CSN Login
Members Online: 4

small liver lesion

Jamie1.3cm's picture
Jamie1.3cm
Posts: 188
Joined: Jan 2011

Hi. I had my first follow-up ct scan since my kidney cancer surgery. All clear on the kidney cancer. Yay! But I do have a small lesion on my liver. In June, it was 4 mm, and in December, it is 9 mm. I'm only going by the radiologist's report, as, for whatever reason, no doc has called me about the report yet. So, I still have much to learn about what this might be, if it can be biopsied, and what interventions will be needed. (I've never smoked, don't drink, no history of hep.)

For me, this would be my 3rd primary cancer before the age of 50! I'm starting to think I just might be the unluckiest person in the world. But not really. At least we always seem to catch mine early. But putting out cancer fires, one right after the other, is not a life I would have chosen for myself. Sorry. Feeling tired tonight.

LeeandShirley's picture
LeeandShirley
Posts: 122
Joined: Apr 2011

Don't wait for the docs to contact you. Contact them. Seems like in these days of personal advocacy, we patients have been left holding the ball a lot of the time. Since doctors do consider us the person in charge of our own health care, they often do not take the lead. That to me seems like dropping the ball, but the reality is: if you don't advocate for yourself, sometimes there is no one to do it. Your best bet is to get to a comprehensive cancer center, where they take a team approach and the ball is always in the air, so to speak. The more docs involved the less likely something will be missed. Sorry for all the metaphores, but it just seemed to apply. Hope all goes well with you and wish you a healthy and prosperous New Year.

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi: I have the same problem (gallbladder cancer, peritoneum cancer, and now maybe liver cancer). Yes, definitely call them!!!! That's their job. I too have questionable things that have been called "lesions" and "hemangiomas". The latest CT scan results were interpreted as a possible tumour but the MRIs were interpreted as hemangiomas. They can do additional scans on you (ultrasound, MRi, PET). I'm having a test next week whereby they remove a sample of blood from me, separate out the red blood cells, and then reinject that back into my liver with a small bit of nuclear material. A non-tumour will light up apparently.
Cheryl

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Unfortunately the "thing" did not light up so it is a tumour. Now to figure out further treatments.
Cheryl

blueheaven56
Posts: 18
Joined: Dec 2011

Hi Jamie,

Please, please be proactive in your care. DO NOT WAIT on the doctors to call you. You need to call your doctors to get your results. Find out if they presented your scan to a tumor board for recomendations. With your history, they should have. Have they done lab work? A chem-12 or CCP will show if your liver enzymes are elevated. Too many times, things can fall through the cracks. Get another opinion from a center that specializes in liver cancer/tumors. If it is HCC (or any other), the sooner you get it treated, the better.

AFP's (alpha-fetoprotein) blood work is done frequently to screen/monitor liver cancer. If it is NOT elevated, this isn't a 100% for sure that it isn't cancer. Don't let anyone tell you it is. My husbands AFP was normal and became very mildly elevated which then returned to normal after his biopsy. (GO fig!)

Whether they choose to biopsy depends on how it looks on the scans. Sometimes a biopsy is not necessary. They go by the way it appears on the CT and MRI. An MRI or PET scan should be the next step in diagnosing. MRIs and PET scans give a better picture of the vasculature and can sometimes find other lesions that didn't show up on CT.

There are many things that can be done now to treat liver tumors. University of Pittsburgh and University of Maryland Medical Centers have a lot of information on their web sites about various treatments available.

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network