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The Omentum

msfanciful
Posts: 580
Joined: Nov 2009

Hello everyone,

I've been looking for the answer to this question for a long time now.

I've waited to see if Dr. Oz would discuss it; I've searched the internet for this answer as well. I'm hoping now that some of you will have the answer to this question as I cannot for the life of me find it.

Okay, I know that the omentum is very important in that it's key role is to harbor fat onto it, ultimately resulting in a beer-belly effect. Also it is this fat (on the omentum) that eventually encroaches into the major organs; i.e., liver, kidneys,etc causing a host of other health concerns.

Now, if the omentum is meant to be there and perform this way, how is it affecting those of us who have had it removed (as I have and I imagine many of you). Does this mean we will be less apt to gain fat in the abdomen or does it mean that fat is now running rampant within our abdomen now that we have no omentum for it to grab onto and wreak havoc on our organs?

I'm asking because I'm trying to live a healthier lifestyle (through better diet plan and eventually exercise). I'd just like to know how not having the omentum will affect the body overall. Will it have an adverse effect? If so and anyone knows, how so?

If anyone has the answer, I'd greatly appreciate it.

Thank you,

Sharon

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

I do know that some doctors who perform the gastric band procedure for obesity (Lap Band) remove the omentum at the time of surgery. The thinking is that it will increase the potential for future weight loss.

saundra's picture
saundra
Posts: 1390
Joined: Mar 2007

I was sure flat stomached for about 9 months. Now have a roll below the breast 3-4 inches thick and am sure it is fat! My oncologist does not want me to lose weight in order to have a reserve for the future. It was nice for awhile though. I have gained about 25-30 lbs since the surgery. Saundra

valentina
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2001

hey Sharon...

I am also trying to research affects of omentum removal due to cancer surgery and the link with abdominal fat. I have recently gained about 15 pounds and my waist is expanding rapidly. I am reading Dr Oz's book...alot of talk about this omentum....but what if you don't have one....I hope one of us can get an answer...wishing us both luck and good health

Valentina

msfanciful
Posts: 580
Joined: Nov 2009

Hi Valentina,

I am so glad to hear that I am not the only one desperately seeking the answer to this question.

Unfortunately, as much as I hear about the omentum; I still have not located any source that can answer specifically..."what happens to our bodies once the omentum has been removed?"

Not even Dr. Oz has given an answer to this (sigh).

I've also read Dr. Ozs' book as well. This might sound silly, but I thought not having a omentum might be a plus, out of this whole cancer experience seeing how the omentum is a key organ in drawing/holding fat? So silly me thought just maybe... without one, one would be less apt to gain fat. But of course I don't think it quite works that way.

Once I ever find the answer, I will most certainly post it.

Sharon

kayandok
Posts: 1223
Joined: Jun 2008

and do let us know if you find out anything. I was an all time high, right before dx. My weight has been down, up and down and now creeping up again. Mine seems to be affected by the type of chemo I'm on.

Love the new profile pic, BTW!

Kathleen:)

josie2012
Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 2012

Hello everyone,

I have a few questions for clarification. I am newly diagnosed with stage3 ovarian cancer with a thick, cakey omentum. I am in the pre-op stage before my complete hysterectomy and waiting for final test results. I'd appreciate any and all feedback:

1. One connecting thread I am seeing is weight gain after the omentumectomy. Of those who have experienced weight gain, how many of you had chemo/radiation coupled with steroids or chemo/radiation alone?

2. Of those of you who have experienced weight gain, how many of you are practicing a strict vegan lifestyle (no animal products of any kind, low sodium, no refined sugar or processed oils and eating only whole, unprocessed foods, whole grains, organic fruits & veggies and nuts/seeds as healthy fats) coupled with moderate exercise?

I know my questions seem extreme, but I think chemo is more extreme and I am looking for answers.

Thanks in advance for your honest input!

