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Aspirin and tumeric

Lilmiss82's picture
Lilmiss82
Posts: 253
Joined: Dec 2009

Ok with the news I got the other day I am ready to try anything do anything to help destroy/obliterate these dirty cells from seeding and making any new growths in my body. My question is, I started taking tumeric and was wondering if I can also take aspirin with it?? I am juicing again as of yesterday ( I use to do it all the time in the summer but stopped I do not know why) and I do accupunture and will speak to my accupunturist regarding these new nodules and hopefully get some new herbs to kill this cancer. Today I decided cancer picked the wrong person to mess with. Do you guys suggest I add anything to my arsenal? -Melissa

lisa42's picture
lisa42
Posts: 3663
Joined: Jul 2008

Hi,

A while ago when I first started taking turmeric, I mentioned it to the oncology nurse practitioner & I was told that turmeric can further thin your blood, so you need to be careful to not take another blood thinner on a regular basis. I don't think it'd be a big problem to take an occasional aspirin or ibuprofen (also can thin blood) for pain occasionally. But you shouldn't be taking both turmeric and aspirin together on a regular basis. You should ask your doctor about it, but that is what I was told.

I like hearing the fight in your attitude- that's what got me going finally on trying some additional things. Something that I also take daily is cimetidine (also known as Tagamet, the antacid). There was a study that was on stage I and II patients who just had their colon resection. For a year after their surgery, half the group was on Xeloda alone. The other half was on Xeloda and cimetidine (800 mg/day). The group that took the daily cimetidine in addition to the Xeloda had far less recurrences than the group that took Xeloda alone. I don't remember the actual statistic amount, but it was pretty significant (like close to 50% less recurrences than the Xeloda alone group). Supposedly it is believed that cimetidine keeps the cancer from spreading. My onc said since I'm stage IV and my cancer already had spread, that he didn't know what it would do, but it was worth taking and it hopefully would keep the cancer from spreading any further. Well, as I said, I'm stage IV, but I've been taking the cimetidine for two years now & my most recent scan has continued to show that my cancer has not spread to any other organs or places in my body than how it was upon diagnosis (in liver and lungs). I can't know if it's because of the cimetidine for sure or not, but I'm definitely going to continue to take it. You can get it fairly cheap in Walmart or most drugstores. It's sometimes harder to find because apparently Tagamet isn't the greatest antacid in the world, but it's still out there. I'm not using it for antacid purposes, of course.

Best wishes & fight on!
Lisa

Scambuster's picture
Scambuster
Posts: 975
Joined: Nov 2009

I think Turmeric is great stuff and is shown to make Chemo and rads more effective with lower dosages of Chemo as well as reduce some nasty side effects.

I have a long list of complementary things I take. Go to my CSN Space and see my 'Blog' and 'Expressions' pages for a list of stuff, some good articles & links etc.

Regds
Scambuster

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Warnings
Recent laboratory findings indicate that dietary turmeric may inhibit the anti-tumor action of chemotherapeutic agents such as cyclophosphamide in treating breast cancer. More research is necessary, but it is advisable for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy to limit intake of turmeric and turmeric-containing foods. (3)

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

blake,

obviously better to be safe than sorry.
awesome and thanks,

pete

lisa42's picture
lisa42
Posts: 3663
Joined: Jul 2008

It would sure be nice to know the truth on if these supplements help or inhibit the chemo from doing its thing! My onc told me I could go ahead and take my supplements, turmeric included, as long as I stopped 24 hrs before getting chemo and didn't resume again until 24 hrs after my 5FU pump is unhooked. For me this would mean (since I get chemo every other Tuesday), stopping my supplements Sunday night and then resuming again the following Friday evening. So, being on 2 week cycles, that allows me to take the supplements the Saturday following chemo through the following Sunday evening (8-9 days out of every 14).

Given my scan results, I don't know if I'm helping or hurting myself. I wish I could know for sure! The one thing that makes me think I'm not hurting myself with the supplements is that when I first started doing my cleanse/detox, I did it right through on my chemo days that time. I was worried, but then that week later was when I discovered my CEA went down 61 points- I don't think it would have done that if the supplements and detox was hurting the chemo effect.

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_109755.html

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin to protect against colorectal cancer may be effective, but mostly in people at increased risk for the disease due to elevated levels of an inflammatory biomarker in their blood, according to a new study.

luvmylife's picture
luvmylife
Posts: 80
Joined: Jun 2010

Melissa,
You have a great attitude and that is more than half the battle. I copied a post from the colonclub.com discussion board about aloe vera/water and honey. I ordered George's aloe vera juice for Jimmy from the vitamin shop and we all started to take it.
I am going to order manuka honey to go along with it. I figure it can't hurt and I don't think it effects the chemo. Read the post below and see what you think. I would be interested in others thoughts on this also. Again, God Bless you on this journey.

