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gallbladder cancer stage 4

eveterry
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 2011

HI, My name is Evelyne, I was diagnosed with cancer back in August. After what seemed like
an eternity of waiting to hear what type of cancer I had and a lot of tests, I was finally
told in September that I had gallbladder cancer stage 4 and only had 6 to 9 months to live.
I was offered an aggressive type of chemo (gemcitabine/Cisplatin split)which I declined
as I was told that whilst on chemo, if I caught a simple cold, the outcome could be fatal.
I have since spoken to a specialist in London who says the chemo for gallbladder cancer isnt
aggressive. I have also asked whether I could have my gallbladder removed and all have said
that the only treatment is palliative and having surgery is not an option as my cancer has
spread to the peritoneum and bile duct, to which they fitted a plastic stent. Having read your comments on the forum has given me a little hope
asmany of you have had the surgery and survived. Over the last three weeks I have noticed
that my stomach has swollen. Could anyone tell me if thisis one of the symptons? I am going
to see a specialist tomorrow as no one has helped me so far and I feel that my case has been
swept under the carpet.

zz
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2011

My Mom who is 86 survived bile duct cancer surgery. It had spread to her liver and lymp nodes. She is undergoing chemo and radiation. Don't give up. Find another doctor if this one is sweeping it under the carpet.
You are in my prayers

SharFa
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 2011

zz
I am taking care of my Mom who's been diagnosed with bile duct cancer. Doctors want to do chemo first to try and shrink tumor because it's close to artery, etc. I am so happy your Mom is doing well. Are you able to share where the surgery was done. I would like to contact by email if possible?
Bless you.

maudsie
Posts: 54
Joined: May 2010

Evelyne, I am sorry for your news -- hopefully chemo can keep your cancer in check. The swollen stomach sounds like "ascites" to me, possibly the result of the cancer in your peritoneum. Your docs should be able to offer some remedy ( or relief) for this.
Best of luck! Maudsie

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Evelyne: I, too, am sorry that you have been diagnosed with Stage IV gallbladder cancer. That is what I was diagnosed with in Oct 2009 and here I am today. Doctors tend to be negative about gallbladder and peritoneum cancer but the stats they have are old. Things are improving, albeit slowly, as rare cancers don't get looked at as often as the more common ones. Anyways, I would definitely suggest another opinion. Do you mean London, England (I am in London, Ontario)? I had my gallbladder out with its tumour and part of my liver where the tumour had infiltrated in April 2010. I was told after the surgery that the tumour had seeded to the peritoneum where I had some cancerous nodules (6 it turns out). Little hope. Anyways, I had chemo (cisplatin + gemcitibine) for 12 treatments - no new cancer but the nodules didn't shrink. My oncologist put me on oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU pump (latter for 42 hrs) for 12 treatments (finished last week) and my latest MRI shows no new cancer anywhere, no growth of nodules, and some even shrank. So I'm off chemo until January and he is looking at surgical options. I feel great. Luckily my tumour protuded out from the gallbladder at the opposite end from the bile duct so my bile duct seems OK.
Keep us posted! Several people on this discussion board have survivied Stage IV gallbladder cancer so you can too.
Cheryl

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Evelyne: If you check the Peritoneum Cancer discussion board, you'll see a lot of folks have ascites (liquid in the peritoneal cavity). It is more common with primary peritoneum cancer and ovarian cancer spread to the peritoneum. A standard treatment is drainage which relieves the problem a lot. My swollen abdomen is from an incisional hernia where the intestines have broken through at the incision site from my surgery April 2010.
Cheryl

sherrygj
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 2011

my mom was diagnosed 3 d ago with gallbladder carcinoma... multiple liver mets and nodes...i refuse to be hopeless but i am a doctor and know the statistics i keep telling myself that my mom is a person and not a ratio in a hem/onc journal... i have appreciated the experiences of others that are shared here... thanks to all of you

sherrygj
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 2011

my mom was diagnosed 3 d ago with gallbladder carcinoma... multiple liver mets and nodes...i refuse to be hopeless but i am a doctor and know the statistics i keep telling myself that my mom is a person and not a ratio in a hem/onc journal... i have appreciated the experiences of others that are shared here... thanks to all of you