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

I know this is an old topic but I'll add my 2cents. I've gained weight since my surgery too.

msfanciful
Posts: 580
Joined: Nov 2009

Hi,

During the past 2 years my weight ballooned 60lbs over my ideal weight.

Why just after the holidays; I found myself devouring a 3layer chocolate cake (leftovers from Christmas) aptly named..."Death by Chocolate." LOL!

After just getting this mental picture of myself... I thought OMG, what must I look like right about now? The very next day I went into survival mode and am slowly becoming a vegan.
I lost 20lbs in the 1st month (January) and 10lbs in this month. My oncologist is astounded...and this is really silly rather than giving myself the credit of being disciplined enough to drop the pounds, still in the back of my mind I asked my dr., it isn't the cancer is it?

Of course she laughed, the cancer hadn't quite gotten a hold of me at this point yet.

But I truly think not having the omentum has a lot to do with our weight gain as well. I'll keep looking though.

Sharon

softD's picture
softD
Posts: 71
Joined: Dec 2008

I had my omentum removed as well (June 08) and I too have gained weight since then.
Once I had recovered from the sickness of chemo, the weight started to creep up, now having gained a total of 15kg in 18mths!!! :O

Carolyn xx

Tina Brown's picture
Tina Brown
Posts: 1054
Joined: Nov 2009

I too have gained weight. However I still have my omentum as my cancer cells are thinly spread all over it so surgery was not an option. I have been told that the steriods that I am on (to counter act the side effects of the chemo) gives you an appetite so you eat more. It also helps you to put on weight. I am upset because I lost 2 stone 2 years ago and felt great - bought new clothes. Now none on my clothes fit and I feel uncomfortable.
xxx

pixelprincess
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 2010

I just found out that my Stage 4 Endometrial cancer (diagnosed originally August 2007), has now spread to the Omentum, and I am glad I stumbled onto this site and saw your threads back and forth.

My new Oncologist tells me that they can give me radiation for the small tumor that is in the pelvic region, but not in the Omentum area because it would cause too much internal damage to the organs around it. I am terrified to have any radiation. Nobody in my chemo group or others that I run into who are semi-OK about talking about their cancer (stage and treatments, and recurrences), but NOBODY will talk about their radiation experience. This has me really worried.

My mom even said Dr. Oz (whom I am SOOOOO glad is now doing his own shows), talks about the Omentum a lot. But, he does not get too in depth with a lot of topics, so I am not surprised he is not going into major details for people like us who have cancer there and what the ramifications are for not having it.

Have any of you that had it removed, were you able to have it done laparascopically or did you need major abdominal incisions? My doc did not get into detail on this yet. I am afraid of getting more infections if I needed to be opened up like I did with my vertical 12-inch hysterectomy incision (got MRSA two times - once while under chemo and it took 3 months of IV antibiotic treatment - it was a nightmare).

Anything I can learn now before I reach the end of my 6-cycles of chemo will be very helpful.

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

Mine was removed at the time of my de-bulking surgery. I had extreme "caking" of the omentum, which means cancer seedings all over it.

Carlene

azgrandma's picture
azgrandma
Posts: 576
Joined: Feb 2010

They took most of mine also. when they drained the fluid from my stomach, all of my organs stuck together making it nearly impossible to do a complete historectomy, so someday i need to go back and get utures, and cervis taken out. they took what they could of the omentium as it also was attached to other organs, but chemo killed the cells that was left there
i have had the opposite, i can not seem to gain weight

Sister M
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2010

My 80+ year old mother had hers removed during her surgery for uterine cancer. From everything we have read, this is part of the most aggressive treatment, which is what she asked for. A couple of years after her chemo and radiation treatments finished, she is doing great. No recurrence to date. Her OB-Onco watches her like a hawk. If there is a recurrence, she is ready to go through chemo and radiation again.

support1group
Posts: 1
Joined: Feb 2012

Hello,

I hope your mom is better now.

My mom is almost the Same Age as yours.Please can you answer a few questions?

