But I have read that it may take from five to forty years for a tumor to develop. I think it is most likely some combo of where you are, what you do, and what your body makes of it. Oh - mine was HPV negative, so there's one thing I can't blame my cancer on.

luv4lacrosse's picture
luv4lacrosse
Posts: 1392
Joined: Jul 2010

.... Is or may be the direct cause of any of our cancer diagnoses?? My Doc's all say the primary cause of my cancer was definitely HPV related, and that smoking and drinking with HPV cancer is not considered to me a primary suspect of getting cancer. I never smoked at all but was a regular social drinker for most of my life. I know people personally who smoke two packs of cigs a day and sit in a tavern every day after work, eat fast food and have never even had a major health issue. How do we explain this?? We cannot, I truly believe cancer for the most part will attack whomever and for whatever reason, just like I am 14 months post treatment and all is good, and others who have the exact same treatment as I did have a recurrance just a month or two after initial eradicaion of cancer. Why does this happen?? There are people like us right now that will continue to smoke and drink and have not had a recurrance?? Why does this happen??

My gut tells me that HPV is going to be a huge part of cancer diagnoses in the future, and we may also discover that before we knew anything about HPV derived HNC, that it may have already been a growing factor in the number of new cases of cancer in the past??

For me personally, I have made allot of changes to accommodate my "new normal." I eat much healthier than in years past, mostly due to the fact that fast food, deli sandwiches, steak, ETC. I simply have a hard time swallowing. The weight I lost from being sick I have managed to keep off through a better diet, and now that I do not compete in powerlifting anymore, I circuit train with what I consider heavy weight, but allot of reps and sets. I made a choice to give up my passion for "Grey Goose" cock tails, but if I feel like having 5 or 6 beers at a sporing event or the many professional orginazations that have social gatherings related to my work, I will do so.

My doc's still want me to adhere to the ACS rule of "2 per day" for a man, and allot of the time I do, but I cannot live my life hiding from everything the news media and the medical profession says will cause cancer.

I have rambled on far too long, but I guess i am trying to say, "we just do not know" and especiallly "why me and not the other guy" who is doing all of the stuff the medical community promises will cause cancer, and this guy will never get cancer.

I hope all of my friends here at CSN had a wonderfull Christmas, and whatever condition you may currently be in when New Years comes, try to ring it in as much as you can in your own way.

BEST!!

Mike

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8087
Joined: Sep 2009

Couldn't have said it better myself....

Oh, LOL....I did say something similar...great minds think alike.

But joking aside, I totally agree with your comments.

Best,
John

Sue22's picture
Sue22
Posts: 99
Joined: Nov 2011

Tks Pam M and Mike.

Well said. I tend to agree for now. I am new in all this so I have to make up my own opinions with all of your info. Very interesting.

Enjoy the holidays everyone. Sue

Kent Cass's picture
Kent Cass
Posts: 1746
Joined: Nov 2009

To my surprise, when diagnosed with NPC, that said C is NOT attributed to smoking. Could not find it anywhere. NPC is also known as Cantonese C, because of the large percentage of it in a certain area of China. The suspected cause of NPC most noted is "salted fish." I gave up drinking in 85, but was a smoker for some 36 years, and perhaps it did contribute to it, but no Dr has ever told me it did, and my research tells me the "smart people" don't think it did. Me- I think it probably did.

kcass

tommyodavey's picture
tommyodavey
Posts: 358
Joined: Nov 2011

I of course asked my surgeon what would have caused my Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma. He said exposure to radiation or other carcinogenic chemicals. But then added that one really knows anyway and it's all guesses.

From what I remember, I've had no exposure to radiation, (at least not yet) but did smoke for 24 years and drank for about the same. Been over two decades off both. When I researched my type of cancer, which is fairly rare, it said the same thing he said. Also stated it affects children and those in their fifties. So how can children have exposure or bad habits? I just tell people that it's random.

The kicker is my long gone father in law. He had Oral Cancer and they had him in surgery within hours of seeing it. At the time he was 57, my age.

He did the traditional therapy and took 5 extra hits of radiation because they said he took it so well. Never missing work or complaining. He did say he lost his taste buds but they came back in two years. All during his radiation and chemo he never stopped smoking or drinking. Go figure.

The Oral Cancer never came back but Pancreatic did and that's what took his life. He was 74.

One can never figure out a pattern with this disease.

My 2¢ worth.

Tommy

RayTodd's picture
RayTodd
Posts: 187
Joined: Aug 2011

honest medico's call it Predisposition . I know people non smoker non drinker non conducive environment and still got it. It's life and this is just my personal opinion I am not that interested in what causes it as I have seen people eaten up because of self guilt or blame or whatever but again just me it's happened brace the feet square the shoulders and take it on and squeeze the life out of every day.

To lighten things someone the other day when I I joked about everyday above ground is a bonus told me what he does is as soon as he wakes up he pushes his elbows to the side and if he doesn't touch wood he knows its going to be a good day. I had some water in my mouth (saliva gone from Rad) I laughed so hard I gave my nose an enema. heheheh

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8087
Joined: Sep 2009

LOL, good to see your humor is intact Ray....

I'm one of those that find humor in most everything also....

When I was in treatment, my favorite was;

"Other than having cancer, I'm in perfect health"...

Best,
John

RayTodd's picture
RayTodd
Posts: 187
Joined: Aug 2011

I have two tickets for a $31 MILL LOTTO which I have not checked cause I won anyway Tickets will be in mail as soon as I pick up the $31MILL Change of deal thought there will be tickets to Bali first for my birthday bash hehehe.

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