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Read any good (cancer) books lately?

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

I recently read The Red Devil - To Hell With Cancer and Back - by Katherine Russell Rich. Although she had breast cancer, and her diagnosis was about 20 years ago, she has had numerous recurrances and still has a lot in common with all cancer patients. The name of the book, Red Devil, comes from one of her chemo drugs. It's Kool Aid red, and I see it often in the infusion room. In the breast cancer community, they call it "the red devil".

Katherine was very young when her cancer was first discovered (by her) and was dismissed by her doctor for a long time as "it's probably nothing". He even had the nerve to tell her, "Come by my office if you're really worried. I'll feel your breasts anytime you want me to." What a jerk!

Some of her chemo drugs were the same ones our doctors have pulled from their bag of tricks. And, of course, she experienced many of the same symptoms.

That she is still alive, still working, and still dealing with cancer is an amazing tribute to the power of strong-willed women everywhere.

Carlene

leesag's picture
leesag
Posts: 625
Joined: Jan 2010

Crazy, Sexy, Cancer Tips by Kris Carr

kathryn1's picture
kathryn1
Posts: 88
Joined: Jul 2009

I read "Cancer, Schmancer" by Fran Dresher. She had uterine cancer.

BonnieR's picture
BonnieR
Posts: 1549
Joined: Jan 2004

I have not read any cancer books lately but did read two of Mitch Albums books again, Have a little faith and One more Day, one based on a true story and one fictional but sure felt real. Love his books he also wrote Tuesday's with Mory and Five People you meet in heaven. :-)

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

I wonder if the red chemo referred to is Doxil. I am on Doxil now an it is a diluted red color.

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

It's Adriamycin, and it is bright red......looks like Cherry Kool Aid.

catcan
Posts: 122
Joined: Feb 2010

that thought just went through my head after having the Doxil yesterday

Kgirl
Posts: 45
Joined: Oct 2008

Doxil and adriomycin are in the same family of drugs. Both are cardiotoxic. Something to consider if using doxil after treatment for a previous breast cancer. My doctor is being very cautious in using doxil for this reason. I am taking a reduced dose and she is taking extra care to make sure I do not develop congestive heart failure. I have enough to deal with without adding it to the list!

Kathy

Barbara53's picture
Barbara53
Posts: 659
Joined: Aug 2009

When God and Cancer Meet, by Lynn Eib

kayandok
Posts: 1223
Joined: Jun 2008

I was very inspired by It's NOT About The Bike by Lance Armstrong. There are a lot of bike stories, but it talks about his fight with cancer.

I also read Anticancer, A New Way of Life by David Servan-Schreiber. It is written by a doctor who gets brain cancer. He has many interesting ideas, and although I didn't agree with everything, was encouraging overall.

I also have Kris Carr's Crazy Sexy Cancer and have read a lot of it. I love the sense of humor she has!

I also read same kind of different as me. It is not mainly a book about cancer, but I found the timing to be good for me in processing a lot of feelings relating to cancer.

kathleen

Mawty's picture
Mawty
Posts: 137
Joined: Sep 2009

Kathleen, I've read The Same Kind of Different as Me. I believe it's my favorite book ever. I've read Fran Drescher's book, Cancer Schmancer (not great), and Gilda Radnor's It's Always Something. I've read that about 5 times. She went through so much I've gone through. It amazes me that I'm using the same kinds of drugs they used on her 30 years ago. You'd think something better would come along.

I'd also like to ask a question. Because I have to have chemo every week, I've had to quit work. I know this sounds crazy, but I miss work so much. I feel useless. I spend more time with my grandkids, but they're all in school, and I don't get to see them all that much because they have so many after-school things. I try to get to their games. I've joined a woman's Bible study that I like very much. And a book club. But I just don't know how to fill my days. Anyone else have this feeling? All my friends work and my husband travels a lot. Just get lonely.

And Kathleen, your new picture is just beautiful. You look so healthy and vibrant! Is this a new one? Wow.

I've been lurking somewhat lately, but don't spend nearly as much time on the computer. I'm doing a lot more reading.

Marty

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

Mawty,
Good to see you. I figured you were busy. I am glad you are doing well and feeling well.