Jan
Post from another board:

"was at my Oncologist this morning, and she told me a story of one of her patients who has Stage IV colon cancer, with inoperable tumors, numerous mets to liver, etc. Apparently, he went through the folfox, xeloda, avastin and other chemotherapys. Nothing was helping. He took it upon himself to start a regimen of drinking Aloe Vera Juice, I believe it was as pure as possible if not a mix he did himself with the Aloe Vera Gel and water and honey, and at this point, he is NED for three years. So I get home and pop on the internet and find what seems like zillions of articles about Aloe Vera and cancer... talking about the anti-cancer properties and how it controls and shrinks tumors, as well as keeping the healthy cells healthy etc. I was blown away. It went on to say its used in treatment of cancer in animals. So what are we? So, has anyone tried Aloe Vera? I certainly am going to give it a try. Since the only possible side effects are nausea and diarrhea, I'm going to wait until I get through my first full dose of xeloda to make sure I dont mix up any side effects. Any input would be appreciated."

lisa42's picture
lisa42
Posts: 3663
Joined: Jul 2008

Aloe vera juice is something my ND also recommended to me. He has me taking the pure unsweetened, bitter version, as it is more potent. Tastes nasty, but you do get used to it. If the kind you take tastes sweet, then it is not as potent, supposedly. Mine tastes kind of like bitter and pickle juice in one. I take a tsp 3x a day after meals. My ND has me on it for the purpose of fighting off candida yeast and also to help fight against my sweet tooth. I have read the articles online about its anticancer qualities, but my ND did not mention it for that. My angle is that it probably can't hurt & hopefully will help.

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Sloan Kettering:

Warnings
Aloe vera gel should not be confused with aloe juice or aloe latex, both of which contain anthraquinone, a cathartic laxative. Aloe vera taken for internal use should be discouraged due to possible adverse effects and inconclusive clinical data. Aloe vera injections for cancer patients have resulted in several deaths.
The FDA rules that aloe is not safe as a stimulant laxative.
(14)

Adverse Reactions
Topical administration of aloe vera gel is considered safe but oral consumption of aloe can cause gastrointestinal upset and electrolyte abnormalities.
Inappropriate use of aloe vera supplements has been linked to thyroid dysfunction (10), acute hepatitis (11), and perioperative bleeding (12). Parenteral administration of aloe should be avoided due to potential toxicities and lack of clinical efficacy in humans.
A case of hypokalemia has been reported with use of aloe vera during chemotherapy (19).
Three cases of toxic hepatitis were reported following use of aloe preparations. Liver function was normalized after discontinuing aloe (22).

Herb-Drug Interactions
Oral
Glyburide: Aloe may increase hypoglycemic effects.
Diuretics: Aloe may have additive hypokalemic effect due to diarrhea if used for a prolonged period.
Digoxin: Aloe may have additive hypokalemic effect due to diarrhea if used for a prolonged period.
Topical
Hydrocortisone: Aloe may increase anti-inflammatory effects.
(15)
Sevoflurane:Aloe may have additive antiplatelet effect causing excessive bleeding during surgery. (12)

Cancer.org:

Overview
Available scientific evidence does not support claims that aloe can treat any type of cancer. In fact, used as a cancer treatment, aloe is dangerous and may even be deadly.

The gel inside aloe leaves may be effective in treating minor burns and skin irritations. There are mixed reports about its use as a laxative. Available scientific evidence does not support claims that aloe can treat any type of cancer. In fact, used as a cancer treatment, aloe is dangerous and may even be deadly.

How is it promoted for use?
Aloe juice or latex is used mostly for constipation, whereas aloe gel is used for skin conditions. However, proponents of alternative treatments claim aloe also boosts the immune system and acts directly on abnormal cells, thus preventing or treating cancer.

The main aloe product promoted as a cancer cure is an unapproved drug called T-UP, which comes in an oral form or can be injected. Aloe proponents claim it is effective against all types of cancer, including liver and prostate cancer, although available scientific evidence does not support these claims.

Lilmiss82's picture
Lilmiss82
Posts: 253
Joined: Dec 2009

Thanks for the advice. Currently I am not on chemo so I think it would be safe to take the tumeric but I won't combine it with aspirin. Haven't heard of the aloe and honey but I'm gonna look into that too. Thanks again :)Melissa

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Although Manuka honey is promoted to cancer patients, it is unclear if it has any anticancer effects. There is an ongoing trial of Manuka Honey's effect on oral mucositis following radiation therapy (19).

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

"This is very true because our FDA will not do any testing on it so scientific evidence would be kind of impossible. :)"

Graci,

Science is not under the control of the FDA, despite those who believe in the grand conspiracy.  

The FDA regulates vitamin and mineral supplements only if harm (or death) is reported.  It is an issue in the US that the supplement industry is essentially unregulated.  I can manufacture a pill, claim it is 40% turmeric, and not put any turmeric in it.

