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Anaplastic, Grade III oligodendroglioma

mamamiail
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2011

Hi -
I'm new as of tonight. Pardon me if I start crying.

My 76 yo FIL was diagnosed with an anaplastic Grade III oligodendroglioma. Officially, the report came out today; final genetic studies remain pending.

Dad underwent a craniotomy almost two weeks ago at Rush in Chicago. His neurosurgeon called me today with the pathology results. Mum and Dad were to meet with the oncologist today - who was then supposed to give me/us a call - hasn't happened. . . .

At any rate, I'm trying to learn what to expect. My background is in nursing - Hem/Onc - but things have changed so much since I worked Hem/Onc. Am I correct in understanding from the discussion board the genetics of the tumor impact survival odds?

The route to Dad's diagnosis is a convoluted one. I/we noticed behavioral changes since last Christmas. Dad is also extremely hard of hearing, and also being treated for age related macular degeneration. Throughout the spring and summer, I continued to notice behavioral changes. At the end of July, Dad's impulse control (never good at the best of times) was non-existant. And I noticed some very clear confusion - notwithstanding a language barrier (Dad is Chinese). My MIL (who is 78 and with health issues) voiced some observations that night, and together we drew up a plan. Dad's PCP had labeled him demented - which just didn't feel right. More because people who are really depressed can look demented. I was concerned that perhaps Dad was depressed, because of his hearing and vision and increasing social isolation as a result. Or so I thought.

At any rate, Dad went to have his hearing checked (third time in about 8 years), and this time the audiologist was very concerned. The EENT Dad saw obtained a MRI, and a baseball sized tumor showed up! So, we've been off to the races!

We plan to obtain the pathology report, along with the genetic studies, and I'll run the family history by two geneticists I work with in St. Louis. What are we looking at in terms of life expectancy, given that Dad is 76? What, if anything, will come back now that his brain is no longer squashed (I think I know the answer)?

Thanks for being there!
Laura

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