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Bindweed = natural anti-angiogenic treatment

LaundryQueen's picture
LaundryQueen
Posts: 682
Joined: Mar 2011

I got a new book today (Defeat Cancer, by Connie Strasheim) & learned about bindweed used by Dr. Julian Kenyon in his integrative cancer clinic in London, England. The herb is available online in the US & is called VascuStatin.

Here's the link to more info (I think it is expensive but nothing compared to the cost of Avastin):

http://www.organic-pharmacy.com/VascuStatin.htm#Education

LQ

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

I could just go in my front yard and graze.

Mum2bellaandwilliam's picture
Mum2bellaandwilliam
Posts: 414
Joined: Oct 2010

Lol , I was thinking the same !!!!! heheheheh , I need to go and rip it out, mmmmmmmm, My job for today attacking the Bindweed.Wish me luck.

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

Hold on there, ladies! I checked this out and, apparently, bindweed isn't safe to just throw into a salad.

Bindweed has some "toxic alkaloids" in it that are removed when it is sold as a supplement. On the other hand, the Native Americans used to use it so there must have been some level of safety with the raw material. On the web site, there is an anecdotal story of a woman with ovarian cancer who was using the product and was a nine-year survivor at the time she went into the Riordan Clinic to promote the stuff.

Carolen

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

I wasn't really planning to eat the stuff. It sounds as if it affects the immune system in a similar way to Iscador (mistletoe), which I will be starting on next week. As with bindweed, mistletoe is toxic and it must be administered properly.

Mum2bellaandwilliam's picture
Mum2bellaandwilliam
Posts: 414
Joined: Oct 2010

Lol, I did rip it out, but wasn't planning on feeding it to mum!!!!!!

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

BINDWEED (AN ANGIOGENESIS INHIBITOR)

Examples of Patient Reports From The Center

The RECNAC team (CANCER spelled backwards) is located in Wichita, KS, at The Center for the Improvement of Human Functioning International. A breast cancer survivor of 14 years, who used the Center's approach to fight her disease, altered the name to counter the grim aura that frequently hovers over cancer. Dr. Hugh D. Riordan, RECNAC Project Director, says the key to finding successful treatments for cancer is identifying where to look and being willing to search in unusual places. Dr. Riordan emphasizes the importance of finding ways to nurture and soothe the spirit of the cancer patient as well as the body. The Center, referred to as the Bright Spot for Health, has welcomed thousands of people from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 40 foreign countries. A hopeful, confident clinical environment tends to assure patients and expedite recovery.

Impressive cancer research is emanating from the Midwest, more specifically Wichita and physician/researcher Hugh Riordan, M.D., and his corroborating team of scientists. The following narrative illustrates why many in the scientific community are excited about their work.

A survivor of ovarian cancer entered the clinic relaying a hopeful story concerning her recovery. Following diagnosis, the woman, concerned with orthodox therapies, independently sought an alternative treatment. The decision to look elsewhere was not difficult because the woman's mother had died 7 years earlier with the same disease and doctors felt the daughter's chances of survival equally bleak.

The woman traveled to Oklahoma where a shaman gave her a tincture of Bindweed (Convolulus arvensis) with instructions to use the substance daily. (Bindweed, a common garden weed, is a bane to farmers.) The woman testified that after using Bindweed for 1 year, her abdomen returned to a normal size. Asymptomatic, she returned to her physician, who after a battery of tests pronounced her cancer-free.

The Riordan team began assays to determine the beneficial properties of Bindweed. Its mode of operation was puzzling because it appeared ineffective at killing tumor cells and only modestly efficient at improving immune function. After nearly 4 years of searching, it was determined that Bindweed bestows its antitumor advantage by inhibiting angiogenesis, a process that restrains (tumor) blood vessel formation. A chaotic vascular system is a common property of malignant tissue. So important is the blood vessel network, tumor cells participate in their own survival by secreting cytokines that develop and sustain the vascular pipeline. Tumor growth requires an adequate supply of blood vessels; robbed of its vascular system, the tumor starves and shrinks and, in some cases, completely disappears. It was determined that Bindweed was about 100 times more effective than shark cartilage (by weight) at inhibiting angiogenesis (Meng et al. 2002).

