CSN Login
Members Online: 18

appendix connection

eward
Posts: 210
Joined: Feb 2010

Westie just mentioned the appendix connection with PPC in her post. I am wondering how many PPC survivors have a ruptured appendix in their past?

My mom nearly died when she was 4 years old (61 years ago) due to a ruptured appendix. For some reason, the appendix was not removed at that time. Then at age 30(ish), she had her second rupture and when the appendix was removed, there was gangrene and everything. Low and behold, when mom's stage IV PPC was diagnosed 2+ years ago, her 3 small tumors were located where her appendix had been removed. (There was also a grain-like smattering of cancer in her peritoneal area and cancerous pleural effusion.)

Anyone else with this connection?

Eileen

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1528
Joined: Mar 2010

My ruptured (and re-healed) appendix was found during my "routine" hysterectomy where cancer of appendiceal origin was found surrounding my ovary, and seeded throughout my peritoneum. Thus my peritoneal cancer is of appendiceal origin.

There are also many Appendix Cancer patients who have Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP); a cancerous jelly that fills the peritoneum, and is of appendix origin.

Our treatments tend to follow the colorectal cancer chemos. IP/HIPEC chemo is common, and systemic chemo, if given, is usually Folfox or a variation thereof.

wanttogetwellsoon
Posts: 147
Joined: Apr 2011

I had a ruptured appendix in 1990 caused by a burst ectopic pregancy and the subsequent bacterial infections which set up in the abdomen. However, hey've told me that they think it might have been caused by TB in the fallopian tube which I may have had as a child. There's evidence for that but I don't think I'll ever find out for sure.

Sue

eward
Posts: 210
Joined: Feb 2010

already 2 others with an appendix connection.

AussieMaddie's picture
AussieMaddie
Posts: 345
Joined: May 2011

Hi Eileen,

no, not here, but it will make interesting comparisons for others. I expected that my own cancer may have been precipitated by binge eating, but so far nothing on that connection.

AussieMaddie

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Aussie Maddie: Binge eating? Now that is a different one to hear about. Can you explain a bit more? It is certainly possible given the irritation to the entire gastro system!
Cheryl

AussieMaddie's picture
AussieMaddie
Posts: 345
Joined: May 2011

Hi Cheryl,

I have a lifelong history of mental disturbance brought on, it would seem, by a traumatic episode in my childhood. I see an excellent psychiatrist who specializes in trauma, but it's hard to see her since I've had the cancer.

My binge eating is really part of the larger picture of mental/emotional defences. There is also a name for it now - Binge Eating Disorder. It was the last of the eating disorders to be added to the list of those (I think even now it is listed as a subcategory of bulimia - which I'm here to tell you is *totally* wrong. The only thing which the two diagnoses have in common is the binge eating, but bulimics have a need to keep slim so they vomit after eating, take laxatives to get it out of their system or even go for periods excessively exercising (like anorexics)

People with Binge Eating Disorder have at heart *no* wish to be slim. They may say that they want to be, but the bottom line is that the need *not* to be slim outweighs (no pun intended) any desire to maintain a healthy weight. It's pure defence, and it works well in that regard. When it is completely out of control it's also a compulsive habit a bit in the manner of someone who has obsessive compulsive disorder. I don't have OCD but I'm certainly obsessive in a number of ways. Eating is just one of them. It's a particularly self-harming way, sadly. And yet, I've never been one to self-harm through cutting for example. No interest in that at all. Neither have I ever been suicidal, though my eating constantly in huge quantities will probably bring about my death probably before the cancer does. The difference between overeating (which I do too) and binge eating is that when you binge, you lose all sense of everything else except the desparate need to eat, even if your body is telling you that it is painfully full.

Generally, when I binge eat, it is to meet sensual or emotional need, and the only time I stop eating is when my stomach is so distended that I can not longer feel anything. It really does have a numbing effect. I suppose in that respect, it acts a lot like other emotion-numbing drugs, such as alchohol or, for others, compulsive gambling etc. You lose all sense of anything else in the world. You are fully consumed (again, no pun) by that need in the moment, nothing else registers.

It is totally controlling.