Here is a description of the legislation from Wikipedia:

The DSHEA (the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act), passed in 1994, was the subject of lobbying efforts by the manufacturers of dietary supplements and restricted the ability of the FDA to exert authority over supplements so long as manufacturers made no claims about their products treating, preventing or curing diseases. According to Consumer Reports, "The law has left consumers without the protections surrounding the manufacture and marketing of over-the-counter or prescription medications" and it became the FDA's responsibility to prove that a supplement wasn't safe. While pharmaceutical manufacturers must demonstrate their products are effective as well as being safe, supplement manufacturers are not required to demonstrate efficacy. The FDA has only ever found one dietary supplement to be unsafe, the weight loss/energy supplement ephedra.[16] Discussing the legislation, Time referred to the DSHEA as "ill-conceived and reprehensible", that "gives the industry virtually free reign [sic] to market products defined as dietary supplements, while severely limiting the FDA's ability to regulate them".[17] The DSHEA was heavily lobbied for by the supplement industry, and was criticized for exposing the public to worthless compounds that bilked consumers out of money to no benefit.[16][17] Because of the requirements put into place by the DSHEA, the FDA must demonstrate that individual supplements are unsafe using their adverse events reporting system, which it is estimated captures only 1% of all adverse events linked to supplements.[citation needed] The FDA has also lacked the funding to undertake the rigorous tests to meet the standards for a supplement to be considered "hazardous" and thus removed from the market; in the one situation where this standard was reached (ephedra), the agency faced significant opposition from the supplement industry and the United States Congress, instead limiting themselves to making announcements about problematic supplement safety records on their website.[18]

EddieB's picture
EddieB
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2011

You may wish to check out Essiac Tea. There is a GREAT deal of info on the internet, and was a proven cure for all types of cancer many years back.

You can google it, and find out much. It's inexpensive,hardly any taste to it, and many books state that many people were cured in years past.

I am a big proponent of nutritional supplements and alternative medicine.

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

contraindicated in case of any hepatic disease,!.
Hope it helped!

jscho
Posts: 62
Joined: Jun 2009

It is my understanding that just the opposite is true - curcumin is helpful in mitigating some types of liver disease by short-circuiting inflammation pathways (ppar-gamma inhibition of TNF-alpha induced inflammation). Here is a study on a potential mouse model of primary sclerosing cholangitis:
http://gut.bmj.com/content/59/4/521.full

It also seems to help liver damage from high levels of fructose in mice ("fatty liver"):
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20222050
as well as fibrosis in fatty liver disease:
http://endo.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/151/9/4168

A review article:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19811613

Overall, it seems to be a great supplement to combat both liver disease and cancer (which hijacks inflammation pathways).

Best,
Jeremy

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

Curcumin & Cancer

Also see commercial Turmeric Curcumin Supplements

Curcumin & Cancer - Clinical Summary

Derived from the rhizome and root. Turmeric is routinely used as a spice and coloring agent. Oral administration of turmeric is well tolerated, but bioavailability is relatively low (5) (15). Following absorption, turmeric is rapidly metabolized. In vitro and animal studies suggest anti-proliferative and preventative effects of turmeric against cancer (10) (11) (12) (13) (16) (17). Results from a pilot study indicate that turmeric, with its active ingredient curcumin, may help alleviate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (14). No significant adverse events have been reported. Patients with gastrointestinal disorders should not take curcumin. Recent animal studies indicate that dietary turmeric may inhibit the anti-tumor action of chemotherapeutic agents such as cyclophosphamide in treating breast cancer (3). More research is necessary, but it may be advisable for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy to limit intake of turmeric and turmeric-containing foods. Data from an epidemiological study are suggestive of improved cognitive performance in elderly Asians who consumed turmeric in the form of curry powder (18).

Purported Uses of Curcumin

* Cancer prevention
* Infections
* Inflammation
* Kidney stones
* Stomach and intestinal gas

Mechanism of Action ot Curcumin

The mechanism of action is not fully understood. Turmeric has anti-inflammatory and choleretic action. Anti-inflammatory action may be due to leukotriene inhibition. Its curcuminoids (curcumin) and volatile oil are both partly responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity. Curcuminoids induce glutathione S-transferase and are potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450. Turmeric acts as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant, inhibiting lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage. It also inhibits activation of NF-kB4, c-jun/AP-1 function, and activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. In vitro and animal models of breast cancer show turmeric may inhibit chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the JNK pathway and reactive oxygen species generation. The isolated constituent alpha r-turmerone has been shown to arrest the reproduction and slaughterer activity of human lymphocytes, which may contribute to its anti-inflammatory action. Curcumin is more effective by parenteral injection than by oral ingestion. Curcumin has displayed antitumor activity and may be protective against some cancers, such as colon cancer. In laboratory tests, curcumin's antitumor actions appear to be due to interactions with arachidonate metabolism and its in vivo antiangiogenic properties.

Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin

Bioavailability of curcumin is approximately 60-65% following oral administration. Metabolism is primarily via glucuronidation to glucuronide and glucuronide/sulfate metabolites (4). In vitro studies indicate inhibition of Cytochrome P450 1A1. Excretion of parent compound is primarily in the feces with metabolites present in the urine (5).

Warnings of Curcumin

Recent laboratory findings indicate that dietary turmeric may inhibit the anti-tumor action of chemotherapeutic agents such as cyclophosphamide in treating breast cancer. More research is necessary, but it may be advisable for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy to limit intake of turmeric and turmeric-containing foods. (3)

Contraindications of Curcumin

Patients with bile duct obstruction, gallstones, and GI disorders (including stomach ulcers and hyperacidity disorders) should not take curcumin(6).

Adverse Reactions of Curcumin

None known

Herb-Drug Interactions

Reserpine: Turmeric may reduce efficacy (7).
Indomethacin: Turmeric may reduce efficacy (7).
Anticoagulants / Antiplatelets: Turmeric may increase risk of bleeding (7).
Camptothecin: Turmeric inhibits camptothecin-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell lines in vitro (3).
Mechlorethamine: Turmeric inhibits mechlorethamine-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell lines in vitro (3).
Doxorubicin: Turmeric inhibits doxorubicin-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell lines in vitro (3).
Cyclophosphamide: Dietary turmeric inhibits cyclophosphamide-induced tumor regression in animal studies (3).

Literature Summary and Critique
Human data:
James J. Curcumin: clinical trial finds no antiviral effect. AIDS Treat News 1996;242:1.
A randomized study of 38 patients to either high-dose or low-dose turmeric powder. Following 8 weeks of treatment, there was no demonstrated effect of turmeric on HIV viral load. A small increase in CD4 cells in the high-dose group and a consistent fall of CD4 cells in the low-dose group were documented, but neither result was statistically significant. This report of an abstract presented at the third annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections demonstrated no efficacy of turmeric in treating HIV.

Animal / In vitro data:
Li JK, et al. Mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by curcumin. Proc Natl Sci Counc Repub China B 2001;25:59-66.
Curcumin has shown anti-carcinogenic activity in animals as indicated by its ability to block colon tumor initiation by azoxymethane and skin tumor promotion induced by phorbol ester TPA. Recently, curcumin has been considered by oncologists as a potential third-generation cancer chemopreventive agent, and clinical trials using it have been carried out in several laboratories. Curcumin possesses anti-inflammatory activity and is a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen-generating enzymes, such as lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase, xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Curcumin is also a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C and EGF-receptor tyrosine kinase. It is proposed that curcumin may suppress tumor promotion by blocking signal transduction pathways in the target cells.

Venkatesan N. Curcumin prevents adriamycin nephrotoxicity in rats. Br J Pharmacol 2000;129:231-4.
This study investigated the effect of curcumin on Adriamycin (ADR) nephrosis in rats. The results indicate that ADR-induced kidney injury was remarkably well prevented by treatment with curcumin. Treatment with curcumin markedly protected against ADR-induced proteinuria, albuminuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia. Curcumin restored renal function in ADR rats, as judged by the increase in GFR. The data also demonstrate that curcumin protects against ADR-induced renal injury by suppressing oxidative stress and increasing kidney glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity. This suggests that administration of curcumin is a promising approach in the treatment of nephrosis caused by ADR.

Kawamori T, et al. Chemopreventive effect of curcumin, a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, during the promotion/progression stages of colon cancer. Cancer Res 1999;59:597-601.
This study was designed to investigate the chemopreventive action of curcumin when administered (late in the premalignant stage) during the promotion/progression stage of colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats. The study also monitored the modulating effect of this agent on apoptosis in the tumors. The results showed that the administration of 0.2% curcumin during both the initiation and post initiation periods significantly inhibited colon tumorigenesis. In addition, administration of 0.2% and of 0.6% synthetic curcumin in the diet during the promotion/progression stage significantly suppressed the incidence and multiplicity of noninvasive adenocarcinomas and also strongly inhibited the multiplicity of invasive adenocarcinomas of the colon.

Mehta K, et al. Antiproliferative effect of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) against human breast tumor cell lines. Anticancer Drugs 1997;8:470-81.
The antiproliferative effects of curcumin against several breast tumor cell lines, including hormone-dependent, hormone-independent, and multidrug lines, were studied. Curcumin preferentially arrested cells in the G2/S phase of the cell cycle. Curcumin-induced cell death was due neither to apoptosis nor to a significant change in the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including Bcl-2 p53, cyclin B and transglutaminase.

