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Stage 3 and 4 diagnosis

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I'm a uterine stage 3C cancer survivor, approaching my 2-year marker post treatments. As my little mind starts churning on "will it come back or won't it", I thought I'd ask the LT Survivors a few questions.

What type of cancer, stage were you, did you have any recurrences, time frame from diagnosis and today and how are you doing today?

More curious then anything, as nice to read about some higher stage cancer survivors and how you're enduring life.

I've learned to take each day at a time and not let the little things upset me. Also my favorite book is THE ANTI CANCER....

Best to everyone...sending positive vibes~~~
Jan

Marcia527's picture
Marcia527
Posts: 2731
Joined: Jul 2006

I was breast cancer stage 3a diagnosed in 2003. My problems today are more connected to Parkinson's which I was diagnosed with in 2006.

I have a sister who had uterine cancer in 2002. She did not have it in the nodes and did not require any treatment other than surgery.

I also don't let things upset or worry me and try to make the most of each day.

Hugs,
marcia

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Thanks for your response!!! Glad to see you've a long survivor of breast cancer...excellent! Now getting hit with Parkinson isn't fun, but surely you're determined to get thru that target as well. My father had it and know today there's a lot more research and treatments vs. many years ago.

One thing I've learned so much of our path to health is determined first in our minds. I'm a huge believe in being positive and thinking my body to be healed and void of cancer. Great book/CD I'd recommend, THE SECRET. Just learned from another cancer survivor a good book, THE SPONTANEOUS HEALING OF BELIEF, Gregg Braden (check both out on www.Youtube. If we keep our minds positive we have a better chance of getting thru the journey and in fact, we can enjoy it a bit more.

As the sign reads in my chiropractor's office --

WORRY IS LIKE A ROCKING CHAIR, GOES BACK AND FORTH AND BACK AND FORTH!!!!\

Enjoy the day,
Jan

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1528
Joined: Mar 2010

Diagnosed April 2007. Had multiple surgeries and chemos (intraperitoneal and systemic.) Treatment completed April, 2008. So far, no recurrences, and being given every indication of a good long term prognosis. I'm fully active, and doing great.

Alice

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Have you done anything to change your lifestyle, such as exercise, new ways of eating, less stress, alternatives with supplements, etc, etc. Curious...

Congrat's to you for 3 years NED...that's something to truly celebrate.

Enjoy,
Jan

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

My naturopath had stage IV ovarian cancer 20 years ago. She did not follow standard treatment, no surgery, no chemo, but got her tumors under control through diet, lifestyle, and integrative therapies, like high dose vitamin C. She is currently very healthy, despite the fact that her tumors remain. She keeps them in check by following a very expanded version of the concepts presented in Anti-cancer.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I'd love to hear about her integrative therapies and high doses of Vitamin C. I do know so much of what we put in and on outside of our bodies has affect on our health.

Jan

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

Jan,
I follow much of the same plan as my naturopath, as I was diagnosed with stage IIIc ovarian cancer two years ago. From what I have seen, read, and experienced first hand, integrative treatment improves treatment results and post treatment success. Here are a few things you might want to research:
High dose IV vitamin C - From 60 to 75 grams of IVC. It boosts the immune system, and, if cancer cells are present, these cells absorb the vitamin C, which turns into hydrogen peroxide within the cell, thus killing the cancer cell
Curcumin - an extract from turmeric, reduces inflammation
Melatonin (20 mg.) - restricts blood supply to cancer cells
Diet - Organic, hormone-free, antibiotic-free, only free range, grass fed meat. NO SUGAR!!! I follow a similar diet to that outlined in the book Anti-cancer
Supplements - there are so many that help fight cancer, I could not list them here. There are some to avoid, however, such as iron and copper.
The five things to regulate are:
blood glucose
hormones (including things that look like hormones, such as plastics from water bottles and food containers)
inflammation
stress
blood supply to the tumor
Some other things I'm using are Haelan 951 and Iscador
This should keep you busy for awhile!

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1266
Joined: Nov 2001

I was stage 3 c colon ca ,into 6/13 lymph nodes. Have been ca free for 13yrs 7 mos. Suffering long term effects of chemo. Mostly auto-immune problems with joints,lungs and kidneys.
Ron.

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

There is a book called "Cancer: 50 Essential things to do." I was written by a man who was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. He went out and interviewed long term survivors to see what it was that they were doing. The book is a compilation of what he learned.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Sounds like a very interesting book...as I'll have to check into it. Always up for what others are doing to concur this cancer. My library is full of all kinds of books and this might be another good addition.