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi: That's how I felt when I was told about them but the stats can be old (from the 70's) and often gallbladder cancer isn't diagnosed until the tumour is too big to do anything about. Somehow we need to get better screening. My GP noted an unusually high liver enzyme level when I had my annual physical and that's how we were alerted that it may have been caused by the gallbladder tumour. Unfortunately gallbladder cancer is still rare (although the numbers are increasing or the diagnoses anyways) so there isn't a great deal of research on it. I had part of my liver resectioned but still have the peritoneum nodules (6 of them) which are stabilized and even shrinking a bit with the oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU chemo treatment. Surgery may now be the next step.
Good luck to your mom.
Cheryl

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi,

Sorry to read your post so late but I'm Lily and I am a 6 year survivor of Gallbladder Cancer Stage 4. The statistics are very outdated with regards to this disease. As a doctor yourself you know that having the best doctor in the field that has experience with this disease can really make a difference. You have resources available to you that many don't so find the right doctors to help your mom on this journey. What a great advocate your mom will have since you love her and are a doctor. What a great combination!
You can see other survivors on the thread Gallbladder Cancer - 2011.

My email address is LGregg6293@Aol.Com if you would prefer to talk that way. Just put ACS-CSN in the subject line so it doesn't end up in my spam folder.

Take Care
Lily

puglover89
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2012

Dear all,
Hi, I am a 22 y-o grad student, and my dearest 77 y-o grandma was just diagnosed with Stage IV gallbladder cancer. After reading discussion boards, I am a lot more hopeful for my grandma. She is not ready to die and wants to live more healthy years. The cancer has spread to her liver (~4cm tumor), her bile duct and small intestine (~3cm), and she has multiple small ones on her peritoneum (omentum) which are producing ascites. We have been told she is inoperable (even if the chemo works wonderfully) because the fluid carries cancer cells and is all around her abdomen. She has already gotten 2 paracentesis procedures to drain out the fluid so she could feel less bloated and eat. The fluid will keep coming back, however, so long as she has the cancer. Her main symptom right now is the bloating, constipation, her inability to eat much, and some pain.She will be using Gemzar (without Cisplatin because of her age) for the 1st and 8th day, with a week off, so 21 days per cycle.
After reading all the discussion boards, I do not think we have a compassion doctor who is one to fight for his patients. I think he relies on the statistics and doesn't think my grandma will make it that far. After being asked, he said the medium life expectancy is 6 months w/o treatment, and 12-18 w/ treatment and said there is only a 20% change of the chemo working. He said he is aiming for a year for my grandma right now.
Right now, I am just praying the Gemzar works wonders because the doctor sounds like he is going to give up if it doesn't. Do you guys think she should be on Gemzar+Cisplatin for such an aggressive disease? I think the doctor should have at least tried that cocktail first.
I have been urging my parents to get 2nd and 3rd opinions from other institutions, and we are going to consult the Sloan-Kettering Center for Cancer Care in Manhattan and another one in NJ. I have told them that since GBC is so rare, it is imperative to get a specialists' opinion on this.
I would have never in a million years thought someone in my family would get cancer. I was so ignorant to think that cancer was something "other people" got. I have been hanging in there because my grandma has almost been like a mother to me, and I hope everyone else with this disease hangs in there! My email is dey208@lehigh.edu; please feel free to email me. I would love to hear other people experiences, especially with the elderly.
-Denise

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi Evelyne,

Sorry to read your post so late but I'm Lily and I am a 6 year survivor of Gallbladder Cancer Stage 4. I too was given a short timeframe to live but they were wrong!

My chemo cocktail was gemzar and cisiplatin. I had very aggressive treatment and there were many twists and turns on the road but I'm still here to talk about it. It took me 11 months of chemo and time to find the right surgeon to help me. You have to find a team that will become vested in your success. You might have to talk to many doctors until you find the right ones.

Ascites is very common and can be treated.

Don't let any doctor take away your Hope and don't let them treat you like a statistic. You are a person that is fighting for your life and they should respect that.

Take Care
Lily

Genna819's picture
Genna819
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2012

Hi Lily-

I am a 46 yr old female. On 12/2/11 I was diagnosed with Stage IV Gallbladder cancer. I was in the hospital for 5 weeks before they determined what was causing a myriad of digestive issues. Unfortunately it took an open surgery to find the cancer, as the surgeons believed I had large stones in my bile duct, which of course turned out to be tumors. I did have my gallbladder removed on 2/14/11, and the Onc believes that the surgery released the cancer cells into my body.