Rao CV, et al. Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by dietary curcumin, a naturally occurring plant phenolic compound. Cancer Res 1995;55:259-66.
This study was designed to investigate the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis and the modulating effect of curcumin on the colonic mucosal and tumor phospholipase A2, phospholipase C gamma 1, lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenase activities in male F344 rats. The results indicate that the administration of curcumin significantly inhibited incidence of colon adenocarcinomas (p<0.004) and the multiplicity of invasive, non-invasive, and total adenocarcinomas. Curcumin also significantly suppressed the colon tumor volume by more than 57% compared to the control diet. Although the precise mechanism by which curcumin inhibits colon tumorigenesis remains to be elucidated, it is likely that the chemopreventive action, at least in part, may be related to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism.

References

1. Leung AY, et al. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics, 2nd ed. New York: Wiley; 1996.
2. Blumenthal, et al. Herbal Medicine, Expanded Commission E Monographs. Austin: American Botanical Council; 2000.
3. Somasundaram S, et al. Dietary curcumin inhibits chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in models of human breast cancer. Cancer Res 2002;62:3868-75.
4. Asai A, Miyazawa T. Occurrence of orally administered curcuminoid as glucuronide and glucuronide/sulfate conjugates in rat plasma. Life Sci 2000;67:2785-93.
5. Ravindranath V, Chandrasekhara N. Absorption and tissue distribution of curcumin in rats. Toxicology 1980;16:259-65.
6. McGuffin M, et al. American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook. Florida: CRC Press; 1997.
7. Brinker F. Herbal ContrCurcumin & Cancer

Also see commercial Turmeric Curcumin Supplements

Curcumin & Cancer - Clinical Summary

Derived from the rhizome and root. Turmeric is routinely used as a spice and coloring agent. Oral administration of turmeric is well tolerated, but bioavailability is relatively low (5) (15). Following absorption, turmeric is rapidly metabolized. In vitro and animal studies suggest anti-proliferative and preventative effects of turmeric against cancer (10) (11) (12) (13) (16) (17). Results from a pilot study indicate that turmeric, with its active ingredient curcumin, may help alleviate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (14). No significant adverse events have been reported. Patients with gastrointestinal disorders should not take curcumin. Recent animal studies indicate that dietary turmeric may inhibit the anti-tumor action of chemotherapeutic agents such as cyclophosphamide in treating breast cancer (3). More research is necessary, but it may be advisable for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy to limit intake of turmeric and turmeric-containing foods. Data from an epidemiological study are suggestive of improved cognitive performance in elderly Asians who consumed turmeric in the form of curry powder (18).

Purported Uses of Curcumin

* Cancer prevention
* Infections
* Inflammation
* Kidney stones
* Stomach and intestinal gas

Mechanism of Action ot Curcumin

The mechanism of action is not fully understood. Turmeric has anti-inflammatory and choleretic action. Anti-inflammatory action may be due to leukotriene inhibition. Its curcuminoids (curcumin) and volatile oil are both partly responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity. Curcuminoids induce glutathione S-transferase and are potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450. Turmeric acts as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant, inhibiting lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage. It also inhibits activation of NF-kB4, c-jun/AP-1 function, and activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. In vitro and animal models of breast cancer show turmeric may inhibit chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the JNK pathway and reactive oxygen species generation. The isolated constituent alpha r-turmerone has been shown to arrest the reproduction and slaughterer activity of human lymphocytes, which may contribute to its anti-inflammatory action. Curcumin is more effective by parenteral injection than by oral ingestion. Curcumin has displayed antitumor activity and may be protective against some cancers, such as colon cancer. In laboratory tests, curcumin's antitumor actions appear to be due to interactions with arachidonate metabolism and its in vivo antiangiogenic properties.

Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin

Bioavailability of curcumin is approximately 60-65% following oral administration. Metabolism is primarily via glucuronidation to glucuronide and glucuronide/sulfate metabolites (4). In vitro studies indicate inhibition of Cytochrome P450 1A1. Excretion of parent compound is primarily in the feces with metabolites present in the urine (5).

Warnings of Curcumin

Recent laboratory findings indicate that dietary turmeric may inhibit the anti-tumor action of chemotherapeutic agents such as cyclophosphamide in treating breast cancer. More research is necessary, but it may be advisable for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy to limit intake of turmeric and turmeric-containing foods. (3)

Contraindications of Curcumin

Patients with bile duct obstruction, gallstones, and GI disorders (including stomach ulcers and hyperacidity disorders) should not take curcumin(6).

Adverse Reactions of Curcumin

None known

Herb-Drug Interactions

Reserpine: Turmeric may reduce efficacy (7).
Indomethacin: Turmeric may reduce efficacy (7).
Anticoagulants / Antiplatelets: Turmeric may increase risk of bleeding (7).
Camptothecin: Turmeric inhibits camptothecin-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell lines in vitro (3).
Mechlorethamine: Turmeric inhibits mechlorethamine-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell lines in vitro (3).
Doxorubicin: Turmeric inhibits doxorubicin-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell lines in vitro (3).
Cyclophosphamide: Dietary turmeric inhibits cyclophosphamide-induced tumor regression in animal studies (3).