It's a psychiatric problem, not a dietary one. That's one issue that's not generally well understood by many people. As it happens, it fits my primary psychiatric diagnosis very well (forgive me but I don't want to got there however; it's enough that I deal with it. I get support for that too)

Hope that helps to clarify binge eating for you Cheryl :)

AussieMaddie

Tina Brown's picture
Tina Brown
Posts: 1054
Joined: Nov 2009

I have read your recent post and I never understood how an eating disorder could be so compelling and so overwhelming that it takes over your whole life. I used to think (my own naivety) that is was greed or a weak will power that lead some one to binge or over eat. However after reading your post it makes much more sense.

My sister eats when she is emotionally upset as it gives her comfort. I understand, like alcohol, that it does give an instant sense of satisfaction. I would never presume to judge anyone who finds comfort and solace in something. We are all human with needs and if we can find something to help us along our sometimes difficult lives then who has the right to say it is wrong.

I have used alcohol on occasions to blot out a massive hurt in my life. But unfortunately all it ever did was to give me a temporary relief as once the effects have worn off the hurt is still there.

It has taken me nearly 3 years to come to terms with my sadness and realise that alcohol is not my friend and that I need to take control over something in my life so I can feel a sense of being ME. My life and my body is mine and I have the power to do whatever I like to it. So after nearly 3 years I have chosen to TRY to do something positive. I know i have cancer and that it can't be cured, but I can live well with it.

So I have joined a slimming club (I am 2 stone overweight & I hate it)
I have gone back to my running club and eventhough I can't run very well it is a start
I have gone back to swimming.

You see I want to be the same as I was 3 years ago. I know it is going to be a hard journey but I must try.

I am not a strong person. I get so scared sometimes and the fear inside of me is unexplanable. But I WILL NOT LIE DOWN AND LET THE CANCER WIN.

You are not alone. We are all her on this board for one reason and that is to support each other. Please keep writing.

Love Tina xx

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Tina: Sorry, it isn't me with the binge eating but what an interesting connection to this cancer. Right now though while I'm on an enforced BRAT diet to control the serious diarrhea I'm having with the irenotecan, I crave all the bad foods like pizza and hot dogs and hamburgers and milk shakes! Luckily the pizza seems to be OK (not the rest though!)! I don't know whether it is a craving because my body isn't getting anything much at all from the BRAT diet (bananas, white rice, applesauce, dry white bread) and needs something like fat or what. On the other hand, this chemo regime has made me lose 30 lbs and I like that!
Cheryl

AussieMaddie's picture
AussieMaddie
Posts: 345
Joined: May 2011

I have to smile when I read what foods you have to eat on your BRAT diet Cheryl, because they're the foods which are often considered "bad" foods (white, refined bread and rice for example). My heart goes out to you for not being able to eat a varied diet, and especially if you can't eat fats at all.

But then I was kept on a diet when I was in hospital and it didn't bother me. The only thing I craved was fluid. I was on only one litre of fluid a day (including any kind of foods that contained fluid) in order not to build up the ascites in my abdomen. I was also on very high dosees of fluid tablets at the same time. Obviously, it caused a big problem with constipation at the time, which settled down only when the fluid tablets were reduced. (I had never previously thought that fluid tablets could cause constipation). That was all before they would drain my abdomen. I asked why they wouldn't drain it earlier and was told that it would just build up again very quickly and they were more concerned at me stopping from making it at that time.

What does BRAT stand for?

Thanks,

AussieMaddie

AussieMaddie's picture
AussieMaddie
Posts: 345
Joined: May 2011

For a woman who describes yourself as not being a strong person, you come across to me as someone who is strong for others if not for yourself. Your words and your example empower others here on the board Tina. You have strength enough to keep us all feeling better for just having you here :)

I'm glad if can accomplish, even a little at a time, something positive for yourself.

Take good care,

AussieMaddie

daBeachBum's picture
daBeachBum
Posts: 164
Joined: Apr 2011

I am bumping this up for Mitch (mmikesell)

AussieMaddie's picture
AussieMaddie
Posts: 345
Joined: May 2011

Sorry, but I don't know what 'bumping up' means.

AussieMaddie

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1528
Joined: Mar 2010

Bumping is adding a comment so that this thread is moved to the top of the list.

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi: Yup, I know - I'd never eat those things in quantity at any other time but it does work. BRAT stands for bananas, rice (white), apple sauce, and toast (dry white). I now put other "good" stuff in there and that works. Also I have a pizza every now and again!
Chryl

AussieMaddie's picture
AussieMaddie
Posts: 345
Joined: May 2011

:)

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network