First, what are the surgery survival chances?
Was chemotherapy started immediately after surgery?
How many cycles did she have to go through?
When was radiation started?
How often and how many did she get?
Does age play a negative role?

Please advise about anything that we should ask or be ready for before the terrifying steps start.
Will really appreciate any answers that you can provide.
Thanks
Very Worried

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

You've posted in a really old thread, Support 1. You might have a better chance of getting more/better responses if you start a new thread (subject).

All the best to your mom. I'm quite a bit younger, so probably not a good comparison, but my recovery was long (almost 3 weeks in the hospital), but I had a lot of complications, too. The doctor started my chemo about 4 weeks post-surgery. I had 6 cycles of Carboplatin/Taxol, then a year of Taxol only (once a month). No radiation for me. I think general health is more important than age, in terms of recovery, as well as her Stage and grade of cancer.

Carlene

kathryn1's picture
kathryn1
Posts: 88
Joined: Jul 2009

I found this on the wise geek website. I couldn't find anything that said there was any known side effects. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-an-omentectomy.htm

rubyslippers
Posts: 53
Joined: Jul 2010

Hi all ,

Im getting a bit confused regarding the omentum, my mum has been told they cant operate or remove anything because the tumour is too big and she has it spread over her omentum. They said they do not remove her omentum because it keeps her bowels in place. Any input would be greatly appreciated many thanks Kris xx

Karen9182
Posts: 62
Joined: May 2010

Hi--
I had my omentum removed during my debulking surgery ( along with ovaries, tubes, uterus, cervix) inn apr of '10. My surgeon referred to it as my "fatty apron" . I thought "Hey! Maybe I'll start a fad...I know all my girlfriends would love to lose something called a "fatty apron"!!" I have never heard anything either way--leave it in or take it out. I have several unfounded thoughts and ideas, but none bases in fact. I'm curious now...
Best to all-- Karen

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

"Call it what you like: Beer belly, protruding gut, spare tire or other creative names. What you're referring to is the visible consequence of the omentum.

Often described as a "fatty apron," the omentum is a sheet of fatty tissue that hangs down in front of the intestines, providing a protective cushion.

Of course, many people have more protection than they need or is healthy for them. The omentum, technically the "greater omentum," is one of the main fat-storage depots in the body. It thickens with accumulating fat, expanding the skin into that well-known shape.

The omentum hangs down, like an apron, from the bottom of the stomach. Its lower edge descends to near the pelvis. It's folded, and the other point of attachment is to the transverse colon, just below the stomach. It varies greatly in thickness, depending on how much fat is stored there.

But the omentum isn't just a passive recipient of fat, a sometimes wayward padding. It's also packed with nutrients and growth-stimulating chemicals, along with stem cells, the "ancestral" cells that turn into various body tissues and organs.

The omentum has germ-fighting cells that migrate to infections in the abdomen. The omentum actually adheres to places of infection, helping to seal them off. For this role, the omentum has been dubbed "the policeman of the abdomen."

The omentum is a handy tool for surgeons, who use it as a kind of biological duct tape. Sections of omentum are grafted onto cut areas or lesions to help them heal. It's been used on the gastrointestinal tract, heart, spinal cord and brain.

The omentum can be also a source of problems. When its blood supply is interrupted, symptoms such as severe pain and tenderness can mimic appendicitis. And of course, an omentum enlarged with fat makes people look unsightly.

One might think it would be easy to get rid of that beer belly by removing the omentum, such as through liposuction. But that would be dangerous. Since the omentum is closely connected to the large intestines, its removal could cause damage. There is also a risk of peritonitis, an infection of the inner abdomen that is extremely serious and can be fatal.

If there's some excess omentum you'd rather not have, the old stand-bys of exercise and diet are the safest way to go. Your omentum will give up the fat naturally and that beer belly will -- with enough effort -- flatten out."

msfanciful
Posts: 580
Joined: Nov 2009

Wow,

Hi Bea-Mil,

I've been away for a minute and just saw your very very thorough explanation of the role the omentum plays.

