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What cancer patients, their families, and caregivers need to know about COVID-19.

How were you diagnosed? Symptoms? Ultrasound etc?

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

My mom is waiting to have a d&c so they can take a biopsy to see if she has cancer. She had a thick endometrium of 6.7mm , and some spotting that only lasted a day we are all worried sick about her and she is already living as if she has it . I’m just wondering , if she does have it and it did spread to her ovaries and other places could the ultrasound find that? Also what were ur symptoms ? What was the thickness?  And how did they diagnose the stage?

NoTimeForCancer's picture
NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 2675
Joined: Mar 2013

Aliasalb, I am sure you, your mother, and entire family are very concerned.  While there may be a slight difference of opinion on this page, a D&C is good on assisting in diagnosing uterine cancer.  I would recommend you all trying (it is difficult) to take this one day at a time and find out what is going on.  IF, and that is not known yet, it is cancer, your mother will want to work with a gynecologic oncologist - her gyn should be able to refer her, but if not, she will have to ask.  

Irregular bleeding post menapause is usually a sign of an issue, however a woman does not have to be post menapause.  

The D&C is usually the first step and only after the tissue is looked at can they determine if she has cancer and the gyn onc will make a plan.  Please let us know she is doing and what the outcome is.  There is a wealth of information on these pages and the women here are wonderful.

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Thank you so much for ur reply

Primavera's picture
Primavera
Posts: 82
Joined: Mar 2019

November/December 2018: Spotting. Had spotting for two months. It disappeared sometimes and then it would come back.

January 2019. Went for a physicial. Primary physician sent me to have abdominal and transvaginal ultrasounds. Thickened endometrium 10mm, somewhat heterogeneous. But there was nothing else suspicious. They even said "smalish size uterus". Ovaries were OK. No masses. So I guess ultrasounds do give you an idea of what's there, or not?

February 2019. Gynecologist visit. Pap smear normal. Got a biopsy a few days later. Was told 3 weeks later that there was not enough tissue for a biopsy (a whole month went by!).

March 2019. Pre-admission tests for a D&C; then the actual D&C. I had an appointment for results for April 10, but my gynecologist wanted to see me right away, so I knew results were not good. Diagnosed with adenocarcinoma FICO type 3 (the garden variety of uterine cancer, but aggressive). My gynecologist said she couldn't treat me anymore; picked up the phone herself and called the gynecologist oncologist they had in their team for these cases.

April 2019. Scans were done for the hysterectomy and I had two nodules on my lungs (surprise) and a tiny cyst in my liver; but they could see on those scans that everything else was clear. Had hysterectomy April 15 and doctor came back next day to tell me that lymph nodes they took out came out clear and that I had no spread. Stage 1a (you get the actual stage at the hysterectomy; I know some doctors try to guess it ahead of time).

June 2019. Got preventive brachytherapy.

Watching lung nodules now with CT scans every 3 months, but they just moved me to 6 months watch for those.

Please try to take it easier. I know I got cancer, but a lot of the biopsies and D&Cs don't come out positive for cancer.

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Hello and thank you for ur reply. I’m confused though how could you have stage 1 if it was already in your lungs? Or did i misunderstand something? 

Primavera's picture
Primavera
Posts: 82
Joined: Mar 2019

Although I've never smoked, I have lung nodules, but I've found out they're very common. Some people have them and they are found by accident when CT scans are done. I almost never went to the doctor before. I'm 57. Spent all those years very healthy until this year. A cold or two once a year; healthy weight and no illnesses otherwise. I never had an operation before, or anesthesia for anything. If not for this cancer, I wouldn't have found out about the lung nodules.

They're stable. I had two at 2mm and 4mm in March before the operation, and they were the same size in September and now in December. It doesn't have to be a metastasis for sure. Also, they could always be a second kind of cancer, unrelated. I've read about people who have had two unrelated cancers at the same time. I'm glad they've found them because they can be monitored now.

My tumor was less than a centimeter and inside the uterus. No spread anywhere else, so stage a1 was what I got.

A recurrence is always possible, even from stage 1a, but some people never have one.

I had genetic testing done and I had one gene (for breast cancer) come out as a possible mutation (one of those undetermined things), so they're checking me out every six months with mammographies, too.

cmb's picture
cmb
Posts: 444
Joined: Jan 2018

In 2007 I had post menopausal bleeding and an ultrasound showed a thickened endometrial stripe of 5 mm. A polyp was removed during the D&C/hysteroscopy and the pathology showed the polyp was benign. No further action was needed.