I have been given a a grim prognosis, but as long as I have breath in my body I am going to fight, even though I have been told that success isn't possible. I am currently undergoing chemo with gemcitabine and cisplatin and have a cat scan scheduled for later this month. So, I still have hope, even though I am told I'm kidding myself. Which makes any type of hope even more significant.

You posted: Don't let any doctor take away your Hope and don't let them treat you like a statistic. You are a person that is fighting for your life and they should respect that.

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you for reading my mind. I couldn't agree more.

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Genna: I, too, was diagnosed with stage IV gallbladder cancer that had spread to the peritoneum and now to the liver. I had the gallbladder, its tumour, and part of my liver taken out April 2010. I was actually diagnosed October 2009. Here it is March 2012 and I'm still here! Don't let them tell you that you've got only 2-3 months like they told LIly and I. Sure, that does happen, but not to us. I had 12 treatments of gemcitibine + cisplatin which I tolerated very well. And then 12 treatments of FOLFOXIRI (oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU on pump) which is a tough chemo regime but I survived. It did serve to shrink some of the peritoneum nodules and maybe kept spreading cancer at bay. I'm not sure where we go from here - surgery? more chemo? But I feel wonderful and don't dwell on it.
Keep us posted!
Cheryl

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

I'm so sorry that this disease has come into your life at such a young age. Your age can be very useful in the treatment that you will be receiving. I too was 46 years old when diagnosed with inoperable Stage 4 GBC. It came out of left field for me. I am happy to say I will be celebrating my 53rd bday this year. Many doctors gave me a very short-time frame to live and they were all wrong!

Was your surgery done laparoscopically? When that type of surgery is done seeding can occur.

I'm so glad to hear that you are going to fight this terrible beast. Attitude can be very helpful in successful treatment. It makes me so sad to hear that doctors are no longer compassionate and I understand that they don't want to give a patient false hope but they could say what my oncologist said to me. That was that "he was willing to try and help me in any way that he could as long as I was willing to go the distance". What other answer would there be except Hell Yes! He would take me to Hell and back many times but without him I would have never made it.

You are on the same chemo cocktail that I was on. It can be difficult but the side effects can become manageable.

You aren't kidding yourself and anyone who says that to you is a negative person and you don't need them in your life right now. Surround yourself with helpful, supportive, loving people who can go hand and hand with you on this journey.

You haven't told us any information about where you are from or what family support structure you have. Let us know and maybe there is someone in your local area that you could become connected to. Or you can talk to all of us. We all love to talk. Ask us anything you want and we will try to help you.

Take Care
Lily

Genna819's picture
Genna819
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2012

Hi Lily-

Thank you for your words of encouragement. I am really trying to stay positive and hopeful throughout this process. I had a follow-up cat scan yesterday and am eagerly awaiting the results. I don't know what to expect of course, but at least I will know which way things are going. In reality, I am scared to death. I don't know what to expect as any results could be possible.

I am even considering a new Onc if the scan results aren't very good (or even if they are outstanding), because this dr just isn't making me feel like my life is worth prolonging. Maybe it's me- which is possible, but I feel as a patient I deserve a doctor that will back me up in a fight to prolong the life I have made for myself and at the quality I expect.

You are 100% right about surrounding myself with positive and supportive people that care about my health and want me around for many years to come. All others can move on as they really don't have a place in my world.

Thank you again- xoxox

Genna819's picture
Genna819
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2012

I got the results of my scan, and in short- my Onc with zero personality said the results are Excellent! And she smiled. And I did a cartwheel with a circus dismount in my mind. There was a significant decrease in the size of the tumors, and in the markers in my blood. I am, apparently, responding well to the treatment. So we are going to stay the course, and in 6 to 8 weeks, we'll do another scan. Prayers, Crystal Light, holy water massages, and some chemo are carrying me through. It's going to be a good weekend. :)

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

That's great news! If I could do a cartwheel for you I would!
Cheryl

Genna819's picture
Genna819
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2012

I know it's an odd question- but really, with Stage 4 GB Cancer, how long does each chemo series last? I had an appointment on Wed. with my Onc, and the way she explained it was that I would continue to receive chemo until my body couldn't tolerate it anymore. Now, I hate to say this to her, but what if I improve enough where I don't need the chemo- but I don't say it, because she will label it as denial. I'm still curious, just the same. How long have you been receiving chemo? Or better yet- how long have you gone without it.

