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glassckm's picture

Adjuvant Intra-arterial Injection of Iodine-131-Labeled Lipiodol After Resection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Type: 
Article
Description: 

The high recurrence after surical resection of HCC is a major therapeutic challenge. This adjuvant treatment into the hepatic artery has been proposed by Lau WY, Leung TW, et al in previous studies. In 2005, treatment was in phase III clinical trials in Singapore.

Source: 
Hepatology
Author/Speaker/Performer: 
Eveline Boucher, Stephane Corbinais, Yan Rolland, et al.

BC Mets

Type: 
Web site

A Light in the Shadow

Type: 
Book
Description: 

This is a wonderful and heartwarming story told by the author and several family members about her father's last year after being diagnosed with cancer and the choices he and his family made. It takes you into the experiences the family and her father had in a way that pulls you in and keeps you reading. Great book telling the story of a man who is an example to us all about how to live and die with dignity and respect for his family, himself, and his beliefs in God and what laid before him upon his departure from this earth.

Source: 
Tate Publishing
Author/Speaker/Performer: 
Anna Zernickow
Publish date: 
2005
Bill67's picture

Prostate Cancer Foundation

Type: 
Web site
Description: 

They support Prostate Cancer research. They also have reading materials about Prostate Cancer. I first heard about the foundation when Safeway Grocery Stores were accepting donations for the foundation. I found the web site from a link on another web site.

btcat's picture

Grace Livingston Hill

Type: 
Web site
Description: 

I'm sharing this website not so much for the virtue of the website but to tell you all about an author that I love. Grace Livingston Hill has written over 100 inspiring and faithfilled books of fiction laced wonderfullly with God's messages. Some of her short stories are set in Biblical times making Biblical events come to life. I haven't read but a fraction of all of her books, but I hope to read them all someday. One of my greatest family inheritances is a collecion of Grace Livingston Hill's books that belonged to my grandmother.

Red Toe Nail

Type: 
Web site
Description: 

This site is provided by Dr. Phil Berman who is going thru cancer treatment & has allowed other cancer survivors to create blogs about their situation. My personal blog regarding inflammatory breast cancer is at http://cbuerger.redtoenail.org. The blog site is easy to set up & maintain.

Appendix Cancer (Appendiceal Carcinoma) and Peritoneal Surface Malignancy

Type: 
Web site
Description: 

Survivor story of a nurse diagnosed with Signet Ring Appendiceal Cancer. Site lists information and resources about appendix cancer, treatment options and also identifies specialists treating this rare cancer. Offers additional information about clinical trials, means for obtaining assistance with medical travel and practical advice for dealing with insurance and billing issues.

Ovarian Cancer Your guide to taking control

Type: 
Book
Description: 

A very useful, informative book. Covers things to know at diagnosis, chosing a Physician , treatment,
re-ocurrence and end of life issues.

Source: 
O'Reilly & Associates
Author/Speaker/Performer: 
Kristine Conner & Laauren Langford
Publish date: 
2003
gdpawel's picture

Test Identifies Patients who Benefit from Targeted Drugs

Type: 
Article
Description: 

As we enter the era of "personalized" medicine, it is time to take a fresh look at how we evaluate treatments for cancer patients. More emphasis should be put on matching treatment to the patient. Patients would certainly have a better chance of success had their cancer been chemo-sensitive rather than chemo-resistant, where it is more apparent that chemotherapy improves the survival of patients, and where identifying the most effective chemotherapy would be more likely to improve survival.

Findings presented at the 41st Annual Meeting of the European Society for Clinical Investigation in Uppsala, Sweden, April 18, 2007, concluded that "functional profiling" with cell culture assays is relevant for the study of both "conventional" and "targeted" anti-neoplastic drug agents (anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of Iressa, Tarceva, Sutent, Nexavar, and Avastin in primary cultures of "fresh" human tumors).

Cell Culture Assays with "cell-death" endpoints can show disease-specific drug activity, are useful clinical and research tools for "conventional" and "targeted" drugs, and provide unique information complementary to that provided by "molecular" tests. There have been more than 25 peer-reviewed publications showing significant correlations between cell-death assay results and patient response and survival.

Many patients are treated not only with a "targeted" therapy drug like Tarceva, Avastin, or Iressa, but with a combination of chemotherapy drugs. Therefore, existing DNA or RNA sequences or expression of individual proteins often examine only one compenent of a much larger, interactive process. The oncologist might need to administer several chemotherapy drugs at varying doses because tumor cells express survival factors with a wide degree of individual cell variability.

There is a tactic of using biopsied cells to predict which cancer treatments will work best for the patient, by taking pieces of live "fresh" tumor tissue, applying different chemotherapy treatments to it, and examining the results to see which drug or combination of drugs does the best job killing the tumor cells. A cell culture assay test with "functional profiling," using a cell-death endpoint, can help see what treatments will not have the best opportunity of being successful (resistant) and identify drugs that have the best opportunity of being successful (sensitive).

"Funtional profiling" measures the response of the tumor cells to drug exposure. Following this exposure, they measure both cell metabolism and cell morphology. The integrated effect of the drugs on the whole cell, resulting in a cellular response to the drug, measuring the interaction of the entire genome. No matter which genes are being affected, "functional profiling" is measuring them through the surrogate of measuring if the cell is alive or dead.

For example, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a protein on the surface of a cell. EGFR-inhibiting drugs certainly do target specific genes, but even knowing what genes the drugs target doesn't tell you the whole story. Both Iressa and Tarceva target EGFR protein-tyrosine kinases. But all the EGFR mutation or amplificaton studies can tell us is whether or not the cells are potentially susceptible to this mechanism of attack. They don't tell you if Iressa is better or worse than Tarceva or other drugs which may target this. There are differences. The drugs have to get inside the cells in order to target anything. So, in different tumors, either Iressa or Tarceva might get in better or worse than the other. And the drugs may also be inactivated at different rates, also contributing to sensitivity versus resistance.

As an example of this testing, researchers have tested how well a pancreatic cancer patient can be treated successfully with a combination of drugs commonly used to fight lung, pancreatic, breast, and colorectal cancers. The pre-test can report prospectively to a physician specifically which chemotherapy agent would benefit a cancer patient. Drug sensitivity profiles differ significantly among cancer patients even when diagnosed with the same cancer.

The "funtional profiling" technique makes the statistically significant association between prospectively reported test results and patient survival. It can correlate test results that are obtained in the lab and reported to physicians prior to patient treatment, with significantly longer or shorter overall patient survival depending upon whether the drug was found to be effective or ineffective at killing the patient's tumor cells in the laboratory.

This could help solve the problem of knowing which patients can tolerate costly new treatments and their harmful side effects. These "smart" drugs are a really exciting element of cancer medicine, but do not work for everyone, and a test to determine the efficacy of these drugs in a patient could be the first crucial step in personalizing treatment to the individual.

Source: 
Eur J Clin Invest 37 (suppl. 1):60, 2007
Contact information: 
phone: (714) 596-2100
Author/Speaker/Performer: 
Larry Weisenthal, M.D., Ph.D.
scottvs's picture

Friends Like Mine

Type: 
Audio/Video
Description: 

This song: Friends Like Mine
represents a volunteer campaign supporting the fight against Cancer. Written by a Cancer survivor, it was inpired by the the American Cancer Society Relay for Life.

Source: 
none
Contact information: 
phone: 616-738-7536 friendslikemine@charter.net
Author/Speaker/Performer: 
Scott Adam VanderSchel

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