Literature Summary and Critique
Human data:
James J. Curcumin: clinical trial finds no antiviral effect. AIDS Treat News 1996;242:1.
A randomized study of 38 patients to either high-dose or low-dose turmeric powder. Following 8 weeks of treatment, there was no demonstrated effect of turmeric on HIV viral load. A small increase in CD4 cells in the high-dose group and a consistent fall of CD4 cells in the low-dose group were documented, but neither result was statistically significant. This report of an abstract presented at the third annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections demonstrated no efficacy of turmeric in treating HIV.

Animal / In vitro data:
Li JK, et al. Mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by curcumin. Proc Natl Sci Counc Repub China B 2001;25:59-66.
Curcumin has shown anti-carcinogenic activity in animals as indicated by its ability to block colon tumor initiation by azoxymethane and skin tumor promotion induced by phorbol ester TPA. Recently, curcumin has been considered by oncologists as a potential third-generation cancer chemopreventive agent, and clinical trials using it have been carried out in several laboratories. Curcumin possesses anti-inflammatory activity and is a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen-generating enzymes, such as lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase, xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Curcumin is also a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C and EGF-receptor tyrosine kinase. It is proposed that curcumin may suppress tumor promotion by blocking signal transduction pathways in the target cells.

Venkatesan N. Curcumin prevents adriamycin nephrotoxicity in rats. Br J Pharmacol 2000;129:231-4.
This study investigated the effect of curcumin on Adriamycin (ADR) nephrosis in rats. The results indicate that ADR-induced kidney injury was remarkably well prevented by treatment with curcumin. Treatment with curcumin markedly protected against ADR-induced proteinuria, albuminuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia. Curcumin restored renal function in ADR rats, as judged by the increase in GFR. The data also demonstrate that curcumin protects against ADR-induced renal injury by suppressing oxidative stress and increasing kidney glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity. This suggests that administration of curcumin is a promising approach in the treatment of nephrosis caused by ADR.

Kawamori T, et al. Chemopreventive effect of curcumin, a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, during the promotion/progression stages of colon cancer. Cancer Res 1999;59:597-601.
This study was designed to investigate the chemopreventive action of curcumin when administered (late in the premalignant stage) during the promotion/progression stage of colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats. The study also monitored the modulating effect of this agent on apoptosis in the tumors. The results showed that the administration of 0.2% curcumin during both the initiation and post initiation periods significantly inhibited colon tumorigenesis. In addition, administration of 0.2% and of 0.6% synthetic curcumin in the diet during the promotion/progression stage significantly suppressed the incidence and multiplicity of noninvasive adenocarcinomas and also strongly inhibited the multiplicity of invasive adenocarcinomas of the colon.

Mehta K, et al. Antiproliferative effect of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) against human breast tumor cell lines. Anticancer Drugs 1997;8:470-81.
The antiproliferative effects of curcumin against several breast tumor cell lines, including hormone-dependent, hormone-independent, and multidrug lines, were studied. Curcumin preferentially arrested cells in the G2/S phase of the cell cycle. Curcumin-induced cell death was due neither to apoptosis nor to a significant change in the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including Bcl-2 p53, cyclin B and transglutaminase.

Rao CV, et al. Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by dietary curcumin, a naturally occurring plant phenolic compound. Cancer Res 1995;55:259-66.
This study was designed to investigate the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis and the modulating effect of curcumin on the colonic mucosal and tumor phospholipase A2, phospholipase C gamma 1, lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenase activities in male F344 rats. The results indicate that the administration of curcumin significantly inhibited incidence of colon adenocarcinomas (p<0.004) and the multiplicity of invasive, non-invasive, and total adenocarcinomas. Curcumin also significantly suppressed the colon tumor volume by more than 57% compared to the control diet. Although the precise mechanism by which curcumin inhibits colon tumorigenesis remains to be elucidated, it is likely that the chemopreventive action, at least in part, may be related to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism.

