CSN Login
Members Online: 5

Ginger

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I had my first step with eating fresh ginger. Every morning I eat regular oatmeal with sprinkles of cinnamon and thought I'd try some shaved ginger....not too bad! I didn't cook it with oats, just put a few shaves on top after cooking and mixed with cinnamon. Didn't taste much ginger but when I did wow is it potent....take some getting used to.

What are some other ways you all are introducing ginger into your daily food? Also, how much of this should we be eating per day?

Happy eating...
Jan

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

I add my ginger to the green tee. It is so warming up in winter time.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Do you heat with the tea bags or add after cooled a bit? Just remember reading where it's best to not heat, so that's why I just add after oats are cooled and then gobble it down, so no heating with my method.

Just trying to understand the "tricks of the trade".

Thanks~
Jan

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

I simmer loose green tea leaves and 3/4 teaspoon (0.5 to 1.0 grams) of chopped ginger in 1 cup of hot water for five minutes in a closed teapot.I've heard that heating ginger, as occurs with cooking, might increase its pain-relieving effects.

Songflower's picture
Songflower
Posts: 632
Joined: Apr 2009

I don't know about how best to eat ginger or how much. But Claudia does! Ask her; she has turned herself into an expert. I'm one of those who try but still have weak knees for icecream and chocolate syrup.

Diane

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

"The ginger family includes not only the official ginger but also cardamom, tumeric, and zedoary. Various Zingiber species are used medicinally but do not equal ginger for benefits, including that of Turmeric, a close relative. In Asia, all members of this reedlike family are considered good for the health. The Arabs use two other members of the same family, galanga (Alpinia officinarum) and zedoary (Curcuma zedoaria) for treating stomach ailments and general weakness. The roots of these two plants are considered to be stimulants, aphrodisiacs, and, amazingly, a cure for amnesia. Pounded with olive oil, they are added to a hot bath or rubbed onto the body for any form of muscle complaints caused by overexertion. In North Africa, this usually comes from plowing; but, in the western world, it is likely to result from overexertion at the gym.
Ginger has a wide range of actions on the human body and has been found effective in the treatment of cataracts, heart disease, migraines, stroke, amenorrhea, angina, athlete's foot, bursitis, chronic fatigue, colds, flu, coughs, depression, dizziness, fever, infertility, erectile difficulties, kidney stones, Raynaud's disease, sciatica, tendinitis, and viral infections.

In China, the science of ginger is so exacting that ginger from different parts of the country are used for different purposes. Fresh ginger is used to cure coughs, nausea, gas, and dysentery, as well as treating fevers and mushroom poisoning. Dried ginger is used for all things that the fresh ginger is used for, as well as for hemorrhages, pervered lochia, constipation, and urinary difficulties. A natural diuretic, ginger stimulates the kidneys to flush out toxins faster. The fresh root is used mainly to promote sweating and to reduce fevers while warming and soothing the body during coughs, cold, flu, and other respiratory problems. It is also an expectorant for colds and chills.

In India, ginger is used to treat chronic rheumatism in this manner. The patient drinks an infusion of ginger before going to bed, and is then covered heavily with blankets to encourage copious perspiration. This same treatment is considered beneficial in cases of colds or catarrhal attacks and during the cold stage of intermittent fevers.

The essential oil has been used in both Eastern and Western medicine for at least 400 years. In France, it is still prescribed in drops on sugar lumps for flatulence, fevers, and to stimulate the appetite.

Ginger is an excellent remedy for all manner of digestive complaints, especially nausea, gas, and colic. In Mexico, ginger is considered to be more effective than Dramamine in combating motion sickness.

In Venezuela, ginger is pounded into a paste and applied to the abdomen for difficult menstruation. In Costa Rica, it is used in a decoction to relieve throat inflammations and asthma. With the addition of honey, it is a valued remedy for coughs and bronchitis, and also serves as a sudorific in fevers.

In Panama, it is said to relieve rheumatism. In Guatemala, ginger decoctions are taken as a stomachic and tonic. In Trinidad, it is a remedy for indigestion, stomachache, and malaria. Tthe fumes from an infusion in urine are inhaled to relieve head colds.

Its antiseptic qualities make it a highly beneficial remedy for intestinal infections, including some types of food poisoning.

Western herbalists regard it as a good circulatory stimulant, helping blood flow to the surface and making it a valuable remedy for chilblains and poor circulation to the extremeties. By improving circulation, ginger also helps high blood pressure.

Since it stimulates peripheral circulation, it is warming to the extremeties and helps prevent the kinds of chills associated with malaria, colds, and flus.

One of its more unusual uses is for burns. When used externally in a poultice or as an ointment, ginger soothes inflammation and promotes healing. The juice of fresh ginger, soaked into a cotton ball and applied to a burn, for example, acts as an immediate pain reliever (even on open blisters), reduces blistering and inflammation, and provides antibacterial protection against infection.

Some herbalists recommend mixing fresh ginger juice with a neutral oil and applying it to the scalp to control dandruff; and mixed with lemon juice, vinegar, and honey, ginger makes a soothing gargle for a sore throat.

Wild ginger is specific for painful cramping of the bowels and stomach.

To make homemade ginger ale: Take fresh ginger and flatten the unpeeled root. Place one cup of the flattened root in a gallon of water and bring to a rolling boil. Remove from the heat, strain, and add honey to taste. It can be drunk as is or added to carbonized water."

More about ginger and many other herbs on:

http://www.innvista.com/health/herbs/ginger.htm

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I know we've read many postings from Claudia on Ginger, and I've copied a few of her postings from last year. Think worth reposting since we're on this subject.

I'm eager to get into the ginger and happy to follow Claudia's suggestings, as she seems to carry quite a lot of weight on this site... I'll stick with as close to raw as I can get.

