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Is Aspirin A cure for PC?

Trew
Posts: 892
Joined: Jan 2010

From Science Daily News a very interesting article on the use of aspirin for lowering recurrance of PC:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101025133750.htm

There is also a good article on the benefits of proton therapy:

http://procure.com/protontherapy/tumorstreated?gclid=CO_u99ql76QCFUIUKgodM0Mo1Q

bdhilton
Posts: 759
Joined: Jan 2010

Thanks Trew for sharing...Who knows but my Oncologist had it on the list of things he wanted me to do... I have posted these items a few times since Dec 09.... I guess it will not hurt...Peace

Trew
Posts: 892
Joined: Jan 2010

I miss a lot, but the aspirin is new to me. S0, back to taking the baby aspirin once a day.

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CharlieG
Posts: 67
Joined: Mar 2010

I had a cardiologist tell me once that if aspirin were invented today, it would be a HUGE headline! I've been taking a baby aspirin a day for years...

steckley
Posts: 100
Joined: Aug 2009

Trew, thanks for the post. Like some of the others who have posted, I've been on aspirin for quite a while. I'd been taking the aspirin for a number of years before my PCa was diagnosed. In my case the aspirin doesn't seem to have stoped the beginning of PCA; however, maybe it slowed the growth (?).

After reading the article I thought that those guys doing AS might want to consider taking aspirin if they are't taking it already.

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 669
Joined: Mar 2010

The article doesn't say how much aspirin the study participants took. Is it the same as recommended to avert heart disease (80-160 mg/daily) or some other quantity? Anyone know?

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Kongo
Posts: 1167
Joined: Mar 2010

Not sure that I would go along with the "aspirin is a cure" bandwagon just yet but there have been a number of studies that show a relationship between low-dose aspirin use and reduced risk of prostate cancer. The one below highlights a common thread in most of the reports I have read:

"Use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications in relation to prostate cancer risk - Abstract

Wednesday, 25 August 2010
Recent interest has focused on the role that inflammation may play in the development of prostate cancer and whether use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) affects risk.

In a population-based case-control study designed to investigate the relation between these medications and prostate cancer risk, detailed exposure data were analyzed from 1,001 cases diagnosed with prostate cancer between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2005, and 942 age-matched controls from King County, Washington. A significant 21% reduction in the risk of prostate cancer was observed among current users of aspirin compared with nonusers (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65, 0.96). Long-term use of aspirin (> 5 years: odds ratio = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.96) and daily use of low-dose aspirin (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.90) were also associated with decreased risk. There was no evidence that the association with aspirin use varied by disease aggressiveness, but there was effect modification (P(interaction) = 0.02) with a genetic variant in prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) (rs12042763). Prostate cancer risk was not related to use of either nonaspirin NSAIDs or acetaminophen. These results contribute further evidence that aspirin may have chemopreventive activity against prostate cancer and highlight the need for additional research."

I have also read studies that suggest tha aspirin is associated with reduced PSA but interestingly, not PSA velocity, causing some researchers to opine that perhaps we ought not to take aspirin for a few days before our PSA draw.

For several years the benefits of low dose aspirn from a cardiology aspecxt for men in their 50s and older has been fairly well documented. Having it also potentially be a guard against PCa seems to be icing on the cake.

Unless there was some other medical reason that overrode those advantages, why not take it?

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 669
Joined: Mar 2010

Thanks, Kongo, but I still don't see any mention of the exact dosage of aspirin used in the abstract you posted.

Have you seen a dosage number mentioned anywhere in the studies or abstracts for the use of aspirin for PCa that you've read or are we just to "assume" that they're talking about 81mg aspirin (1/4 of the normal aspirin tablet and the dosage normally used for the prevention of heart disease) when they say "low dose"?

FWIW, I take a lot of supplements already and, if Dr. Oz and other media docs are to be believed, there are many, many more that I should take as well.

I'm now using up a supply of saw palmetto, pomegranate and cranberry that I bought for frequent urination associated w/PCa (which I'll probably stop taking after the supply is exhausted) and I'm taking (and have been for several years) a multi-vitamin, calcium, glucosamine and fish oil pill daily for other things.

I'm not convinced that low dose aspirin is a wonder drug either, but my family has a history of cancer as well as heart disease. I haven't taken low dose aspirin for heart disease yet but may do so if there's also a possible side benefit to suppress the spread or growth of PCa following treatment.

It would just help to know if these PCa-aspirin studies are talking about 81mg or some other dosage of aspirin.

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Kongo
Posts: 1167
Joined: Mar 2010

Swing,

I was assuming that the "low dose" is the 81 mg tablet that they sell but I did see a study in the UK at about the same time that used a 75 mg dosage each day.

I looked into saw palmetto but decided not to do it as the reports I read at the time indicated that it took two or three years for it to have much effect, although others swear by it. I got the impression that it was masking the PSA rather than actually lowering it. I drink a lot of pomegranate juice but don't take the supplements. I've grown to like it. Cranberry juice is supposed to do a good job of neutralizing uric acid which causes the burning at urination.