Thank you soooo much... I must say you covered so many unanswered questions for me, so I have a much better idea now about the omentum.

Where did you find this info, from your doctor, internet? I've looked everywhere and couldn't find anything, so I am really impressed.

Thank you again.

Gratefully,\

Sharon

akm52's picture
akm52
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2010

I am glad to know I am not alone in this search for omentum info. Let me add this: I had a total hysterectomy,including removal of the omentum, Stage IVB endometrial cancer, followed by radiation and chemo. This is what my oncologist told me: the cancer had spread to omentum but in a way I was lucky. Unlike other 'organs' the cancer in the omentum does not spread from there. It acts like a dam, trapping the cancer in there. So although technically I am stage IVB because it spread outside the pelvis, he considers me IIIC, because it spread to the omentum where it stops. Also in lymph nodes, but that's another story.

Good luck to everyone on this site. Quite a trip this cancer, right?!
Amy

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

Amy, I too was diagnosed as an atypical stage IV. I wonder if really makes a big difference anyhow. After struggling with my recurrence I now believe it is all depends on how well your cancer responds to the chemo. We ovarian women don't usually get radiation though.

akm52's picture
akm52
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2010

I think you are right, Nancy, about the staging not making a big difference. I focused on it for a while until a resident in the hospital told me, the survival rates are really for the doctors. 'For you,' he said,'it's either 0 or 100% survival and right now you are at 100.' That made more sense to me. I'm sorry you have had to deal with recurrence. You decided to go with another round of chemo? Has it helped?

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

I have been fighting this recurrence since January. I will always fight as I have two young children at home. PET/CT next week to see how effective my latest chemo is. Since I just had a jump in my ca125 I am expecting to get less then terrific results. If you click on a persons name/picture you can read their history...if they choose to write one.

akm52's picture
akm52
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2010

I pray you get results that are better than you expect. Two small kids. My heart is with you, Nancy. Thank you for the info on reading a person's history. This network thing is new to me. Wishing you the very best.
Amy

LPack's picture
LPack
Posts: 658
Joined: Oct 2008

Nancy,

I am with you on this fight. I have been fighting my recurrence since last July. Even though my youngest of four is 29, I will always fight, too. We have 4 young grandchildren and 1 on the way - more reason to fight. AND our two youngest sons are not married - more reason to fight. And I don't know yet where all of my children are with the Lord - EVEN more reason to fight.

Warriors we are!!

motherhenaz
Posts: 2
Joined: Aug 2010

hi amy, this internet thing is new to me also. i was just told i have a large mass coming off my right ovary and goes all the way over my omentum with some possible stranding in the omentum. all my other organs look normal and my blood was normal. i was glad to read that yours stayed in the omentum. what type of treatment did you need

p80007
Posts: 2
Joined: Aug 2010

I had my omentum removed in'05 as a result of colon cancer. I don't know anyone else without an omentum. It's nice to see some info about it. I too have gained much weight over the past 5 years. I also had a baby 2 years ago. I had to have surgery after her birth to fix my previous cancer surgery. I was not aloud to pick her up or carry her for 3 months. But with 20 volunteers we got thru it. It seems I was told I could not get pregnant after my chemo, and when I found out I was pregnant they said she wouldnt survive. But she is 2 and beautiful and healthy. I also have a 9 year old. Oh the possibilities after cancer! Have a great day! Take care all,shannon

newhopechurchli's picture
newhopechurchli
Posts: 127
Joined: Oct 2008

I had some spots of microscopic cancer on my omentum - so the doctor removed it along with a few other things LOL!!! But we don't really need it so it is definitely better to remove it then to leave it there for potential problems later on.