References

1. Leung AY, et al. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics, 2nd ed. New York: Wiley; 1996.
2. Blumenthal, et al. Herbal Medicine, Expanded Commission E Monographs. Austin: American Botanical Council; 2000.
3. Somasundaram S, et al. Dietary curcumin inhibits chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in models of human breast cancer. Cancer Res 2002;62:3868-75.
4. Asai A, Miyazawa T. Occurrence of orally administered curcuminoid as glucuronide and glucuronide/sulfate conjugates in rat plasma. Life Sci 2000;67:2785-93.
5. Ravindranath V, Chandrasekhara N. Absorption and tissue distribution of curcumin in rats. Toxicology 1980;16:259-65.
6. McGuffin M, et al. American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook. Florida: CRC Press; 1997.
7. Brinker F. Herbal Contraindications and Drug Interactions, 2nd ed. Sandy (OR): Eclectic Medical Publications; 1998.
8. James J. Curcumin: clinical trial finds no antiviral effect. AIDS Treat News 1996;242:1.
9. Li JK, et al. Mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by curcumin. Proc Natl Sci Counc Repub China B 2001;25:59-66.
10. Venkatesan N. Curcumin prevents adriamycin nephrotoxicity in rats. Br J Pharmacol 2000;129:231-4.
11. Kawamori T, et al. Chemopreventive effect of curcumin, a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, during the promotion/progression stages of colon cancer. Cancer Res 1999;59:597-601.
12. Mehta K, et al. Antiproliferative effect of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) against human breast tumor cell lines. Anticancer Drugs 1997;8:470-81.
13. Rao CV, et al. Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by dietary curcumin, a naturally occurring plant phenolic compound. Cancer Res 1995;55:259-66.
14. Bundy R, et al. Turmeric extract may improve irritable bowel syndrome symptomology in otherwise healthy adults: a pilot study. J Altern Complement Med. 2004 Dec;10(6):1015-8.
15. Garcea G, et al. Consumption of the putative chemopreventive agent curcumin by cancer patients: assessment of curcumin levels in the colorectum and their pharmacodynamic consequences. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers aindications and Drug Interactions, 2nd ed. Sandy (OR): Eclectic Medical Publications; 1998.
8. James J. Curcumin: clinical trial finds no antiviral effect. AIDS Treat News 1996;242:1.
9. Li JK, et al. Mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by curcumin. Proc Natl Sci Counc Repub China B 2001;25:59-66.
10. Venkatesan N. Curcumin prevents adriamycin nephrotoxicity in rats. Br J Pharmacol 2000;129:231-4.
11. Kawamori T, et al. Chemopreventive effect of curcumin, a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, during the promotion/progression stages of colon cancer. Cancer Res 1999;59:597-601.
12. Mehta K, et al. Antiproliferative effect of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) against human breast tumor cell lines. Anticancer Drugs 1997;8:470-81.
13. Rao CV, et al. Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by dietary curcumin, a naturally occurring plant phenolic compound. Cancer Res 1995;55:259-66.
14. Bundy R, et al. Turmeric extract may improve irritable bowel syndrome symptomology in otherwise healthy adults: a pilot study. J Altern Complement Med. 2004 Dec;10(6):1015-8.
15. Garcea G, et al. Consumption of the putative chemopreventive agent curcumin by cancer patients: assessment of curcumin levels in the colorectum and their pharmacodynamic consequences. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers

jscho
Posts: 62
Joined: Jun 2009

Thanks for the response. I am quite familiar with the Sloan-Kettering site. Reference 6 (McGuffin M, et al. American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook. Florida: CRC Press; 1997.) suggests that curcumin is contraindicated in cases of blockage of bile ducts. I don't know what studies this handbook from 1997 references since I don't have access to the source. I have read many times on web sites selling herbal prodcuts that curcumin is contraindicated in the case of gall bladder disease or bile duct blockages, but they all seem to reference this handbook. I just don't believe it. My hepatologist has never mentioned the need to avoid curcumin even though we have discussed many supplements, including curcumin.

The PSC studies in mice and other studies on the protective effects of curcumin are very recent, but perhaps differ in that the whole point of the curcumin is to prevent the formation of strictures, blockages of bile ducts and other liver damage.

In any event, blockages in the bile ducts make you quite ill (jaundiced, feverish, itching, ....) so you would probably know about the blockage and would seek more dramatic treatment (stents, surgery, ...) than taking herbal supplements.

Best,
Jeremy

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

hi pepe and all,

As I mentioned earlier, I am waiting to finish folfox to start tumeric supplements.
Interest in the colon cancer prevention issue.

Note from anticancer is you need to have tumeric with pepper. just an fyi.

This paper indicates some forms of tumeric are more eaily absorbed.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19735646

Good luck to us all,

hugs,
Pete

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

But since I was operated from liver I do something very easy , every time I want to try something new , mainly herbs , I google in the Internet
searching contra indications, so if you type "turmeric contraindications " there are hundreds of references to don't have it if any problem with bile ducts.That's all the info I got!.
By the way . every time more and more is taking me lots of time to open our walking post ,it starts to be too heavy and I'm on an iPad ! does it happen to you as well? ( sorry Melissa for interfere your post)

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

hi pepe and all

if you are into liver, this will give yo a headache, i found it really interesting.

http://www.cmjournal.org/content/4/1/12

I am still researching this option, but its got all the buzz words. sorry buzz.

hugs,
Pete

ps yes walking is taking to long to load, I'll do it weekly like you do you yours.

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

Good will and love to all.

To all on FOLFOX and thinking about natural supports. Please read the paper below.
Should this be a separate post. I think so as its at a tangent to the original and is specifically focused on the tumeric and chemo folfox for most questions.

If this paper is scientifically valid I would ask the question why we are not advised about this natural support.