I can't really help with how to fill the time thing. I definately do not have that problem with two young kids. Now that they are back in school I do have more time to clean, organize and of course think too much. Since they started school I've been in an emotional slump. BUT, being the person that I am, I do have projects lined up. I have lots of closets, cabinets and containers I want to organize (fun, fun). I also want to get back to working on photo books for the kids, video messages and journaling. I want to do some more yard work for the fall. I wish I had the time to sit and read.

Have you thought of volunteering? Maybe making scrapbooks and journals for the grandkids? Writing letters to those that you love?

I wish you continued health!!!

leesag's picture
leesag
Posts: 625
Joined: Jan 2010

Marty,

I understand how you feel, I felt the same way during my treatments, but I knew I would be going back to work. If I have a recurrence, I'm not sure what I'll do. Disability retirement is an option, and, if I have to go that route, I may volunteer at the library to do a story time for kids. It's something I think I'm pretty good at, and I'd still get to do something I love. Anything would be better than laying on the sofa, which is all I was able to do with recovering from surgery and then chemo on top of it. Some type of part time work is also an option, I guess.

LPack's picture
LPack
Posts: 658
Joined: Oct 2008

"Hear My Cry" by Tish Hagee Tucker

My sister in law sent me this book. She had a rare form of cancer with two toddler girls.

Good book.

Libby ♥

BonnieR's picture
BonnieR
Posts: 1549
Joined: Jan 2004

this book was given to me by a friend because I always said I am in win win situation. :-)

BetsyD
Posts: 5
Joined: Feb 2010

This book is about a study done comparing diet to cancer growth, among other things. After reading it, my husband and I are changing our eating habits to eliminate animal protein. Yes, we are becoming vegetarians and I can tell you it is a lot of work. But after reading the findings of these studies, I'm convinced that it is worth the effort. Wish us luck.

msfanciful
Posts: 580
Joined: Nov 2009

Another good book you may want to check out is a book given to me by my oncologists' physician assistant.

The book is called "Crazy Sexy Cancer Tips" by Kris Carr.

This book is excellent reading because Kris in a manner so refreshingly beautiful has written this book in a way that you want to find what's next in her journey.

But my point is, she too addresses the point of animal proteins being acidic and inflammatory to the body and she stresses veggies, veggies, veggies!!!

Nevertheless it's good reading, informative and full of stories from others with cancers and how they too made the choice to make the best of their life with cancer.

Good Luck.

Sharon

Margaret Caroli...
Posts: 17
Joined: Jan 2010

Another good book is "The Light Within" by Lois M. Ramondetta,M.D. & Deborah Rose Sills. Dr. Ramondetta is at M.D. Anderson Hospital & Deborah Sills an ovarian cancer patient at M.D.Anderson Hospital. How they met & the friendship that formed during treatment. Haven't seen anything from you for awhile. Hope you are doing well. MC

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

I've read "Gilda's Disease" by Dr. Steven Piver and Gene Wilder a number of times since I was diagnosed. I think it has some of the best explanations of staging and treatments that I've seen, basic and not too complicated. It's getting a little dated now, but I still keep a copy to refer to, and have a copy to lend. I think one thing that bugged me is that when I first read it (probably 2003), I was having the same chemo protocol that was described as "the gold standard" - carboplatin and taxol. The book was published in 1996. I think this is why we need more research done on this disease-I don't know how long carboplatin and taxol have been being used, and I suppose they're the best available for now, but it would be refreshing to see a real breakthrough for NEW treatments!

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

My oncologist told me at my initial visit that not much has really changed in the past decade. I found that shocking. But yes, we are recv'ng the same treatments that were given years ago. There was one significant study done in Japan that came out in Jan. 10. It was a phase 3 clinical trial with a dose dense taxol given weekly...I think it was Taxol. I can find the link if you are interested. I thought I'd ask my oncologist about it if my current regimen of Doxil doesn't work or stops working.

leesag's picture
leesag
Posts: 625
Joined: Jan 2010

"I'd rather do Chemo than clean out the garage"

A Humorous Take on a serious subject, and a gift from a dear friend.

janetr12
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2010

"What Faith and Love Can Do", by Dan Cole. Husband and wife going through cancer treatment at the same time, supporting each other.