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

I saw a Dr. Oz show in which he actually showed a real omentum and talked about it-unfortunately, I didn't retain much of the information! I wonder if his website would contain what was discussed. If I had something faster than dial-up, I'd investigate!

aykt36
Posts: 28
Joined: Jun 2010

thanks

naomilansing's picture
naomilansing
Posts: 11
Joined: Jun 2009

what an amazing thing to think about! i had my omentum removed during surgery (for ovca) about 18 months ago and have hardly even thought about it. i have had some weight gain, too, and while it's probably because of my fondness for chocolate, it sure would be interesting to know if weight gain is normal after an omentectomy. i never would have thought to make the connection though. so you're brilliant.
one thing i was worried about was maybe getting my innards hurt! like in a fall or a crash or ... say... kickboxing? the way my surgeon described it was like it was a bit of a cushion. does anyone know anything about maybe being more at risk for injury or damage to organs because of the loss of omentum?
i'd really like to take karate someday! haha

Mawty's picture
Mawty
Posts: 137
Joined: Sep 2009

I have found it very hard to lose weight. I gained about 11 pounds and then went up to 20 pounds. I now have lost all but the 11 again. But I have mesentery thickening in my upper abdomen, so that's something I can't get rid of. It mainly happens as metastic cancer, but my oncologist said for me not to worry about it. I still do worry about it.

I think it's the first time in my later adult life that a doctor has said not to lose weight just like someone else said on here. But I remember when I was first diagnosed, I thought, and I know this is just crazy, that I will finally lose weight. Doesn't it seem like that's at least one of the bonuses we could have? :-) It seems to be a slap in the face that we gain instead of lose. I think it's the steroids I take weekly and I don't get around as much. I walked 4 miles this week, maybe more. I've tried to stay out of bed even though I want to just lie down and sleep, sleep, sleep.

Marty

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

I know what you mean, Marty. I lost a ton of weight right after surgery. I had an Ileus and then started vomiting uncontrollably, plus my appetite just disappeared for weeks. They finally resorted to feeding me something thru my port that looked suspiciously like liquid Crisco. I was into some really tiny jeans around Christmas and I thought...wow, that's the up-side to Cancer, right? It didn't last though.

I'm on steroids for something that might be chemo related Gout, plus the ones I get pre-treatment every month. They are wicked. I'm like a hyperactive pre-schooler on them, can't sleep, and eat everything in sight.

How are you doing otherwise?

Carlene

newhopechurchli's picture
newhopechurchli
Posts: 127
Joined: Oct 2008

I can't believe I just read what you wrote.... I was coming on here to ask a question about the puffiness I have in my upper stomach... right under the breast. It is sticking out so far - I was worried. Apparently you have the same thing??? Is this a result of a missing omentum?

Tina Brown's picture
Tina Brown
Posts: 1054
Joined: Nov 2009

I can really identify with what you are saying Marty about weight gain. I have battled all my adult life with my weight and finally the year before I was diagnosed I got down to my ideal weight & was so happy. I too thought I would lose weight during my treatment but instead I gained about 28 pounds (all I had lost and more!!) I am/was a runner so this weight gain has spoiled my hobby. It is the combination of steroids and inactivity + eating what you fancy when you are feeling ill that did it.

I was told not to worry about it but I do, I don't like it and coupled with my hair loss gives me a low self image of myself. But hey - I'm alive :) I am trying to exercise, a bit of running, a bit of swimming but like you all I really want to do is lie down and sleep.

Tina x

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

Yes to the weight gain! I do eat more and exercise less. I never really had to worry about weight as I was always relatively thin. My pants definately DO NOT fit me anymore. I lived in dresses all summer as they were so comfortable. Most of the time I say the heck with it but I really do HATE not fitting into my jeans. I am abouit 15LBS over my presickness weight.

Mawty's picture
Mawty
Posts: 137
Joined: Sep 2009

At least we're not alone in this weight business. I still say we deserve one good thing, and that would be to lose weight. I say that facitiously, kinda.

New Hope, my doctor said the mesentery thickening is actually usually metastisis of the disease, but I've already had the thickening and it's just growing. She said the growth wasn't to be worried about at this point. Mine is across my whole upper abdomen. I don't know if it has anything to do with the loss of the omentum. I'll have to ask her when I see her next.