Based on this paper and the advice from Naturopaths research group I am taking tumeric on folfox.

The summary about the effectiveness of folfox to kill all the colorectal cancer cells I found a little depressing. Its exactly what I was told by TCM ONC.

The lack of effectiveness I had raised with ONC which she claimed was rubbish.

So below is a study that backs up TCM ONC view of folfox effectiveness. I am glad I have not put all my faith in folfox, when it appears to me that folfox needs help.

I feel extreme frustration when these types of research are advised and clearly discussed means we suffer while taking folfox and get only some of the benefit when it appears a more complete and effective response as at our finger tips. Its certainly a cost effective option. If you do tumeric with diet you need it with pepper according to anticancer. I do tumeric by supplement now. Just having my first.

Feel free to argue and debate this , I feel its worthy of a complete and frank discussion. Again my thanks to Blake whose initial warning about tumeric got me researching topic and to pepe for his copy and paste skills.

While the MD anderson tumeric advice is interesting but now I have more specific studies and advice from my naturopathic research team I will follow on the path of enhancing folfox effectiveness. I hope this is ok said one guineapig to the next!

My naturopath response is at the end.

hugs and love to all,

Pete

http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/30/2/319.full

Discussion
Chemotherapy produces incomplete responses in a vast majority of cancer cases particularly of colorectal cancer (2). This leads to survival of a population of cells within the tumor resulting in subsequent chemotherapy-resistant relapses. The precise mechanism of this phenomenon of chemo-survival remains unknown.
Abnormal activity of EGFRs has been associated with the development and progression of many malignancies, including that of the colon. In particular, overexpression of EGFR and HER2 in colorectal cancer correlates with an extremely poor clinical prognosis (20, 21). The majority of solid tumors, including those of the colon, overexpress one or more members of the EGFR family and coexpression of EGFR with HER-2 or HER-3 results in the development of enhanced drug resistance (9, 22). More recently, IGF-1R is also emerging as an important pathway responsible for the development and progression of colorectal cancer. In addition, there is crosstalk between EGFRs and IGF-1R, resulting in therapeutic resistance with targeting individual pathways (23). EGFR inhibitors have been successfully incorporated in the therapeutic armamentarium of colon cancer. However, the benefits appear to be modest and the complete responses are rare (24). One of the mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibitors is their hetrodimerization with IGF-1R receptor (25). Hence, co-targeting of EGFR and IGF-1R would likely result in greater therapeutic efficacy. In our model of chemo-surviving colon cancer cells, we show that not only EGFR and its family members, but also IGF-1R, are significantly activated, confirming their involvement in survival of these cells. Therefore, targeting them may provide beneficial effect in terms of reversing chemotherapy resistance. Recently a report by Dallas et al., who demonstrated inhibition of growth of oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells by inhibiting IGF-1R, further supports the contention that certain growth factor receptors play a critical role in cells surviving chemotherapy insult (11). However, one of the major concerns with combining various biological agents is an increase in overall toxicity. Hence, the development of pleiotropic agents with minimal toxicity is highly desirable in combating the emergence of chemo-surviving cells and the resultant subsequent relapse. Our current data demonstrate that one can target these survival pathways with non-toxic pleiotropic agents such as curcumin for therapeutic gains.

http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/55/2/259
Human epidemiological and laboratory animal model studies have suggested that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reduce the risk of development of colon cancer and that the inhibition of colon carcinogenesis is mediated through the alteration in cyclooxygenase metabolism of arachidonic acid. Curcumin, which is a naturally occurring compound, is present in turmeric, possesses both antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been tested for its chemopreventive properties in skin and forestomach carcinogenesis.

BELOW IS AN ANSWER FROM MY NATUROPATH RE TUMERIC AND FOLFOX CHEMO

> Animal studies indicate that curcumin may inhibit cyclophosphamide in
> treating breast cancer, but results from a phase I trial found a
> combination of curcumin and docetaxel to be safe. I didn't find any
> information that specifically pertains to using turmeric during
> chemotherapy for bowel cancer. The Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre
> recommend that more research is necessary and that it is advisable for
> cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy to limit intake of turmeric.
>
>
>
> The information that we have collated for our safety database has lead
> us at Metagenics to 'caution' the use of turmeric during chemotherapy.
> Whilst curcumin has been shown to enhance chemotherapy in ovarian
> cancer, it may suppress chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in breast
> cancer: curcumin was found to inhibit chemotherapeutic effects by
> reducing camptothecin-,
> mechlorethamine- or doxorubicin induced apoptosis in breast cancer
> cells, and reduce the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide in an in vivo
> mouse model. In contrast, curcumin has also been shown to augment the
> cytotoxic effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs, including
> doxorubicin, tamoxifen, cisplatin and camptothecin, doxorubicin,
> 5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, daunorubicin, vincristine, and melphalan,
> with no effect on the toxicity of etoposide, daunorubicin, and idarubicin.
>

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