Take care,
Jan

Ladymonk
Posts: 13
Joined: Jul 2011

For Jazzy1 and others, if it offers anything worthwhile:
I was diagnosed with uterine ca when I found a lump under left arm. Thought it was breast cancer, but biopsy showed it was not the primary. It originated in the uterus, spread to abdomen, chest, neck & left axilla. This was in the 1980s. I had a ton of chemo & radiation (a lot stronger and more primitive stuff then), achieved a partial remission. Repeated treatments several months later, and the remission attained was pretty promising, as far as could be determined. And yes, it returned- regularly, every few months, at least yearly, for nearly 9 years. I can't count how much chemo, radiation, surgery, etc, I've had without referring to the pages and pages of files in our attic. I think I've had most of the acronyms of the time- VBM, MOPP, etc. I've had "superradiation" for "hot spots", and a whole lot of other stuff that wasn't fun. But the point is this: after all those years of treatment, during the last round of chemo & radiation, it went into remission and just never returned. No magic bullet, it was really just one more round of crap, to achieve yet another remission. I have had no evidence of recurrence since 1992.

All that being said, I offer the following to you, although your cancer is different from mine, or the next person's- you are uniquely you: For a long time, you will question every ache, every cough, every headache, etc, that comes along. You will be in hyper-vigilance for quite a while. Embrace it- it's your body's way of protecting you. You may feel like the neighborhood neurotic for a while, but follow up on anything that worries you. In time, with each success, this will recede. But for now, it is really your brain's way of taking care of your body. If you learn some stress management techniques, it will help you to cope rationally with this markedly altered lifestyle. Networking with others who have walked your walk will help, as will prayer, massage therapy, yoga, hobbies, etc.

Do you remember when you were first diagnosed, when suddenly every moment became so much more precious? I recall getting up really early at times to sit on a rock at the ocean (I lived in Maine then), just to watch the sunrise over the water. I didn't know how many more I'd get to see, and each experience became a lot more special. I remember promising myself that, if I were allowed to live, I would never lose that sense of wonder again, that every moment would be savored, every relationship cherished. Unfortunately, after nearly 20 years, life has become "business as usual", and I take things for granted and gripe about stuff as much as anyone. Maybe that's a good sign... And yes, I've had a pretty fair amount of after effects from treatment, mainly pain issues and a few cardiac, thyroid, stuff, (lots of stuff to gripe about!) but the gifts far outweigh the disadvantages. I have seen my children grown, educated, launched, married, I have been present at the births of many grandchildren. 13 years ago I met and married a remarkable man who has been my rock. Life is good, whether it lasts for six more months or fifty years...

When I was in the early stages of "terminal", a dear friend came to see me and made all the difference. I was very angry, you see, striking out at anyone and everyone. I had three young kids and was in the middle of a divorce (ex hubby couldn't deal with a sick wife), and I was pretty ticked off at the world. I was angry at old people, because I would never get to grow old. I was angry at a friend attending her daughter's wedding, because I knew I wouldn't get to do this with my own. I was, most of all, angry at this evil thing eating at my body and robbing me of time. My friend came and sat me down and this is essentially what he said: "Yep, they told you that you probably won't live much longer. There are a lot of things you cannot control any more. But there is one thing over which you have total control: You can continue being a (bleep) and leave your kids with sorrowful things to recall of your last weeks or months together. Or, you can use this time to build beautiful memories to sustain them when you are gone from them. The choice is yours." I have never forgotten that day; it was my watershed. And it was the day that I decided to begin to fight this disease. And attitude, my dear fellow traveler, is absolutely everything.

Sorry this is so long. It's my first post. I taught nursing for years, don't know when to shut up (*grin*). I wish you well, and would be happy to communicate...

ps- don't be afraid to use complementary and/or integrative medicine, just don't abandon the scientific mainstream stuff. I have used Laetrile in Mexico, direct injection of chemotoxic drugs into tumors in Germany, yoga and reiki, massage therapy, visualization techniques, etc. Who knows what worked? Does it matter? Nutrition is imperative- even if you don't feel like eating, do. I lived on smoothies for ages, with organic yogurt, and lots of fruits & veggies, fresh seafood (hey, we lived in Maine!) long before we understood antioxidants and omega 3s. Just be sure that your physicians know everything you are taking.