Thanks for your comments back to me. I'm feeling fine and doing quite well right now.

Blessings,

Marty

kayandok
Posts: 1223
Joined: Jun 2008

I have the weight gain and puffiness. I thought it was from being opened up so many times, but not having the omentum for the fat to cling to makes more sense. I am lop sided, and the fat on the belly is not evenly distributed. Since my doxil blisters have healed, and it has finally cooled down in Japan, I am out walking again. So, I hope to loose some of this extra weight.

I did loose 30 pounds while on the cisplatin/gemzar, but i was so weak, and although it was nice to be downa couple sizes, I didn't like all the weakness that went along with that.

k♡

PS Marty so glad to see you post and hear you doing well!!!!

msfanciful
Posts: 580
Joined: Nov 2009

Hello,

Newhopechurchli,

About the thickening across the abdomen; I've developed a surgically related hernia
that is more fatty tissue.

It has the ugliest looking bulge slightly on my left side of the upper abdomen.

Just another possibility is all I'm saying. Does it hurt? My hernia doesn't hurt and I'm not quite sure if I even want to go to any type of surgery to repair it after what I've been through. :-)

Sharon

newhopechurchli's picture
newhopechurchli
Posts: 127
Joined: Oct 2008

Hi. No it doesn't hurt.... It just sticks out so far and I look like I'm pregnant when I'm dressed. I was told last year that I had a small umbilical hernia that really I didn't really need to have surgery because It was very small. I wonder.... maybe it got larger and is showing there in my upper stomach!?!?!? I will definitely ask my doctor to look at it.... Thank you :)

josie2012
Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 2012

Hello everyone,

I have a few questions for clarification. I am newly diagnosed with stage3 ovarian cancer with a thick, cakey omentum. I am in the pre-op stage before my complete hysterectomy and waiting for final test results. I'd appreciate any and all feedback:

1. One connecting thread I am seeing is weight gain after the omentumectomy. Of those who have experienced weight gain, how many of you had chemo/radiation coupled with steroids or chemo/radiation alone?

2. Of those of you who have experienced weight gain, how many of you are practicing a strict vegan lifestyle (no animal products of any kind, low sodium, no refined sugar or processed oils and eating only whole, unprocessed foods, whole grains, organic fruits & veggies and nuts/seeds as healthy fats) coupled with moderate exercise?

I know my questions seem extreme, but I think chemo is more extreme and I am looking for answers.

Thanks in advance for your honest input!

Joanchase
Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Msfanciful,
I(love the name and your personality). You have managed to work your way into my heart over the past hour and all who have responded are pretty special too! I have been reading with interest all testimonies and kudos to all of you for your upbeat attitudes.

I, too, had my omentum partially removed and was comforted by the reports everyone has sent in until you mentioned hernia. PLEASE before you consider surgery in this regard, read my story. I am not saying don't have surgery but I am saying question the mesh that is being used if any. Also, go to your computers and look up Mesh Lawsuits in Canada and the U.S.

The surgery I currently require is abdominaplasty to correct multiple hernias on the abdominal wall caused by rejection of the Marlex mesh used in a prior surgery. On January 26,2011 I had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, washings and lymph node sampling for Endometrial cancer. On February 3rd, 2011 my sutures all opened and I was operated on for wound dehiscence and Marlex Mesh was used to close the abdomen. A Vac sponge was then placed to assist closure of this abdominal wound as closure was not complete due to low blood pressure. On February 7th, 2011 surgery was performed to remove Necrotizing Fasciitis of the left side of the abdominal wound. On April 13th, 2011 debridement with split thickness skin graft from left thigh to abdominal wall was performed. I was in the hospital for a total time of six weeks.

My body is now rejecting the mesh and the Cat Scan is showing images of concern as it is appearing to be entangled in the organs. My abdominal wall is so weakened, and there are now several hernias and I am awaiting surgery once I have lost the weight that all of you seem to be experiencing as well.

