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Loved one with bile duct cancer

shel497
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2009

My husband was diagnosed with bile duct cancer about a year and a half ago. It was resectable but has scans every 3 months to make sure it's not coming back. I live every day scared out of my mind. We have 2 young childern and I can't imagine it coming back. I am constantly watching everything he does and starring at him to see if I can see if there is anything different with him. Everyone tells me to relax but I just can't. I was just wondering how everyone else keeps their sanitity? Any suggestions with anyone else that is dealing with this type of cancer will be appreciated. I just can't imagine life without him. He just has another scan and we get the results back in 2 days. Praying everything comes back clean.

ketziah35
Posts: 1154
Joined: Jun 2010

I suggest that you post to the rare and other cancers board and the caregivers board. I think that you will find answrers there. I have seen posts regarding this cancer on one otlf the two of those boards.

HeartofSoul's picture
HeartofSoul
Posts: 732
Joined: Dec 2009

your best bet is to go to Liver cancer topic board here in CSN for other survivors.

see http://www.mayoclinic.org/bile-duct-cancer/ for more info

Diagnosis
Cancers of the biliary tract (gallbladder and bile ducts) seldom produce symptoms in the early stages. Patients who develop symptoms of biliary cancer, such as jaundice, will have a physical examination and one or more diagnostic tests. Read more about diagnosis of bile duct cancer.

Treatment Options
Treatments for bile duct cancer vary with the size of the tumor and how far it has advanced. Among treatments are surgery, liver transplantation, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, photodynamic therapy and biliary drainage. Where the cancer cannot be completely removed but has not spread outside the liver, liver transplantation may be an option. Mayo Clinic is one of the few institutions in the world offering transplantation for bile duct cancer. Read more about treatment for bile duct cancer.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/bile-duct-cancer/treatment.html

Bile duct cancer is a malignant growth in the ducts that carry bile from the liver to the small intestine. Cancer of the bile duct is rare and is most prevalent in people ages 50 to 70. Approximately 2,000 cases of bile duct cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year. The tumor sometimes blocks the bile ducts, which can cause jaundice, clay-colored stools, itching, loss of appetite, weight loss, fever, chills or abdominal and back pain. These tumors usually grow slowly and spread gradually. In many cases, bile duct cancer tumors are diagnosed in the advanced stages.

luz del lago's picture
luz del lago
Posts: 452
Joined: Jul 2010

My love had lung cancer, with mets to his liver. I believe that in the end, it was his liver that gave out. But what I really wanted to talk to you about was what you expressed about watching him. I, too, found myself watching my love for changes. I feel that I may have made him uncomfortable at times. So I began to try really hard just to look at him for the man he has always been for me. So many physical changes had occurred since his dx, that at times I had to take a second look. But when I really looked into his eyes, there he was! The man, that for almost 30 yrs. has been by my side, was looking back at me.

I know it is so hard. Thinking that perhaps if we see something and can do something as soon as possible, maybe that will be the difference. I eventually realized that "the difference" I could make was to just see him as I have always seen him. My love, my friend, the father of our children. I tried to remind myself that he did not wish to let cancer define him. Before cancer he was so much more than a survivor.

It is not easy, but try to embrace a calm that makes you what you have always been to him before all of this. My love said he wanted me to be more his wife and friend, than caregiver or medical attendant.

Sending good wishes your way,

Lucy

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