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RED SPOT ON VAGINAL CUFF......YEEKS OR NOTHING-internal radiation..no pain..no problem

maryln3
Posts: 65
Joined: Jul 2009

WENT FOR FIRST INTERNAL RADIATION

PROCEDURE WAS PAINLESS BUT STARTED OUT GETTING A BIOSY..BACAUSE RADIOLOGIST SAW A RED SPOT ON THE CUFF....

THEY R HOPING THAT IT IS GRANUAL TISSUE-SCAR TISSUE....AT LEAST THEY DID THE RAdiation....

it was not so bad..a pelvic exam..follow by catscan...lie flat on gurney completely covered and warm the doc inserts the tube which was painless and they 20 minutes of treatment
and done

if u know what the red spot is about tell me other wise i will tell u next week...

maryellen
stage 1-c endomertiral cancer
hyster..and lymph nodes 27 removed all clear
3 internal radiation treatment - needed
had a agressive tumor with lymphvascular invasion

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1356
Joined: Jan 2009

I had robotic surgery in January 09. I had an area that did not heal properly that they saw when I had the pelvic exams after the surgery. At first the surgeon said it was not healing properly,he recommended pelvic rest. Then as time went on he said it was like "over healing". It was granular tissue. It was still that way when I started my radiation therapy in April. Both the gyn onocologist and the radiation onocologist said it was okay to proceed with the radiation therapy. I had the 28 external radiation treatments and the one internal radiation treatment (which was 28 hours long). It will be interesting to see what my next pelvic exam shows.

maryln3
Posts: 65
Joined: Jul 2009

thank you...now i am not so worried....

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1356
Joined: Jan 2009

I never had pain before surgery or after surgery. My main problem was bloating after surgery. With the robotic surgery they inflate your abdomen with a gas. My surgery was 6 hours long, so that would be a lot of gas used. It took weeks for the gas to go away. Luckily I was able to walk right away and every day I increased my walking. That did help get rid of the bloating. I have been very fortunate to not have had any pain. Even when I had that abscess I had some tenderness, but not pain.

The less pain is one of the advantages of having robotic surgery. Patricia, you had the open hysterectomy didn't you. Hope your pain gets better. In peace and caring. HUGS to you.

kansasgal's picture
kansasgal
Posts: 115
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi, Patricia!

I still have pain just to the right of my navel - about the size of a large golf ball or a nice juicy plum. I notice the pain when I bend forward, when I roll over in bed, and each time I get into or out of the car. There are probably other times as well, but these occur every day. I tell my gyn-onc about it at each visit, the day before each round of chemo. I saw him this afternoon. He tells me each time it is from adhesions. If it still hurts now, he suspects the pain will remain with me the rest of my life unless I elect at some point in the future to have another surgery to try to eliminate the adhesions. Of course repairing some could cause others to form. The pain has stayed the same for the past 2 months. The rest of the pain from my surgery is gone. I had an open-abdominal hysterectomy with the ensuing very long scar.

Good luck in deciding what to do. I hate making decisions like that! Of course I keep thinking that even though I felt absolutely no pain BEFORE my cancer diagnosis and while the cancer was actually INSIDE my body, now that (hopefully) all the cancer has been removed from my body, every pain I experience is an indication of metastasis!

Sally

lindaprocopio's picture
lindaprocopio
Posts: 2022
Joined: Oct 2008

I was feeling really fabulous when I first finished treatment (last brachy July 1) and went to the beach 2 weeks later and walked for miles each day and felt good.

Now, almost 3 months out of treatment and 6 months since last CHEMO, I find myself with worrysome little pains that bother me for a couple of days, and then go away, to be replaced by a new twinge-y pain elsewhere. (Last week I had a dull pain in my right pelvic area. gone now but replaced by a pain in my right groin area, also gone now. ????) At night sometimes my legs feel like lead from the knees down, if I have been shopping with a girlfriend or worked more than 2 hours in the garden or if I've worn any kind of tight constricting jeans all day. Seems like my bowels are never 100% normal lately, nothing really awful but not like they were pre-treatment.

I think I'm just so 'tuned in' to my body now, listening for a hint that something needs addressed. I remember similar 'traveling pains' throughout my chemo, never hurting enough to call a doctor and never lasting long enough to be really scary.

Maybe we are all still just healing. We put our bodies through so much. And I personally am pushing my body each day, trying to regain optimal health and strength so that IF the 'beast' returns, I will be in the best shape I can be to fight the battle anew. I try to do 2 hours of physical activity or heavy labor each day (mostly enlarging my already-enormous garden beds by digging and digging and moving plants around).

Still, I relate all too well to your concerns and worries about these pains, even though I too never had cancer-related pain before diagnosis, so why I think that pain could be an indicator that the cancer is back, I don't know!! "Illogical", as Spock would say.

I refuse to live in fear!! I bought 3 pairs of really good support socks ($50 for 3 pairs!) for my trip to Greece, hoping that will take care of the 'lead legs' feeling, as I really haven't had too much ankle swelling lately, just this heavy feeling, and I know we'll hike for miles. I stopped wearing skinny jeans and am back to wearing sweat pants to cut down on the constriction, and I continue to dig in the garden every day. And I believe this 'twinge-y' stage of healing will pass eventually. For all of us.

Be fearless, ladies!! Live with joy!!

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