My reason for writing this is to encourage all of you with hernias to get all of the info you can in this regard and judge for yourselves whether hernia surgery is necessary. The godsend in all of this is my intelligent husband who insisted on being given all written reports, ie. surgeries, cat scan results, consultations, etc. which are exact replicas as to what is placed in your file. They have to give you these upon request as it is the law that they do. This is how we found out about the mesh.

Joan

josie2012
Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 2012

Hello everyone,

I have a few questions for clarification. I am newly diagnosed with stage3 ovarian cancer with a thick, cakey omentum. I am in the pre-op stage before my complete hysterectomy and waiting for final test results. I'd appreciate any and all feedback:

1. One connecting thread I am seeing is weight gain after the omentumectomy. Of those who have experienced weight gain, how many of you had chemo/radiation coupled with steroids or chemo/radiation alone?

2. Of those of you who have experienced weight gain, how many of you are practicing a strict vegan lifestyle (no animal products of any kind, low sodium, no refined sugar or processed oils and eating only whole, unprocessed foods, whole grains, organic fruits & veggies and nuts/seeds as healthy fats) coupled with moderate exercise?

I know my questions seem extreme, but I think chemo is more extreme and I am looking for answers.

Thanks in advance for your honest input!

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 997
Joined: Nov 2009

Hi Josie:

After I had my hysterectomy, they found the cancer in my uterus and left ovary so when they went back in for staging they did remove my omentum and appendix.(nothing else found) My diagnosis was endometrial adenocarcinoma. I had chemo (carbo/gemzar) and I did gain about 30+ pounds. I had 3 brachytherapies 6 months later. That was back in 2005 and I could not lose the weight. I only lost a few pounds here and there. I was watching my diet, but that was about it. I also ended up with a hugh venial?? hernia.

In 2010 I had another surgery which removed a small mass and after that they repaired my hernia. I started to really use fruits, fiber, etc. since August of this year. I have lost over 30 pounds and weigh less now than when I had my first surgery. The biggest factor that I gave up was artificial sweeteners of any kind and diet soda. (just once in awhile). I drink black tea or green tea and I still put honey in it, and still was able to lose weight. I did however give up the sweets except only on specific holidays and only on that day. If I am somewhere where there is cake, I take a very small slice and eat a little bit. (instead of a 2x2 piece, I just slice it for a taste.

I also started to eat greek yogurt (never thought I would like that), switched from regular pototoes to New Jersey Sweet Pototoes, couscous, etc. I still haven't gotten into the exercise part of it. I do walk occassionally, bowl, do the Wii. For snacks I eat an apple and piece of cheese (need carb and protein together).

Hope my information is of help to you.

My best to you.

Kathy

Ianjames
Posts: 1
Joined: Jun 2012

Hi everyone, this is my first post, thanks for sharing your experiences...my wife is about to undergo major surgery for recurrent cervical/ovarian cancer to remove Omentum and surrounding tissues, hopefully they won't find it spread elsewhere, the surgery is also somewhat exploratory....this is to be followed by iv Chemo, and chemo "belly wash" where they pump the chemo directly into the abdomen....we are struggling with that this is the right decision at this time...any insight is greatly appreciated...much love to you all, Ian

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

Ian,
You say this is recurrant ovarian cancer. Did your wife have surgery the first time? What stage was she? Typically, during debulking surgery, performed on ovarian cancer patients, the omentum is removed. Hopefully her surgery will be performed by a gynecological oncologist. Her surgeon needs to have this level of expertise for an effective surgery. If her surgery is optimal (meaning that no tumors larger than 1 cm remain after the surgery), then it is common for the patient to receive both interperitoneal and IV chemo.

ftreloar
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2012

I have had stomach pain (only when pressed on)for 2 weeks & went to E.R. CT scan showed a large cloudy area in the momentum. My surgeon is performing a laproscopy to do a biopsy. I am really scared, what could this be. Always have yearly gynological appts & there has not been any problems. Any ideas?

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