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi: On my first go around I started chemo August 2010 on gemcitibine + cisplatin and had 12 treatments (2 wks on, 1 wk off). Because of a mistaken reading on the MRI scan which seemed to show no more peritoneal mets (form the gallbladder cancer which had been removed in surgery April 2010), I was taken off chemo. A new scan done for my surgeon who was going to fix my incisional hernia showed, nope, they were still there, so I started back on chemo in June 2011 - this time on something called folfirinox (oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU pump) administerd every 2 wks (pump 42 hrs). I had 12 treatments of that (which I had to pay for). I had a chemo break starting Nov 4 and am back on it now (first treatment was Friday). I was awaiting news of possible surgery (peritoneal stripping/HIPEC) but that is a no go. Now I am awaiting an MRI to see if there was progression from my break. The folfirinox had stabilized the progression and even shrunk 1 or 2 of the peritoneum mets. There is always the fear that without chemo things will start to grow! It sucks you in that way! I'll find out in a few weeks. Others have gone on for quite some time on chemo with breaks but there apparently does become a point where nothing we have works. That's the problem with gallbladder cancer - not much research on it because it is rare.
Cheryl

Genna819's picture
Genna819
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2012

Hi Cheryl-

How are you feeling overall? You were originally diagnosed in 2009, so you've been fighting it and keeping the devil down for quite awhile. But really- the question is this- How are you feeling? Are you able to do the things you enjoy doing? Also, which meds do you take daily? Do you take a painkiller or something else?

Thank you!
Genna

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Thanks, Genna, for asking. I am feeling pretty good overall. No pain. The side effects of the chemo are a bit nasty for a few days. It is more a problem of not being able to go anywhere as the few days after the chemo pump comes off diarrhea and fatigue are pretty nasty and then the PICC line has to be flushed and then it is see the oncologist and nurse again and more chemo. So I don't have any days really to go somewhere nice. I'm an avid birdwatcher (birded all over the world) and I've missed 3 summers of it now which is the most discouraging! But I can get around, feel good most of the time, have lots of friends here, have a beautiful little dog that is really a big help, and the weather is warm and sunny with birds chirping everywhere. I don't take any meds daily except for the normal ones I have always taken for blood pressure (good) and arthritis. And on chemo for nausea (not a problem) and diarrhea (problem!). It is just discouraging to see other people get the treatment I may have benefitted from earlier on. But I'm so happy for them! And having to pay for chemo (yup, even in Canada!).
Cheryl

wildflower07
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 2012

Hi Cheryl,
I have been searching the Internet for stories of survivors of this awful disease. My Mum, who is 68 has recently been diagnosed. We have been told that it's inoperable. It has spread to her liver and lymph nodes. There is too much liver involved to do any type of surgery. She will be starting chemo on July 17th she will be on cisplatin and gemcitabine. I saw that you were on that initially, but then tried something different. It's encouraging to know there might be another option if my Mum doesn't respond to these first two drugs. Her oncologist didn't mention anything else though. It sounded like these are the only drugs and you either respond or you don't. Even with this treatment we have been told the median survival is only 8-11 months. I pray they are wrong! I'm so glad I found this site and your story. I'd love to hear more from you if possible. God bless you and may you continue to beat this!!
Sincerely,
Sarah

