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colon cancer recurrence port advice

rechelle1000
Posts: 3
Joined: Nov 2003

I'm looking for advice on where to have a port-o-cath placed. With my first bout of cancer I had a double lumens groshong. I've heard that a port-o-cath requires less maintence. I'm a very active person, so I want to go with the option that works best with full movement capabilities. I've heard that having the port placed in the arm, as opposed to the chest, is a good option. Anyone have an arm port?

Thanks,

Rechelle

slammer
Posts: 120
Joined: May 2004

Hi Rachelle. My name is Amy, this is my 2nd go around w/ chemo & I have what they call a PICC line in my upper left arm, Don't know if that is the same a what you say, but I haven't really had any trouble with if, got real red once but I really used my arm alot that time. I am real active also w/ a small daughter & I love to cook & just general going. Maybe that is what you had? My surgeon only does one other cath, maybe it is what you say sorry not much help, but my picc seems easy except covering daily to shower... Good Luck
Amy

MJay's picture
MJay
Posts: 132
Joined: Aug 2004

Hi Rechelle~
I can't comment on the port in the arm... didn't know that was an option. But I do have a port in my chest that is due to come out any time now (as soon as I can kick this horrid flu).

As much as I hated the port I am glad I did it. I know it saved the veins in my arm. I have had no real issues with the port location other than there is a noticable weakness on that side of my chest and into my arm. I had mine placed on the left side because I am right handed. The only challenge I had was the seatbelt cutting right across the port. I would imagine this wouldn't have been such a big deal if I had some "padding" but I was down to 102lbs by the time I was done with chemo and natural padding was not an option. I did get those pad covers for the seatbelt. That helped. And once winter hit and I was wearing winter coat it was a non issue then.

Hope this helps.

MJay

kerry's picture
kerry
Posts: 1317
Joined: Jan 2003

I had a recurrence also and had to have another port put in. I did the groshong port in my chest the second time around (same thing first time too). I didn't want anything in my arm, because I too am very active. I could play golf, swim, etc. and not worry. I didn't have any problems with either port and glad I did them. I didn't want to have to worry about covering my arm when I showered! The port in my chest gave me more flexibility and I could do everything.

Good luck. I finished my treatment (second time around) last month. My doctor has put me on what he calls a maintenance program of Xeloda and Celebrex. I have another scan in April to see if it is working.

My best to you.

Kerry

madu
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2005

Rechelle,

I had a double lumen port-o-catheter and I really liked it. I had it placed on my left side b/c I am right handed. It had to be flushed once a month (in or out of treatment). I loved it during treatment - they would hook in an IV and leave it there for the week - bliss for someone who doesn't like to be poked by needles. Since the port is placed between muscles it is very painful - esp. laying down and it was impossible to slip a shirt over your head - for at least a week. I also noticed a reduced capacity to lift with that arm for awhile. Over time - maybe two weeks - I didn't even notice it. My nieces said it looked like an alien was under my skin!

bsrules
Posts: 296
Joined: Mar 2004

Rachelle,

Hello!!! I can't tell you about a port in the arm as my husband had his placed in his chest. He was a very active man as far as work and working on his cars go. He had no trouble with his port. He wanted it in his chest due to the fack that he would be able to keep it cleaner then it would of been in his arm. He would of kept banging it as the work he used to do. He was also able to hide it in the summer as he was a t shirt man and didn't want anything showing on his arms when he met customers. It was easier there then risking his veins in his arms and having to have it done again.

Unfortunately, he lost his battle with this monster 11 weeks ago. I know that this has got to be VERY hard for you to have to go through again but PLEASE give it everything you have!!!!

Best Wishes and Prayers coming your way!!!!

Sue

JKendall
Posts: 186
Joined: Nov 2004

Hi Rechelle...my wife had a port placed in her chest on the left side back in October. It's a little uncomfortable sometimes, but well worth it I think. She's also pretty active, and it doesn't seem to bug her much. And it's easy to care for. Only draw backs: bra straps and seat belts sometimes aggitate it.

Good luck! Jimmy

grandma047's picture
grandma047
Posts: 381
Joined: Feb 2004

I had Hickman cath first time and didn't really like it because the cath hung down. I had to tape it up to take a shower. This time I have the double lumen infusaport. It's on the right side, under the skin and no problem at all. Sometimes if I hit it, it hurts, but other than that i don't even know its there.
If you have any more questions, let me know.
Love and prayers, Judy(grandma047)

nanuk's picture
nanuk
Posts: 1363
Joined: Dec 2003

Hi Rechelle: I'm not sure what the considerations are regarding the female anatomy, but from the posts, it doesn't seem to be an issue. I had a Hickman the first time, and it was a PIA-(although not located there..) bathing, dressing, etc. This time they placed a port-a-cath in the chest, and it has been great for infusion and blood draws-it's been in for a year without complications. BTW, both were installed with a local anesthesia, and I walked out of the OR an hour later. Nanuk

andyc56
Posts: 42
Joined: Oct 2004

My wife's double port had to be removed after the 7th of twelve treatments. One side had a leak from the get-go, the other side eventually malfunctioned also. She now has a PICC line in her arm, which so far seems to be just fine.

For her the port was a disaster and the cause of much pain and aggravation. Part of the problem appears to be hasty installation by a less than competent surgeon.

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