CSN Login
Members Online: 16

how many have port in?

lindadanis
Posts: 267
Joined: Nov 2009

I am thinking of asking my husband's doctor tomorrow if we can get a surg. consult to put in a port., I think this would be much easier for him for chemo, fluids, etc., instead of getting stuck all the time., how many patients actually get this port and are they easier? I am talking about the port that goes into the chest cavity.

RevLee
Posts: 50
Joined: Jul 2009

My husband had a port put in and he thanks God he did. He said it made getting blood work done, his chemo, any IV's for fluids, etc so much easier since it was all done through his port. Like William said, he drove over to Fox Chase Cancer Center, had it put in, and drove home! He tells all patients starting out with chemo to get one. Saved him from getting stuck all the time and he said it was not painful having it put in.

Lee

Betty in Vegas's picture
Betty in Vegas
Posts: 311
Joined: Jul 2009

Basically same thing, only less invasive. You do need to do care on the picc lines though. I flushed it each day, and changed the dressings twice a week. Not hard at all. It did make it easier for him not to be stuck all the time.

Betty

JaneE2366's picture
JaneE2366
Posts: 332
Joined: Jul 2009

I agree....go with a port. My husband has a power port (Bard) and it makes things so much easier. It is used even if they only have to draw blood. He has had no problems with it...just need to make sure it is flushed on a regular basis...which has not become a problem for us since he is still in treatment.
Stay Strong,
Jane

K_ann1015's picture
K_ann1015
Posts: 555
Joined: Aug 2009

My dad never had one...but it hasn't been a problem. But the chemo can be tough on the veins, so it may necessary for some.
Good luck with appointment!
Kim

mumphy's picture
mumphy
Posts: 486
Joined: Jun 2009

Al had the port put in during his staging. We love it. Less needle sticks, easy to get to and not hard to keep clean. Most times when they go to stick him I have to remind him that they can just use the port.

For chemo it is so much easier for on the patients veins.

God Bless,
Kath

emg09
Posts: 252
Joined: Mar 2009

My dad has a port also. He's had to have his replaced due to it getting into a loop somehow. The port is great. They do all his blood work from there. It doesn't seem to bother him at all. They do give him a numbing cream to use before going in for his apt. Hope this helps!!
Erika

LindsayBrown
Posts: 23
Joined: Dec 2009

My dad has the port as well. Tge port has been great for him. No problems with it so far.

Lindsay

Hope_Faith
Posts: 164
Joined: Aug 2009

My hubby has a port. Wonderful for chemo treatments. However, no other places will use it for blood tests etc... Also, he just had surgery yesterday, and they would not use it. They made a different access. They had such a hard time getting an I.V. in - I wished that they could have just used a port.
~Shelly

dwhite0002
Posts: 130
Joined: Jan 2010

Hi,

I had a port put in immediately in 2006 before I began chmo. I still have it, and it is convenient for blood work and most other things. For example, I still get dilated every couple of months. They use the port for my sedation meds.

My oncologist's philosophy has been to keep it unless it shows any signs of being problematic. I have had it three years, now.

Good luck,

David
Hillsboro, OH

survivorfam
Posts: 43
Joined: Jan 2010

My husband had a port put in during staging. It was such a help during chemo. They didn't use it for anything during his surgery but I know he wished they would have because it was much less painful for him.

Jane

emg09
Posts: 252
Joined: Mar 2009

my dad has a port. They can have problems with the port also. He's had to have it replaced because it got twisted. I'm thinking it got twisted because he was out t******** branches above his head, so doing that squeezing motion is what I think did it. Then the 2nd one went bad on him. Hopefully you won't have to deal with that, but just in case, know that it can happen and they can replace it.

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network