After identifying proteoglycan molecules (PGMs) as the antitumor property in Bindweed, the chicken egg chorio-allantoic membrane model was used to determine the extent of Bindweed's antiangiogenic activity. About 200 fertilized chicken eggs were prepared to allow a working surface inside the egg. Tumor cells were added that secrete cytokines, eliciting new tumor blood vessel growth. The angiogenesis inhibiting substance was then added and the rate and degree of angiogenesis observed. Scientists concluded that proteoglycan molecules inhibited new tumor blood vessels in a dose dependent manner, that is, results were 18%, 55%, and 73% inhibition at concentrations of 50, 100, and 200 mcg, respectively (Meng et al. 2002).

PGMs were then tested in animal models. B16 melanoma, LS180 (a colon adenocarcinoma), and Lewis Lung carcinoma all showed from 70%-99.5% inhibition of growth. The RECNAC team classed Bindweed as an all-tumor inhibitor, meaning it appears equally effective in inhibiting the progression of all tumors.

The RECNAC team found that when Bindweed was used with an immune stimulant, that is, a nontoxic purified extract of the bacterial cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria and beta 1, 3-glucan, the results were even more remarkable. The combination, referred to as a Muramyl Polysaccharide-Glycan Complex (MPGC), stimulates the immune system in a fashion not unlike that observed when Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), inactivated tuberculosis germ, is used to combat cancer. The muramyl peptides are recognized by the immune system as belonging to a bacterial invader; subsequently, the immune system is activated, mustering a nonspecific attack against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and cancerous cells (Pabst et al.1999). To increase the response, the peptides are linked to mannose-rich polysaccharides, which make it easier for the macrophages to engulf the cell wall for identification and immune activation.

The macrophages are also sensitized to phosphatidylserine and muramic acid, both of which are found preferentially on tumor cells. In essence, the immune system becomes flagged by the identifiable characteristics of the cancer cells and subsequently eliminates the cancer cells.

Muramyl peptides increase tumor destroying mechanisms and up-regulate monocyte cytokine genes (IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-12) (Allison 1997). Although IL-12 is an immune stimulator, it is one of the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors known (Morini et al. 2004;
Strasly et al. 2001).

Note: Pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in a number of different cancers, even proving predictive of survival. This raises questions regarding safe usage of natural agents that elicit production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

According to Dr. C.A. Dinarello (University of Colorado), most of our knowledge regarding pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1 or TNF) is derived from experiments in which humans or animals have been injected with either a single or a combination of inflammatory cytokines (Dinarello 1997). However, in models of inflammation where several cytokines are produced, specific blockade of either IL-1 or TNF (or both) results in a reduction in the severity of inflammation. This may explain the success of agents that lift expression of many of the family of cytokines, both pro- and anti-inflammatory in nature. Please refer to the section entitled Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in the protocol on Cancer Treatment: The Critical Factors, to learn about the role of cytokines in malignancies.

In addition, MPGC results in the maturation of immature dendritic cells. This is significant because immature dendritic cells initiate the immune response by engulfing abnormal cells. After identifying the foreign antigen, dendritic cells mature to present the information to T-cells to initiate the fight. Unfortunately, cancer cells possess a survival wit, that is, they can hide from the immune system by lacking identifiable antigens on their cell surfaces; the task becomes doubly difficult as some cancers can suppress dendritic cell maturation. Please consult the Cancer Vaccines protocol to learn how dendritic cells can be trained to identify cancer cells and gear up an attack. The other component of MPGC is beta 1,3-glucan (made from fungus cell walls). Beta 1,3 D-glucan is independently able to increase the activity of macrophage, potentiating detoxification, internal hygiene, and defense against cancer cells.

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

Anti-Angiogenic, Anti-Tumor and Immunostimulatory Effects of a Non-Toxic Plant Extract (PGM)

Riordan NH, Meng X, Riordan HD.
Presented at Comprehensive Cancer Care 2000, Arlington, Virginia, June, 2000.

