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Thank You All

howdybooth
Posts: 44
Joined: Aug 2009

I have to tell you what a fantastic site this is for anyone looking for answers or just comfort! My sister’s stage 1b uterine cancer was treated with only surgery, but spread to the vaginal cuff within 90 days. She received radiation treatment and just went for a follow up PET scan and they have now found a small lesion on the surface of her liver. Surgery and chemo look to be in her future……visit to the surgeon scheduled for Tuesday (12/15). I went to the liver discussion board and it’s not a very happy site at all…….more doom and gloom then “keep fighting the good fight”. So thank you all, you very dear woman, for having the courage to share, but the strength to fight.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

This cancer thing is a real mystery to me. I'm glad that you find this site supportive - we are a bunch of great gals here.

I wish all good things for you, your sister and all your loved ones. Mary Ann

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

You know, I was just thinking about this. How does anyone know if cancer is a new cancer or a recurrance. For the women who had tamoxifen for breast CA and now have uterine CA - is this a new cancer (uterine) or recurrence of the original breast CA?

And for many of us with NO PRIOR SYMPTOMS, I wonder if we don't have many cancers "brewing' inside and one just pops up first and gets diagnosed. In my case, apparently "a cyst broke" and sent me to the ER with severe pain and they found the uterine cancer. Well, as I write this I am realizing that with all the tests they did, they would have found others too (dah).

Anyway, my original question still holds. Mary Ann

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

How are? you've seemed less and less happ recently.

As to the question, all cell have their own look. In the cancer arena, a well differentiated endometrial cancer cell, still looks like an endometrial cell, just with a nasty nucleus. It still maintains the look of the cell. In our type of cancer, the cells are growing so rapidly that while one can tell they are endometrial, they have divided before becoming more mature and are thus referred not referred to well differentiated, but just plain sucky. Where ever these cancer cells show up they still look like endometrial tissue. The reason they were thought to be ovarian in nature until the mid eighties was that they divided so early on that people could tell that they were endo and not ovarian, just that they were of a serous nature. My dad who had cancer all over his body, but mostly in the liver, did not have liver cancer. He cancer of an undifferentiated source. I never knew what that meant til I got this cancer. ours is generally a failure of the p53 gene, which in normal cells, is the gene responsible for apoptosis, cell death, not the murder that chemo does, but natural cell death is which is way better for you as a person.

Love,

and hope this clears it up some,

Claudia

Please try to cheer up, you're killin' me.

Songflower's picture
Songflower
Posts: 632
Joined: Apr 2009

My cancer of the uterous is endometroid and serous. it is not breast cancer. If I have a Metastasis it could be my old breast or this new cancer. Most likely it would be serous as it is so agressive. The type of breast cancer I had was not as agressive. Her 2 neg. But now this serous is something else. I am puzzled by the way it seems to spread like lightening speed. We certainly need more research. We all have a few cancer cells, our immune systems ususally gobble them up. And I don't believe the gobblygood that you got cancer from not living a good life, etc.

It's a tough one to live with. I had a great week where I left it someshere but then the shadows came back for a few days.

Diane

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

Apparently all we have to do is figure some way to turn the p53 gene back on and we're good to go.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

Mol Cancer. 2009 Nov 16;8:103.

Elevated expression of p53 gain-of-function mutation R175H in endometrial cancer cells can increase the invasive phenotypes by activation of the EGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway.
Dong P, Xu Z, Jia N, Li D, Feng Y.

Hospital and Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai, PR China. dongpeix@yahoo.co.jp

BACKGROUND: p53 is the most commonly mutated tumor suppressor gene in human cancers. In addition to the loss of tumor suppression function and exertion of dominant-negative effects over the remaining wild-type protein, several p53 mutants can gain novel oncogenic functions (gain-of-function, GOF) that actively regulate cancer development and progression. In human endometrial cancer, p53 mutation is more often associated with aggressive nonendometrioid cancer. However, it was unknown if p53 mutants contributed to endometrial cancer progression through the GOF properties. METHODS: To clarify the relationship between expression of p53 GOF mutation (p53-R175H) and invasive potential of human endometrial cancer KLE cells, we tested the consequences of up-regulation and down-regulation of p53-R175H in KLE cells by inducing p53-R175H expression vector or suppressing the p53 gene with short hairpin RNA. RESULTS: We found that forced over-expression of p53-R175H significantly promoted cell migration and invasion, and induced activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Conversely, suppression of p53-R175H with short hairpin RNA significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion, and resulted in attenuation of EGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway. CONCLUSION: These findings show for the first time that elevated expression of p53-R175H mutant may exert gain-of-function activity to activate the EGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway and thus may contribute to the invasive phenotype in endometrial cancer.

Hope you can still find your thinking cap.

Love you, as soon as I can get a car that goes fast, I'll visit or we can go on a road trip. I think road trips cures anything that ails ya. Something about the open road makes me so happy and feeling alive and free.

Love,

Your friend in hope,

Claudia

p.s. did you play the hamster dance yet?

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

And so? You were p53 postitive??Did you also have the Ki67 test? Her-2 pr,er.
Was your cancer similar to mine with the mixed histology and large polyp based. Do you know in the literature in regards to upsc that due to it's metastasizing even though only 10% of a polyp, that they no longer say confinded to a polyp. That changed with last years NCCN Guidelines. Had mine tested and it was positive for p53 and that k one. I would have to get out my labs to see what exactly it was called.

I live in the unstaged limbo land of one whose lymph nodes were never evaluated or removed. Never had any formal treatment. But, I am ever optomistic as to being cancer free someday soon.

Love you and what are you doing in that photo???

Would you resend the photo of your dog. I accidentally deleted it along with a bunch of other ones. I have over 900 and something emails and perodically loose my mind. My thubm is acting very strangely today and my typing and speeling are suffering greatly.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Jill, Remember recently the concern about naming threads carefully? Well look at where we have gone from a simple thank you!!!

Life just takes it's twists and turns - we just are all here for the ride. And these unexpected things (at least most of the time) can be alot of fun.

Claudia, you and Linda are picking up some vibe from me, but I'm really doing well. Just my little brain takes its own road trips sometimes. I have alot going on with work and my crazy undecorated house, and all the concerts our chorus is doing around the holidays. It's stress but mostly good stress.

Thanks for all your concern and caring. It means alot. Love all you ladies. Mary Ann

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