puglover89
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2012

Dear all,
Hi, I am a 22 y-o grad student, and my dearest 77 y-o grandma was just diagnosed with Stage IV gallbladder cancer. After reading discussion boards, I am a lot more hopeful for my grandma. She is not ready to die and wants to live more healthy years. The cancer has spread to her liver (~4cm tumor), her bile duct and small intestine (~3cm), and she has multiple small ones on her peritoneum (omentum) which are producing ascites. We have been told she is inoperable (even if the chemo works wonderfully) because the fluid carries cancer cells and is all around her abdomen. She has already gotten 2 paracentesis procedures to drain out the fluid so she could feel less bloated and eat. The fluid will keep coming back, however, so long as she has the cancer. Her main symptom right now is the bloating, constipation, her inability to eat much, and some pain.She will be using Gemzar (without Cisplatin because of her age) for the 1st and 8th day, with a week off, so 21 days per cycle.
After reading all the discussion boards, I do not think we have a compassion doctor who is one to fight for his patients. I think he relies on the statistics and doesn't think my grandma will make it that far. After being asked, he said the medium life expectancy is 6 months w/o treatment, and 12-18 w/ treatment and said there is only a 20% change of the chemo working. He said he is aiming for a year for my grandma right now.
Right now, I am just praying the Gemzar works wonders because the doctor sounds like he is going to give up if it doesn't. Do you guys think she should be on Gemzar+Cisplatin for such an aggressive disease? I think the doctor should have at least tried that cocktail first.
I have been urging my parents to get 2nd and 3rd opinions from other institutions, and we are going to consult the Sloan-Kettering Center for Cancer Care in Manhattan and another one in NJ. I have told them that since GBC is so rare, it is imperative to get a specialists' opinion on this.
I would have never in a million years thought someone in my family would get cancer. I was so ignorant to think that cancer was something "other people" got. I have been hanging in there because my grandma has almost been like a mother to me, and I hope everyone else with this disease hangs in there! My email is dey208@lehigh.edu; please feel free to email me. I would love to hear other people experiences, especially with the elderly.
-Denise

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

...is a nasty cancer because there isn't much known about it. My surgeon and oncologist also didn't have much hope but because I am/was in good health and am generally a strong positive person, they decided to try everything. I was diagnosed in Oct 2009 and had surgery to remove the gallbladder, its tumour, and part of the liver. I still have cancerous nodules on my liver (only one) and the peritoneum (possibly 6). I was on cisplatin + gemcitibine and had very few side effects but it didn't do much for the tumours. I then had 14 treatments of a much nastier chemo called folfirinox (oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU pump) which did tend to reduce the size of the tumours but I came off it 4 months ago as I ended up in the hospital with a perforated bowel. Sometimes I think quality of life (i.e. off chemo) is more important than quantity. But I would certainly get a 2nd opinion from S-K and MD Anderson (in Texas). They have likely had more gallbladder cancer patients than anyone. I live in Canada where it is even less well known. I would urge your grandmother not to give up. Keep us posted. Oh, I am going to be 69 in a week.
Cheryl

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Sarah: Yes, gemcitibine and cisplatin is the standard treatment but I fear has to be given in powerful portions to do anything at all. Without surgery, well...My oncologist scoured the medical literature and the treatment he put me on is one used for colon cancer and pancreatic cancer. It is called "folfirinox" (which is oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU pump)and this did work to shrink the tumours but it is a nasty combination. Another treatment is called Folfox (oxaliplatin + 5FU) and another is folfiri (irenotecan + 5FU). The oxaliplatin and irenotecan are not well tolerated by many people but your mom is young and hopefully strong. I was on reduced amounts of oxaliplatin. Have her oncologist check out these combinations. I wish her well. There are other people on this discussion board who are still here!
Cheryl

puglover89
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2012

Cheryl,
Thank you so much for your response! I wasn't sure if anyone was still following this discussion board.
It seems your initial condition was very similar to my grandma's right now, except that my grandma also has a tumor on what seems to be her lymph nodes. Did you have ascites? How did you tolerate the surgery and how long did it take to recover? My grandmother is 77, so it seems she will not be able to handle a surgery, but I'm still looking into it. The oncologist seemed to rule out surgery because of the ascites.
I'm so scared the Gemzar won't work, and I don't think she could tolerate those other cocktails you mentioned. She's in good health otherwise, but she's not young anymore, you know?
Denise

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Denise: No, I have never had ascites with the peritoneum cancer and don't appear to have any affected lymph nodes. The surgery I had in April 2010 to remove the gallbladder, its tumour, and part of my liver was done laparoscopically which is a fairly easy surgery generally but shouldn't be done if gallbladder cancer is known - in my case they didn't know for sure. I was released from hospital the same day but ended up back in emergency the next morning with a broken blood vessel and they had to open me up with a big incision to clear that out. At that time the surgeon observed the nodules on the peritoneum and removed one for pathology and it was malignant (still gallbladder cancer though even though the growths are on the peritoneum; ditto the liver). I didn't have much pain at all but was in ICU for 10 days. I couldn't start chemo until the incision healed and that took 4 months. The major problem with the open type of surgery is that the incision runs up and down over the abdomen and that's where there are a lot of muscles. I ended up with an incisional hernia which was fixed during my two surgeries in May this year. I was up and around within days of the surgery and driving my car within 6 weeks.

