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Endometrial Cancer Research

lindaprocopio's picture
lindaprocopio
Posts: 2022
Joined: Oct 2008

I won't pretend to completely understand this, but I came across this new research on UPSC on the Cancer Society Institute and wanted to share it, especially the hormone therapy for California_Artist:

Tumor Suppressor Genes. National cancer Institute is also supporting efforts to isolate a novel tumor suppressor gene that is involved in the development of uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC), the most aggressive type of endometrial cancer. The research has identified a specific mutation in approximately 65 percent of UPSCs.

Hormonal Therapies. A Phase 2 trial is comparing an estrogen blocker and receptor modulator in patients with recurrent, metastatic endometrial cancer. An NSABP study found that progesterone exerts molecular effects in cancerous endometrial cells including cyclin p21 and p27 induction, decreasing proliferation and inhibiting invasion. In progesterone receptor B expressing cells, it induces a secretory phenotype. Array analysis also showed inhibition of a number of cellular adhesion molecules. Another study showed that in poorly differentiated endometrial cancer cells, the introduction of progesterone receptors A and B allowed progestin to re-exert regulatory effects on proliferation.

Alternate-substituted alkyl PCDFs are a new mechanism-based class of antiestrogens that block estrogen-induced mammary and endometrial cell/tumor growth via crosstalk between the ER and Ah receptor signaling pathways. These compounds have been shown to be relatively nontoxic, inhibit ER-positive and ER-negative mammary tumor growth, and synergize with tamoxifen to inhibit breast cancer growth and block tamoxifen-induced estrogenic activity in the uterus.

thank you
Posts: 77
Joined: Jun 2009

my mom has been diagnosed with stage 3c endometrial cancer a year ago. She had 4 cycles of chemo and 25 external with 2 internal radiation treatment.
she had a PET scan which shows increased uptake in vaginal cuff, and is having a second surgery in 2 weeks for a biopsy. We hope that this is not a recurrence but a radiation change.

She lives in Greece, I am a physician here in USA. She only knows that she has a precancerous disease.... well, this is what I, my brother (who is also a physician) and all the doctors in Greece are telling her (she is not stupid, she knows the truth, but she told us that she doesn't want to know much)
it is difficult to express all my feelings for the last year in one night. I only wanted to thank you because you are a real lesson of life.... My mom's cancer (she is 56 years old) has changed my life. I am trying not to complain, but I am miserable. And today, I read all your posts, and I see how optimistic you are.... It is a shame for me...
For all of you, thank you so much for being here. I wish my mom had the strength to fight with the disease. I wish I had the strength to fight....
But I will fight, much different from today since I found all you. The real fighters...

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

(Nice name) I appreciate your comments. It's nice to know that we have helped or made an impact on another. As for me, I can say that I've had MANY miserable days - and early on - before my husband found this site for me - I did not want to know anything either because all I found was dire news about UPSC. It scared the *&%$# out of me!!!!

Many people sent cards and said "take heart...stay strong...fight...don't give up...etc" Those words really inspired me plus the added info and encouragement I got and continue to get from this site.

I think your mom needs encouragement that this disease is treatable. I'm reading an interesting book (it's OLD - written in the 70's) called the Healing Mind written by a doctor, Irving Oyle. He talks about medicine - both traditional western and ancient tribal Mexican medicine and the "single unifying factor in these vastly different therapeutic situations is the doctor-patient relationship.....The pillars are faith, belief, and will...Both believe that the ritual and the healer's proficiency in its performance will invoke and direct the healing power." The BELIEF helps the body heal itself. That mind-body connection. So help your mother have hope in the future and faith in her practitioner and in the treatment". In "Getting Well Again" by Simonton he advises meditation that includes not only the patient seeing the disease being fought in whatever imagery the patient wants but in seeing ourselves doing the things we want to do in the future - having short as well as longterm goals and imagining that we are fulfilling them.

God Bless you and your family as you deal with the challenges that life-threatening illness brings to all of us. You remind me of the impact that one's life has on another - we are all connected. The priest at my mother's wake said "All mother's die too young!!" So true. Hang in there, stay strong and take heart....and THANK YOU.

Sincerely, Mary Ann aka Daisy

thank you
Posts: 77
Joined: Jun 2009

Mary Ann,

Since I found this site, I am reading all the posts and admire all of you, your courage, your humor, your hope.
Every day I will find something new in this site which tells me not to bother with simple daily problems. And of course it is not me who has the cancer but my mom, so I have to stay strong and help her. It is more difficult because she is in Greece, if I could be with her daily we would both feel much better. I was able to be with her for 3 months while she had her chemotherapy. It hurts so much when you are away from people you love.
Anyway, the negative PET result that was posted today made me so happy. Hopefully my mom's PET scan will be proven false positive also. We chose not to wait for re-scan later but do the surgery and biopsy, since if it is local recurrence still the prognosis is good and removal is the treatment. 16th of June is the surgery, 9 more days..... If only I could be with her in Greece.
I am speaking about this site to my husband every day, I actually think that everybody should read this site to realize that we should stop complaining for unimportant things.
Whatever happens to my mom, I will always have this site in my "favorites", and I will come here to learn from you. You will be here 10, 15, 20 years from now to help all the weak..
Well I have nothing to say but THANK YOU.
Chrysoula

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1429
Joined: Jan 2009

I will keep you and your family in my prayers. The unknown is so scary, and the waiting to find out results is even more scary. Glad your Mom has you for support even though it is from a distance. I can empathize with you about long distance relationships with family especially when the ones you love are sick. I went through that last year with my Mom. She was 94 years old and had surgery related to her poor circulation, and died from complications of the surgery. I was able to be with her at the hospital her last days. But when you cannot see them everyday, you wonder how things really are. Take care of yourself, and I pray the surgery goes well. HUGS to you.

dpennell
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2011

I had a complete hysterectomy about 2 yrs ago due to a stage 1 endometrial cancer diagnosis. All my checkups since then have been fine. However, besides the weight gain, night sweats, hot flashes, I have found that I have lost strength in my thigh muscles. I use to be able to walk to concerts, Nascar races, the Pony swim in Chincoteague, Virginia with no problem. After the surgery, my thighs have no muscle strength, and I become winded at the slightest walking. It is very discouraging.I am sure this is due to the loss in muscle strength due to age and menopause, and the extra weight I have put on. I drink plenty of water, eat more veggies and fruits, and take calcium supplements. Do i just have to resign myself that this is the way I will be? Debbie

Songflower's picture
Songflower
Posts: 632
Joined: Apr 2009

Dear Debbie,

I think you need to talk to your physician about this. I have never heard of it as a regular side effect of chemo. I have had chemo for about three years and do not have this side effect. You should be able to walk through menopause. The muscle weakness could be from neuropathy but certainly not the shortness of breath. I am not a physician but if I were you I would make an appt right away. Let us know how it comes out.

Diane

Songflower's picture
Songflower
Posts: 632
Joined: Apr 2009

Dear Debbie,

I think you need to talk to your physician about this. I have never heard of it as a regular side effect of chemo. I have had chemo for about three years and do not have this side effect. You should be able to walk through menopause. The muscle weakness could be from neuropathy but certainly not the shortness of breath. I am not a physician but if I were you I would make an appt right away. Let us know how it comes out.

Diane

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