CSN Login
Members Online: 11

IP Port Problems

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

I have almost completed my 4th (out of 6) chemo treatments. Last Tuesday was an IP cisplatin day that did not go well. The chemo nurses had a difficult time placing the needle in my IP port, and I ended up with a total of 5 painful punctures, and had chemo leak out after I got home. I wonder if anyone else has had this trouble. My first 3 treatments went well, but I did have pain from the needle insertion a couple of times. A numbing compound is applied, but I really feel the needle going into my side-the most I can liken it to is when I had a needle biopsy of a breast.

Today I will call the doctor who is ordering the chemo to discuss it with him, but I wonder if any of the women on this board have any suggestions or insight into the problem. I think the port may have tipped or has gotten out of place, but don't know enough about it to speak authoritively about this. Has anyone else had this sort of problem? If you did, was there a solution? I really would like to complete the whole chemo course, and haven't had any real problems outside of this!

Sue

nancy591's picture
nancy591
Posts: 1059
Joined: Sep 2009

I didn't have any problems with my IP port. I had 3 rounds of cisplatin IP. I found it VERY painful too. Is the numbing ointment applied at least one hour prior to the insertion? I found the numbing ointment to be very helpful. Is your IP port placed against your lower rib? I certainly never had chemo leak out.
Good Luck
Nancy

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

Hi Nancy,

Yes, the numbing cream has been used, but doesn't seem to make much of a difference when the needle goes so deep. The port is not against my rib. I had some chemo leak after my second cisplatin treatment; the other two did not result in leakage.

I spoke with the doctor's office today, and they're going to arrange availability of the nurse whom I have the most confidence in for tomorrow.

I'm all for people getting on the job training, but I'd feel a lot better if the nurses acted with confidence when they're approaching me as a patient, so I'm going to pursue this a little farther to see if the center can go about instilling surety in their nurses.

Sue

Mawty's picture
Mawty
Posts: 137
Joined: Sep 2009

I had a problem with my port. It WAS put in on an angle so the nurses sometimes had trouble getting the needly to go in. It clogged all the way once, so they used "drano" and got it cleared. But one time fluid started coming out. I didn't realize it until it was all over my clothes and I stuck my fingers in it. I said what's this, and all the nurses came running. They said don't touch your face or anything! Well, it turned out it wasn't the chemo, just some fluid (probably what they had put in first to flush). It only happened that once, but the nurses were really concerned.

Marty

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

Hi Marty,

I've had a number of the nurses comment on how well my IP port was placed, so I don't know why it's been such a bugaboo.

When I left the center after the cisplatin treatment, I had a big patch with gauze under it, and didn't realize how soaked it was until later in the evening. I washed everything down as I'd been cautioned if any of it leaked, but I ended up with an irritated patch just the size of the gauze's cover. I don't know what the toxicity of the stuff is outside of the body, but I will ask the pharmacist tomorrow. I've been plying him with questions about drugs when I see him in the treatment room, and he's been very helpful.

Sue

MK_4Dani
Posts: 318
Joined: Sep 2009

I have not had leaking problems with my IP port or pain during access. I put the numbing cream (lidocaine and prilocaine cream, 2.5%/2.5%)1.5 to 2 hours before treatment and cover with press and seal. My port is located on my lower right rib cage. I did have a "new" nurse just pull the needle out quickly and it bleed and hurt BAD! I have had 5 IP treatments, (Carboplatin) with the last one this Thursday. Perhaps the difference is the drug? I do know the nurses with IP experience do make a difference.

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

I thought I'd let you all know that my discussion with the nurse at the office paid off. I had two experienced nurses today, and although the port is tipped a bit and it took two attempts to insert the needle, it was not painful, and was probably my best experience yet. When I'd spoken to the nurse at the doctor's office, I wasn't critical-just stated my fears and why I had them, so I was pleased to have a positive experience today!