I just had a CT scan and it shows no new growths, hardly any change in the peritoneum nodules, but the tumour on the liver has grown a bit. But this is since 2009 so my cancer appears to be slow growing.

The Gemzar has worked on a lot of people, just not on me as the gallbladder tumour was removed before I started on it. Everyone reacts to chemo in different ways. People much much younger than me have reacted badly while people much older than me (I'm 68 - turning 69 on Sunday) have done very well. I guess it will depend on how aggressive her cancer is. I have never had any pain from it.

Keep me posted. You might want to talk to Lily50 on this discussion board.

Cheryl

bevs niece
Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 2012

My Aunt was diagnosed with stage 4 gallbladder cancer Thursday. And like everyone else I have read about the doctors gave us little hope. They are giving her 6 months to 1 year to live and say she is not going to get any better. It has spread to her stomach lining. Has anyone had this diagnosis and gotten better. It is early, she is 59, and wants to fight. We need as much information as we can get before meeting with the oncologist next week. Thanks.
Billie

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Billie: Do you think they mean the peritoneum rather than stomach lining? My gallbladder cancer spread to the peritoneum which is the "big bag" that holds all your gastro-intestinal goodies inside. My gallbladder, its tumour, and part of the liver were removed in April 2010. Did they do any surgery on her? I was given 2-3 months in April 2010 and so there is always hope. Are they doing any chemo on her? If not, why not? The typical chemo regime for gallbladder cancer is gemcitibine + cisplatin but didn't work on me. I did something called folfirinox (oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU pump) - you might ask about that. It seemed to work on me as the nodules on the peritoneum have not increased in size or number. Keep us posted please. I am sending you both good vibes!
Cheryl

bevs niece
Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 2012

Cheryl,

Sounds like you are doing well. I really don't know if it is the peritoneum, she was just diagnosed Thursday. They went in by laparoscopy. They did not remove the gall bladder. The surgeon did a biopsy while he had her open and said he could not remove it because it was stage 4 and it had already spread into her intestine. My sister was there and she said he said it had spread to the stomach lining. We were looking for some hope and I found this site and and it looked hopeful. More hopeful than the doctors sounded. She said she wanted to fight and I was just hoping for some info to ask the oncologist. Thank you for the response and the good vibes. We will definitely keep you posted.

Thanks so much, Billie

bevs niece
Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 2012

Well, I did get a little more information. It is in the peritoneum. All around it though. She now has a partial blockage in her small bowel. She has not had a bowel movement for about 2 weeks. She has been unable to eat. They inserted an NG tube to provide some relief and that helped. She had her first chemo treatment today, they started with Gemzar. They are going to do it once a week. The surgeon said she is too comprmised to remove the blockage at this time. That would mean not getting started on the chemo for 6 to 8 weeks from now. Now I guess we just wait to see if the chemo does anything. The oncologist says the Cisplatin is too much to start with for now, he will possibly add it later, if she tolerates the Gemzar okay. Does that sound right.. We can only trust the doctors now and keep posting on this website for any info that anyone has to offer.

Thanks,

Billie

bevs niece
Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 2012

Well, I did get a little more information. It is in the peritoneum. All around it though. She now has a partial blockage in her small bowel. She has not had a bowel movement for about 2 weeks. She has been unable to eat. They inserted an NG tube to provide some relief and that helped. She had her first chemo treatment today, they started with Gemzar. They are going to do it once a week. The surgeon said she is too comprmised to remove the blockage at this time. That would mean not getting started on the chemo for 6 to 8 weeks from now. Now I guess we just wait to see if the chemo does anything. The oncologist says the Cisplatin is too much to start with for now, he will possibly add it later, if she tolerates the Gemzar okay. Does that sound right.. We can only trust the doctors now and keep posting on this website for any info that anyone has to offer.

Thanks,

Billie

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