New Flower
Posts: 3938
Joined: Aug 2009

Ladymonk
Thank you for your powerful story I am a 3 years survivor from stage III C breast cancer I am doing well, your thoughts have resonated to my own feeling, especially about appreciation for every day and every person. I think lately my husband and I have lost that sense of wonder it is exactely how I feel, the sense of wonder about the world. Is it normal?
Congratulations on your 20 years. Please come back
New Flower

NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 402
Joined: Mar 2013

Ladymonk, I have started to stray from the gynecological cancer boards and see what else is out here. At the first gyn/onc appointment after finishing all my treatment I asked to speak to the chemo nurse who originally walked me through the chemicals and then had taken a leave to have a baby.  I waited for her to show me the pictures of her new little baby and his big sister.  (Even though I don't have any of my own, babies are always such a sign of HOPE for me)  Before I left she had some wise parting words to me, "GO OUT AND LIVE LIFE!"    

She is right and your words are spot on too.

tko683
Posts: 257
Joined: Aug 2011

New here....I do love seeing survivors of stage 3 and 4 cancer also. I was diagnosed in 2004 and am doing well. I agree that nutrition is key. I take vitamins, drink green tea everyday, and try to exercise everyday. Managing stress is also very importand, sometimes easier said than done but I love getting massages whenever I can. My husband was just diagnosed with stage 4 cancer so my stress level is very high right now. I try always read about new alternative treatments so I know what is going on in the world of cancer. Hugs to everyone.

AnneBehymer's picture
AnneBehymer
Posts: 739
Joined: Jul 2011

Hi,

I am stage 4 ovarian cancer I went to the ER on June 4th because I had been sick for three months. I thought I had pneumonia and found out I had cancer and reading each of your post give me hope that I can beat this beast. Thank you all for sharing your stories.

Anne

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Believe in hope as that seems to get many of us thru our journey.....to good places!!

I've always been a very, very positive thinker and know being down pulls our bodies downward and into not good places. If nothing else when thinking upward, we feel good no matter what the outcome.

One thing I've seen thru my journey, more and more people with stage 3 and 4 living and living longer lives. We can endure and must believe it will happen.

One area that I've worked on over past 6 months....slowing down and destressing my mind, which slows down my body. If we're stressed our immune systems are compromised, open us up to disease. Not worth it!

Good book I'd highly recommend --- GETTING WELL AGAIN, by O. Carl Simonton, MD

Peace~
Jan

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 5636
Joined: Apr 2009

I agree with what Jan just said, trying to keep a positive out look no matter how bad something might seams with help your body stay stronger. I also do a lot of praying to me it gives me the strength I need day to day. We are all here with you in your fight as well

Wishing you the best
╠╣ONDO

TealGladiator
Posts: 3
Joined: Oct 2013

Very inspiring stories in this thread. Mom is stage 4 Primary Peritoneal. I pray every day that she will be able to share her story as a survivor one day too.

 

pinky104
Posts: 46
Joined: Feb 2013

I am a stage IVb UPSC survivor.   I was diagnosed at the end of March in 2010, had my surgery in May of 2010, and started 6 rounds of carbo/taxol in June of 2010 and finished it in Sept., 2010.  I've had no reoccurrences, thank God. I'm 65 years old now and other than aches and pains and a few minor other health problems, I'm doing well. My cancer had spread to both ovaries, the omentum, and the ilium, but not to any lymph nodes.  It was considered stage IV because it had gone out of the pelvis. 

I want to tell you that I always enjoy what you have to say on the uterine cancer discussion board.  You give very good advice. You've helped a lot of people.  I actually thought you had survived uterine cancer longer than I have from all the knowledge you impart to everyone. 

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1266
Joined: Nov 2001

    Colon cancer back in 1998. I have had no recurrance since and am into my sixteenth year of survival. I may not have had cancer but my treatment insured a host of medical problems of an auto-immune nature. I have severe motor-sensori peripheral neuropathy,severe psoriatic arthritis and nephrotic syndrome. Ron.

RosePenny
Posts: 1
Joined: Jul 2014

I am three years out from having the diagnosis of stage 3a Triple Negative Breast Cancer. 5 lymph nodes positive, with a 5.5 centimer lump. The cancer metatized to my right lung last year. My medical team did surgery and were going to resection my right lower lobe, but the lab test  came back as lung cancer while I was on the table. I woke up to being told I had lung cancer, and they had removed my whole lower right lung lobe. Later lab tests showed it was a bc lung met. Go figure. I didn't have chemo afterwards, as my oncologist was hopeful this was the only spread. He and I wanted to keep chemo in reserve, since it is pretty well the only option for triple negative cancers.

A year later, and my last test came back clear. I feel happy yet scared, as I am under no treatment other than living as healthy as I can... Scans every six months as a reminder, and some other health issues from the surgery and chemo. I hope to become a very long time survivor!

 

hugs Rose

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