BonnieR's picture
BonnieR
Posts: 1549
Joined: Jan 2004

Hi Sue, glad to read the positive outcome of this. I am just amazed how your body is holding up and wanting to continue with the IP, seems most women stop after a couple treatments. What a warrior you are, an amazing role model for us. Sending lots of Hugs ♥ Prayers Bonnie

groundeffect
Posts: 651
Joined: Mar 2003

Hi Bonnie,

I've been considering this experience, and hope that I'll be able to advise the center about how they might want to approach changing a few things with this IV/IP protocol. One thing I know for sure is that if Ativan is on the orders-it should be one of the first things to be administered...

With all of the time I'm spending waiting for my chemo to get into my system, I do a lot of thinking (and sleeping, and reading, watching t.v.)...

I did find out that the biggest concern for leaking chemo is for others (children in particular) who may come in contact with the fluid, so common sense in that regard is in order. The rash I developed can be covered with OTC hydrocortisone cream to help the itching.

One of my main concerns right now is that I may have alienated the wonderful nurses who were carrying out their jobs when I had the day of many punctures. I really didn't relish calling to talk about the problems that had occured, but it did seem necessary after having so many of them involved. It did improve my situation, but now I feel as though I may have hurt feelings. I do plan to talk with the social worker there so I can express my concerns about this. She seems to be well-liked, and I know her from our contacts for our OVCA support group. I'd really like to smooth things for women who elect to have their chemo here after surgery for OVCA!

Sue

BonnieR's picture
BonnieR
Posts: 1549
Joined: Jan 2004

Dear Sue, I am positive you did the right thing. I have had to this twice in the seven years of chemo and hospital stays. One was a nurse who was trained for desensitized chemo but sure seemed to have some memory or thought process issues and go to find out I was not the first patient to say something about her. But taken more serious as I have been around for a long time. The other was in the transplant ward and go to find I had mostly floats and they changed things for the next ovarian patient. So you make a difference and that is good, when something doesnt' feel right we need to follow our gut and brain to change it so it doesn't happen to anyone else. Hugs Bonnie

Hissy_Fitz's picture
Hissy_Fitz
Posts: 1869
Joined: Sep 2009

My infusions take a long time - like 7-8 hours - because they have to be done slowly. Just before Christmas I drew the only male nurse on staff. He was new - came with the new doctor, her "personal" nurse and he worked one day a week in the infusion center. Lucky me.

After the hands on the clock passed 5:30, and we were the only ones left in the building, the nurse stopped my Saline drip and was giving me straight Taxol. Then, after a few minutes, but with about 25% of the drug remaining in the bag, he suddenly said, "You're good to go," and he withdrew the needle and tossed the bag and the remaining Taxol in the trashcan. Since none of the other nurses had ever cut my treatment short, even when they had to stay past 6PM, I questioned this. He gave me a silly song and dance about how the meds "sink" to the bottom of the bag and all I was really getting at that point was Saline.

I pondered and worried over this for DAYS. Finally, I spoke to my doctor's nurse and later, made sure my doctor was aware of it. He said, very curtly, "It's been addressed". I have one treatment since then, on a Monday, and he was not there. I told my doctor I did not want to make a scene, but I would not allow that man to touch me again. I know he's bound to be pretty unhappy that I went over his head, and I am not comfortable being "stuck" by someone who has a grudge against me.

While I was at the hospital for a blood transfusion (I know the transfusion nurse in "real life"), I told her about the experience and she confided that they (the hospital) had had problems with him, too. He consistently refused to follow established hospital protocol, which tells me a lot about him, professionally.

You did the right thing to bring this up, and so did I. We have to be our own biggest, loudest advocates.

stonepepper
Posts: 2
Joined: May 2010

I have not had a problem with nurses yet, or anything like that. But my husbands chemo-port did not work the first time and he had to have surgery agian. then I thought he was getting reddness under his gauze, so I took him in and his port was leaking, they removed it and all. but it made his skin blister. We go into the Treatment center tomorrow, it was going to be removed tomorrow anyway. I did not relly think they would leak. And your right, to worry about how bad the stuff really is. Sorry to hear about that horrible Nurse, I hope they figure it out and transfer him.

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network