Abstract

Recruitment of new blood vessels plays a crucial role in tumor survival and growth. Several agents that act as angiogenesis inhibitors are currently being investigated as anti-tumor agents. Proteoglycan extract (PGM) was tested for anti-angiogenic, immunostimulatory, and anti-neoplastic activity. PGM is a non-toxic extract of the ubiquitous plant, Convolvulus arvensis. In the chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay PGM inhibited new blood vessel growth in a dose dependent manner. Results were 18, 55, and 73% inhibition at concentrations of 50, 100, and 200 mcg. respectively. PGM significantly inhibited tumor growth in the mouse fibrosarcoma (S­180 Kun Ming 3-4 week old mixed male/female, 10 animals per group, 2501000 mcg. daily doses for 14 days), and mouse Lewis Lung Carcinoma (C57, 6 wk old mixed male/female, 10 animals per group, 2501000 mcg. Daily doses for 14 days) models. Inhibition (5477% inhibition by weight compared to controls, up to 96.8% by cellular composition) occurred regardless of route of administration: intravenous, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and oral. PGM induced lymphocyte growth in a dose dependent manner. The ability of PGM-treated phagocytes to phagocytose yeast cells was 85% greater than controls. We conclude that PGM is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor that has immunostimulatory activity in vitro and anti-tumor activity in vivo and that PGM should be studied further as an antineoplastic agent.

Background

Every aspect of tumor growth requires vascular growth. In 1971 Folkman hypothesized that controlling angiogenesis could be a feasible anti-tumor strategy. Recently the description of angiostatin and endostatin has resulted in increased interest in angiogenesis inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

Because of an anecdotal report of complete remission in a case of human ovarian carcinoma after consumption of 'an extract of the ubiquitous plant Convolvulus arvensis, we tested extract of this plant for anti-angiogenesis and immune stimulating effects.

Convolvulus arvensis is well known to contain toxic alkaloids. Therefore, in this study we examined a high molecular weight water extract of the plant that does not contain appreciable concentrations of alkaloids, which are depleted in the manufacturing process. The extract is primarily comprised of proteoglycan molecules and is herein referred to as PGM.

Summaries of Animal & Human Studies

See following pages for summaries and results of several significant animal and human studies conducted by the above researchers

Researchers' Conclusion

Research has been presented demonstrating that an extract of the plant Convolvulus arvensis has potent angiogenesis inhibiting and immune-stimulating qualities. This extract also demonstrated anti-tumor effects in two mouse tumor models. The exact details regarding the anti-angiogenesis mechanism of bindweed extract are not completely understood. This extract should be studied further to elucidate its anti tumor effects and mechanisms of action.

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

This article ties together many pieces I have heard about that are said to be effective in fighting cancer. Now I better understand how they work. Thanks Carolen.

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

This is an update to this thread:

I found a source of the stuff called MPGC (which is supposed to be synergistic with VascuStatin--aka bindweed). It's made by the same company that makes VascuStatin--Allergy Research Group. Why didn't I think of checking into that sooner?

The name of the product is "Imm-Kine" and it is available online. I'm gonna add that to my supplement list & see what happens next.

LaundryQueen's picture
LaundryQueen
Posts: 682
Joined: Mar 2011

Don't be surprised if your CA-125 goes UP! I've been using the bindweed with Imm-Kine & didn't realize that a rise in CA-125 could be an indication that the combo is working!

I read some postings from women on Avastin and saw that some women got an increase in CA-125 that was temporary (from tumor die off). I went on IPT chemo anyway because my PET scan still showed peritoneal nodules splattered hither and yon.

Another thing I noticed is that if I increase the dose of the bindweed (Vascustatin) from 4 capsules to 5 or 6 capsules, I get diarrhea--something that is common with the anti-angiogenic drugs.

Carolen: I thought I already told you where to find Imm-Kine--in the future, I should probably post on the discussion board too. I can't say if the Vascustatin & ImmKine are doing anything positive; however, I still feel pretty good overall. I just wish I had x-ray vision so I could see what was going on in my belly. Hahahahahahaha!

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