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Anybody can inform me?

kevco
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2004

Hello,

My father in-law has been diagnosed with PC 7.5 years ago, went throught Brachytherapy, went on vacation last October and according to him got an infection while away and his left leg swollen, started chemo and in July was hospitalized with severe kidney failure, we found out that the cancer was no longer curative, he now only have 1 kidney that is fonctioning with a bag and both leg are huge and red and the oncologist is waiting for a clinical trial.

The whole family including are in denial, any hope for him?

nutt
Posts: 140
Joined: Sep 2001

Unfortunately, we can not practice medicine but, suggest you sit down with your dad and his docotr(s) and have a heart to heart to find out the entire story?
"According" to your dad may have been a protective answer for the family.
Eitherway, there is always hope but hope with a real dose of knowledge of what/where/how the disease has progressed can be more helpful (reality) than the unknown guessing we all do.
This "denial" (asking others what his medical situtation is verse his doctors)can not help you and you may see some "opportunities" in that discussion that will lead to your dad pursuing a different treatment or second opinion or etc..
Generally, we are in a blur or state of denial when we were told we had cancer. Having a strong supportive family member can sometimes be an asset(without invading his right to make his own decisions).
See if your dad is willing for you both to see the doctor? Most doctors will sit and discuss. Have all of your questions in writing so you will ask them all and write the answer down. If you do not understand it, request, pursue or demand clarification. There are some medical providers that believe they know better than the patient in making major decisions.
Glad to see your dad has family that is interested and helping.
Stay in touch and good luck.
Joe

nodawgs's picture
nodawgs
Posts: 118
Joined: Mar 2001

I don't have an answer for this one, but to other readers, this is the primary reason PSA and frequent scan/MRI monitoring is critical. For instance, the first indication of a rising PSA might indicate need to intervene with an antiandrogen such as Casodex, likely including total androgen ablation. Whether the procedure elected was a radical prostatectomy, cryoablation, or brachytherapy (radioactive seed implant), frequent monitoring is extremely important to slow the metastatic process, whether soft tissue or bones.

I'm not qualified to inform anyone on treatment protocols for advanced prostate cancer other than, if possible, I'd select a facility using the most advanced, researched-based treatment protocols, including salvage therapies. Do a web search on the phrase, "best hospitals"...then, select "cancer." The one holding the number 1 ranking in the U.S. is the one managing my care. Having two types of unrelated, but lethal types of cancer (including prostate), I simply cannot say enough about them. In a nutshell, a trip to Houston could mean everything.

Best to your father in-law,

"Perry"

kevco
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2004

Hello everybody,

I haven't been in touch but our life was pretty hectic since last time I wrote. My father in-law is now in palliative care and we were told that he has 6-12 weeks. that was 6 weeks ago.

It's really hard to belive that it will happen as he has been improving lately beside the fatigue & nausea.

Tell me is it wrong for us to still think that it won't happen? I can't see it hapening, His mind is all there he started walking again with the walker. I know that the end is coming it just doesn't make sense when i see the other patients in the room with him that are some much more worst than him that this will happen to him.

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