Trew
Posts: 892
Joined: Jan 2010

Maybe I should, ah, start taking it now? LOL!

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 669
Joined: Mar 2010

If it can help prevent heart disease and maybe even help prevent the spread of PCa, why not? I just bought a bottle that'll last me a year and 1/2 and started taking 'em today.

hopeful and opt...
Posts: 1398
Joined: Apr 2009

I think there are coated and non coated aspirins; the coated is easier on the stomach.

steckley
Posts: 100
Joined: Aug 2009

Kongo,

A friend was diagnosed with PCa 20(?)years ago. He and his wife were ex-hippies, but were still into natural foods and cures big time (grew their own food, dried their fruit, etc.). He decided to take saw palmetto and other herbs. Lowered his PSA considerably (I am not sure if he had a biopsy ... at that time I was too ignorant of PCa to ask).

With time (5years?) the PSA began to increase and he was treated with brachy. He died of PCa about five years ago.

I am of the opinion that the saw palmetto (and other herbs masked his PSA), and that he might have been better off being treated when the PSA first increased. I know this is anecdotal ... but it did impact my decision making on what to do and when to do it.

I did try saw palmetto for about a year when I was diagnosed with an enlarged prostate. It didn't do much for me (I still had to get up at night), so I quite taking it ... maybe I should have taken it longer. I don't know if it had any impact on my PSA (my PSA was low at the time).

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Kongo
Posts: 1167
Joined: Mar 2010

Steckley,

From what I have read, saw palmetto is used commonly in Europe to treat BPH as it has been shown to reduce the size of the prostate similar to the commonly prescribed drug finasteride here in tghe United States. As I understand it, saw palmetto inhibits certain enzymes in the prostate that interact with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that enables interaction at the molecular level with prostate cell receptors, having an impact on the "true" PSA reading. In other words, the cancer is still there but the PSA shows a lower level than might otherwise be indicated.

I suppose this is most important for the early detection of prostate cancer where PSA screening gives us an early clue that the might be something abnormal going on. If our PSA was actually 6, for example, but long time use of saw palmetto showed that it was only a 3, then a man might not be advised to have a biopsy or other tests to determine the rise cause of the elevated PSA. Because of this I believe that saw palmetto only acts to lower the PSA reading, not reduce or reverse PCa.

While saw palmetto may be a less expensive way to reduce prostate volume in men who suffer from BPH, I would think it would be prudent to have a "baseline" PSA reading before taking it or finasteride, and that a man's doctor should be aware of the use of the drug as he made evaluations based on PSA readings.

I don't know the dosage levels of saw palmetto that should be administered to reduce BPH but I would encourage any man considering taking this herb to discuss it with his doctor first and weigh the pros and cons of using that, finasteride, or some other procedure to treat BPH but not reduce the ability to early detect PCa.

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 669
Joined: Mar 2010

I'm well aware of the PSA masking issue but once you know you have PCa, what does it matter?

I already knew I had PCa when I started taking saw palmetto (which made the masking effect irrelevant) and only started taking it after I already took 3 prescription drugs (Hytrin - huge headaches, Ditropan - no noticeable effect and Flowmax -- dried up ejaculate) which did not solve the problem which originally led to my PCa diagnosis -- namely, frequent urination at night.

I bought and started to use saw palmetto (standardized extract - 160mg) twice daily (morning and night) and it worked for me BEFORE treatment. Don't know if it reduced the size of my prostate which was slightly enlarged at 43ccs, but I stopped urinating as frequently as before AND it did not have any noticeable effect on my PSA. In fact, my PSA spiked frighteningly while I was taking saw palmetto, which my doctors attributed to the biopsy. My PSA level subsequently dropped (almost but not quite back to pre-biospy level before I was treated w/CK) but I don't know whether the drop was due to saw palmetto use or not but, based on my experience, my guess is not.

I've also been taking cranberry (standardized extract - 250mg) and pomegranate (standardized extract - 150mg)twice daily along w/saw palmetto for no good reason other than the fact that they are considered good anti-oxidants which are believed to also have cancer preventative benefits. Since I have already been treated, the only possible benefit to taking them for me is to reduce the potential spread of the cancer, which they also are believed to do. Their use is also associated with a drop in PSA.

After CK treatment, I am urinating more frequently than I had been before treatment, which was an anticipated result. My radiation oncologist suggested Flomax but I refuse to take it because of the way it dries up my ejaculate. I am still taking the supply of saw palmetto and cranberry/pomegranate extract that I have on hand and I don't plan to buy any more.

The saw palmetto doesn't seem to be working as well post-treatment as it did pre-treatment, but it's not a major problem. I also am not worried that the taking of these supplements may "mask" a recurrence of my PCa following treatment; if the treatment is working it should be readily apparent regardless of the effect of these supplements. My doctor knows that I'm taking these supplements and does not think otherwise because he (and other doctors) really don't believe that they have any significant medical benefit (or detriment, for that matter).

steckley
Posts: 100
Joined: Aug 2009

Kongo,

Thanks for a great explanation ... as usual, very interesting.

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