Jan

-------------------

November 3, 2009 - 9:20am
First the url:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/41747.php

The researcher on this is cathy's new doctor at the U of Michigan. Her specialty is ovarian cancer, we're so close, maybe she'll be the one to save us. Gotta love her. Dr. Liu. Here's her phone number if you want to schedule an appointment or offer to help: 734-647-8906. If that doesn't work, I probably transposed something. Sorry.

Good nibbling ladies.

It says you can email this to a friend or print it so I hope posting it here is alright otherwise, ah?? Other things if you decide to act on this info. Ginger is most effective if it is not cooked. I just buy raw ginger at the grocery store, there may be places you can get organic, but I haven't found them yet. I thinly slice the outer layer off, slice it about a 1/4 or an inch thick and take tiny little bites throughout the day. It is very spicy, but if it can help? Check with your doctor as, even though it says it is okay to use with chemo, you need to follow your doctor's advice. It might help them work better, so be sure to ask about your particular case. and if they haven't seen this information, you might give them a copy and Dr.Liu's phone number. Her paper is out there too, this is just a commentary on it.

Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that ginger not only kills cancer cells, it also prevents them from building up resistance to cancer treatment. Ginger is already used as an effective remedy for nausea and inflammation.

The scientists are presenting their results in a poster session at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

In this study, scientists applied a solution of ginger powder and water to ovarian cancer cells (similar ginger powder to what is sold at grocery stores, only a standardized research grade). In every single one of their tests they found that the cancer cells died as a result of being in contact with the ginger solution - they either committed suicide (apoptosis) or they digested/attacked themselves (autophagy).

If ginger can cause autophagy as well as apoptosis, it can prevent resistance to chemotherapy - something that is a common development with ovarian cancer patients.

Whether or not this brings the same encouraging results in animal studies remains to be seen, say the researchers.

Another great advantage of ginger is that there are hardly any reports of side effects. It is also an easy product to present in capsule form.

The researchers stressed that this is a preliminary study and further research is needed.

Over 20,000 American women are expected to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year. 15,000 women are expected to die from ovarian cancer this year (in the USA).

Click Here for more information on Ovarian Cancer.

This study was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health.

Written by: Christian Nordqvist
Editor: Medical News Today..."

Love and kisses,

Claudia

Couple of comments.
This is from 2006. she is three years further along now.
The pharmacuetical companies have enough faith in this research that they are trying to be the first to get a patent on the main cancer fighting ingredient in ginger, gingerol. My opinion, the whole is greater than the part. Eat the whole ginger first, you can supplement with the gingerol or dried ginger if you want.

Just remember, my only real experience is that I'm not dead yet. but that could change at any moment and I could be entirely wrong about a bunch of things because of lack of ALL THE NECESSSARY INFORMATION needed to be comletely right. this is just what makes sense to me.

‹ Thickning of endometrial wall Could it be cancer) Few things about Green Tea EGCG ›

--------------------------------------------------

california_artist
Posts: 554
Joined: Jan 2009
November 4, 2009 - 11:27am
Good morning, Jill
While it's true ginger tea is warm and yummy, it's the raw ginger, before you steep it in hot water that has the cancer killing punch. What if you cut off a 1/4" slice to eat, sans the thin skin, and make a cup of tea with another slice? Best of both worlds, eh?

My advice----take tine little nibbles of the raw ginger and let your stomach acids work their wonders at least an hour prior to the hot tea. Would be okay to have tea while nibbling if it was cool.

Love, like and you are poop-head,

claudia

Were you in New York for the poop-head era???hehehehehehehe?

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

Thank you for great info. I appreciate that you saved Claudia’s posts. She did impressive research on many interesting topics. I totally agree that raw form of any food is best for us. It is also good to have some variety in our diet. I love my ginger tea as comforting treat. From now on I will have a slice of fresh ginger with it as Claudia suggested.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Diane,

That is my favorite dessert. My nutritionist on first appt had me list what I eat, and the bad area is the sugary ice cream. She told me to go to 1 cup per day, but that's so tough for me. I just went cold turkey and switched to organic, sugar-free yogurt with fresh fruit and home-made granola on top. Really have gotten used to it and every once in a while go for my ice cream. Gotta enjoy life don't we?

As my grandma told me (lived to be 96 yrs)---- EVERTHING IN MODERATION!!!!!

Jan

maggie_wilson's picture
maggie_wilson
Posts: 616
Joined: Nov 2009

hi,

my very favorite dessert these days is fresh summer fruit: berries, apricots, peaches, plums, etc.-- you get the idea-- greek plain non fat yogurt (which is quite creamy) and little slices of raw ginger--but a lot of them. i tolerate raw ginger very well, the more the better, and just chomp away. it is so tasty. actually, i sometimes get herpes sores, and i noticed since i've been eating ginger and tumeric i've hardly had any, and one that got started, never got anywhere. i'm sure it's the anti-imflammatory properties at work! so, a little extra added attraction. plus, i do think the ginger, etc. is keeping cancer at bay, sure hope so.
sisterhood,
maggie

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I love idea of giner on top of yogurt, which I'll try tonite. Plus getting used to it in my oatmeal with cinnamon. If it keeps the cancer at bay it's amazing how many things we can down that we would have chocked on before cancer...hum!!

Cheers to enjoyment of fresh ginger....yummie!!!
Jan

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

thought this thread might help.

Best thoughts to you all,

claudia

I didn't read throught the whole post, but ginger is also very good at reducing inflammation.

HellieC
Posts: 425
Joined: Nov 2010

Hi Claudia
Thanks for bumping up the ginger post up the boards - and great to see you on here again - missed you and your thought provoking posts.
Kindest wishes
Helen

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network