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Irregularly Marginated Complex Pre-Dominantly hypoechoic avascular lesion

terrihar
Posts: 1
Joined: Jul 2011

My ultrasound said that I had a thyroid gland that is homogeneous in echotexture. There is irregularly marginated complex predominantly hypoechoic avascular 1.2 x 0.5 x 0.9 lesion along the posterior margin of the inferior right thyroid lobe. This appears extrathyroidal.

The left lobe - there is a 0.7 x 0.5 x 0.6cm only slightly hypoechoic smoothly marginated oval lesion - this lesion in the anterior mid left thyroid lobe has peripheral rim of hypervascularity.

Can anyone tell me what this means.
Thanks so much for your help and time.

nasher
Posts: 507
Joined: Apr 2010

don't you just wish they spoke English

ok time to break down and give you English

homogeneous - composed of parts or elements that are all of the same kind

echotexture - how the ultrasound reflects the image

so the cells they saw were the same time by ultrasound.

extrathyroidal -- um sorry cant figure this one out yet.

hypervascularity - this is a comment about the blood flow

hypoechoic - this is about how dark the image is

the normal size of a thyroid is 4 to 4.8 x 1.0 to 1.8 x 0.8 to 1.6 cm (total)

hopefully someone can answer this better but right now I cant. the best bet you probably will have is to go to the doctor or nurse and ask them to wright it out in English.

if you find out the answers on this please post them so hopefully we can a better answer next time.

best answer i could find
--- http://www.everydayhealth.com/specialists/cancer/hensley/qa/what-are-hypoechoic-nodules/index.aspx---

Typically, benign thyroid nodules appear hyperechoic on the sonogram, while malignant (cancerous) thyroid nodules are more likely to be hypoechoic, casting off fewer or weaker echoes. However, the chance of any hypoechoic nodule being cancerous is still very low, because benign thyroid nodules are much more common.
---

Craig

Baldy's picture
Baldy
Posts: 225
Joined: Mar 2011

You REALLY REALLY need to sit down with your doctor and have him explain your pathology report. No dig at Craig, I've done the same thing on this site myself, but none of us are doctors and we are only just guessing.

Alan

nasher
Posts: 507
Joined: Apr 2010

I honestly don't have any offense.

I just try to make it easier for people to start to understand the language so when they talk to the doctor THEY have and idea

I remember when the doctor told me you have cancer your surgery is scheduled on x date. your pre-op is on this date here is the list of things you need to do to be ready for surgery.

it was a one sided talk the doctor talked to me and told me what I needed to do. back then I did not know the terminology I did not understand what was up. the doctor told me soon as they get the cancer out I will be right as rain with no worries or problems... just a small scar.

I didnt ask 1/2 the questions i should have
I didnt take charge of my treatment
I didnt ask for the doc to explain the ultrasound

the one thing i hope is that people manage to figure things out quicker and easier than i did so they know whats happening

Baldy's picture
Baldy
Posts: 225
Joined: Mar 2011

I was lucky. My surgeon made sure I understood what he was talking about. My Endo also, though only after I pressed a little. My experience with the surgeon was probably what made sure I questioned the endo.

I was very lucky with my surgeon, he's a head and neck surgery specialist who had performed my surgery many, many times. He was very positive and also very aggressive. He probably took out many times as many lymph nodes as he needed to, but I'd much rather have that than have to go back 1, 2, 3 etc times to the operating room.

===

I think one of the best things we can do is bring someone along when we go to the doctors office. They can make sure we don't get overwhelmed and don't forget to ask questions. I know I've gone to the doctor with a list of questions in hand and then forgotten to ask them.

My sister is excellent at this, when I went in for both my surgeries, she took note of the names of the nurses, anastesiologists etc as well as the gist of what was said. I don't take her with me to the doctors office because, even though she offers, I don't want to impose and USUALLY I remember to get the answers I want.

Make sure you note down what the answers are so that you remember once you leave the office. Don't get back home and then say to your self, "What'd the doctor say?"

Ask for every pathology report and every lab report and make sure you understand what they say. If they send them to you in the mail, call the doctor's office and ask for 5 or 10 minutes on the phone to get an explanation.

===

Craig,

I know you know this stuff, you've suggested it here before, as have I.

I'm glad you did't take offense, still I feel I should formally apologize.

You have my apologies.
Alan

mhc4165
Posts: 46
Joined: Dec 2008

 

I recently found this great information online it's all about detailed descriptions with images of common benign and cancerous ultrasound thyroid features. It's by radiologist Dr.Jill Langer from University of Penn. The last date of one of her references was from 2010. It says that taller than wide shape is more common with thyroid cancers under 10mm.

 

 

mhc4165
Posts: 46
Joined: Dec 2008

 

The big problem with the ultrasound features is that it's not reliable enough either because both cancereous and benign nodules have some overlapping features. The site below explains that most hypoechoic nodules are benign even though it's a common thyroid cancer feature,it also explains that about 10% of the time the results are noted to be suspicious or indeterminate and many of these are found to be cancers on follow up.

 

Well known endocrinologist Dr. Daniel S.Duick said to me in an email in 2009 that ultrasound findings suggestive of thyroid cancer are 25 to 60% specific (I'm not sure if he meant my ultrasound features,which at the time my isthmus nodule was still stable in size and non-hypervascular as the other two) and he said and that's why needle biopsy is used with only 2% mistake rate and he said he hopes this helps.

 

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