naomilansing's picture
naomilansing
Posts: 11
Joined: Jun 2009

read some of 'crazy, sexy cancer tips' but had to return it to the library! it's been checked out for a long time, which makes me both sad and less lonely feeling.
also, 'everything changes: the insider's guide to cancer in your 20s and 30s.' helped so so much! tons of great resources inside, too. comforting and useful? yes please.

vj1's picture
vj1
Posts: 151
Joined: Jun 2010

Suzanne Somers--knock out---don't bother found it to be more upsetting than good
will try crazy, sexy cancer---seems you girls have enjoyed that one!

Lisa 00
Posts: 109
Joined: Jul 2009

Kris Carr, the creative woman who is behind the book also did a documentary. I was lucky enough to stumble upon it on TV a year or so ago. Although I can't find it on Tivo, I do see that Netflix has it. I highly recommend it. Very informative, motivating and entertaining.

leesag's picture
leesag
Posts: 625
Joined: Jan 2010

One of the few cancer books I enjoyed. I highly recommend it for women of all ages.

Sometimes I feel kind of stuck in the crack of cancer resources though. I'm not in the young demographic (20's and 30's) nor am I in the senior demographic. It seems like if you're in your 40's you're not expected to get cancer! lol

HeartofSoul's picture
HeartofSoul
Posts: 732
Joined: Dec 2009

Doxorubicin; trade name Adriamycin

Recently, Adriamycin has come under fire because studies show it can have a toxic effect on the heart muscle, leading to heart failure.

For this reason, patients being treated with Adriamycin often have a MUGA scan to make sure the heart is working properly. Doxorubicin's most serious adverse effect is life-threatening heart damage.

It is the devil, hair loss, short term memory loss, nausea, loss of appetite, stomach pains, loss of sleep, sweats, mouth sores, watery eyes, neuropathy, and on and on.....nasty, nasty stuff.

Acute adverse effects of doxorubicin can include nausea, vomiting, and heart arrhythmias. It can also cause neutropenia (a decrease in white blood cells), as well as complete alopecia (hair loss).

When the cumulative dose of doxorubicin reaches 550 mg/m², the risks of developing cardiac side effects, including congestive heart failure, dilated cardiomyopathy, and death, dramatically increase.

Due to these side effects and its red color, doxorubicin has earned the nickname "red devil"

Chemotherapy can cause reactivation of hepatitis B, and doxorubicin-containing regimens are no exception.

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

This book was in the "Great Reads" column in People magazine.

"Ovarian cancer stalks her family, but this college professor and mom of two has refused to live in fear. Her journey inspires."

I plan to get a copy to read.

benpeacock
Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 2013

Lessons from my Left Testcile by me : )   A bit of humour to cure a tumour   http://www.my-left-testicle.com

ellenm1
Posts: 2
Joined: Jan 2013

I've read a lot of cancer books, but my favorite is Memoir of a Debulked Woman by Susan Gubar. It's not humorous or sexy or religious. It's brutally frank. She also writes a blog or column for the New York Times about her ovarian cancer.

annecris's picture
annecris
Posts: 44
Joined: Jan 2011

My favorite is: "Dying to be Me - My journey from cancer to near death to true healing"  By Anita Moorjani - a true inspiration

 

2timothy1 7's picture
2timothy1 7
Posts: 337
Joined: Jan 2012

I am currently reading"When God doesn't make sense." Written by James Dobson

Dmk.c3
Posts: 5
Joined: Feb 2013

Hi, I'm reading Gubar's Memoir now. Definitely frank... not a bedtime read... but good stuff; makes a lot of great points, raises many good questions. Looking forward to checking out some of the lighter reads people have suggested. Good reads and good luck to all!

TracieK's picture
TracieK
Posts: 45
Joined: Sep 2008

Hi!

I remember you so well. I have not been on this board for a while and I should have been. You came on this board not long after I did! After a support system to me on this board passed, I had to get off temporarily. That does not mean I stopped thinking of you. I read another post and it sounds like you have been on a rollercoaster recently. I want you to know the prayers for my teal warrior sisters have never stopped!

Hugs to You,

TracieK

 

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