In 2016, I had vaginal bleeding again. The ultrasound again showed a thickened endometrial stripe – this time it was larger at 2.0 cm. I had also lost about 7-8 pounds without trying. The tissue removed during the subsequent D&C/hysteroscopy showed that I had cancer. I then had surgery, chemo and radiation.

Should the D&C/hysteroscopy indicate cancer, it will identify the type of uterine cancer (there are different types). But as NoTime explained, the stage will be identified during the following hysterectomy.

In the meantime, keep in mind that most cases of post-menopausal bleeding are not caused by cancer.

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Hello and thank you for replying . what stage were you diagnosed with? And how many rounds of chemo did you need? Did the polyp in 2007 bave anything to do with cancer?

cmb's picture
cmb
Posts: 444
Joined: Jan 2018

The 2007 polyp was not related at all to the 2016 diagnosis of cancer. After the hysterectomy I was diagnosed as Stage 3B, uterine carcinosarcoma (one of the rare types of uterine cancer). Because this cancer is a rare type, the medical oncologist proposed a chemo treatment plan in two phases for a total of eight chemo cycles. I then had radiation as a preventative measure afterwards. You can read more about my treatment history by clicking on my user name (cmb) under my picture and reading my profile.

But please remember that I was diagnosed with an unusual form of cancer, so my chemo plan wasn't the typical program prescribed for most women with uterine cancer. And even if your mother is eventually diagnosed with cancer, the most common type of uterine cancer is often treated with surgery only, if caught early enough.

Forherself's picture
Forherself
Posts: 309
Joined: Jan 2019

Sorry to hear about your Mother's issues.   Here are some statistics that might put things in perspective.  About 1 in 10 biopsies or polyps are positive for cancer.   About 80% of those are endometrioid endometrial cancer.   It is a slow growing type and is usually discovered early.  The other ~20 % are high grade endometrial cancer.  These are faster growing and have higher stage at staging.  They are rare.  Your mother will have a biopsy and if there are abnormal cells she will be referred to a gyncologiial oncologist.  This person will do a total hysterectomy and peolvic wash, lymph node biopsy and omentum biopsy.  This will determine the type and stage.   You have lots of time to read about this.  And ask questions.  You an read my bog to read my story.  

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Thank you so much for your reply ! 

EZLiving66's picture
EZLiving66
Posts: 1383
Joined: Oct 2015

I was 63 and just didn't feel right - sometime I'd have a cramp in my lower belly or feel like I was full when I hadn't eaten. I went to a new doctor who told me in her Communist accent, "You get old." I KNEW something was wrong so I went to see another doctor who said if I thought something was wrong, it probably was. She sent me to a gynecologist who did a biopsy of my uterus. It came back as regular old uterine cancer. She set me up with an oncologist/gynecologist who did the hysterectomy. I had an appointment in three weeks but the next week, his office called and asked if I could come in the next day. I already knew I had cancer so I didn't understand why they wanted to see me so soon. My oncologist/gynecologist explained the type of cancer I had was rare and very aggressive - UPSC. He scheduled me for a port with chemo to start the next day. He hadn't taken any lymph nodes so they didn't know if it had spread. I had a CT scan and chest x-rays and luckily they found nothing else. Unfortunately, I was one of those people that had a really bad reaction to the chemo and only made it through three chemos. That was over four years ago and, knock-on-wood, it hasn't recurred.

Good luck to your mother and as others have said, don't get too far ahead of yourself. The waiting drives you nuts but if she does need additional treatment, PLEASE come back here to get additional information. I so wish I had found this place before my chemo. I suffer from terrible neuropathy and probably wouldn't have if I had known about icing and other treatments available. These ladies here are just a wealth of information!

Love,

Eldri

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Yes the waiting has to be the hardest part ... its been horrible honestly . How thick was your endometriam if you dont mind me asking ? And did you not bleed at all? 

EZLiving66's picture
EZLiving66
Posts: 1383
Joined: Oct 2015

They didn't do an ultrasound so I don't know how thick and I had no bleeding. 

Love,

Eldri 

Kathy G.'s picture
Kathy G.
Posts: 213
Joined: Dec 2012

I was very fortunate my garden variety uterine cancer was found very early - stage 1a/grade 1. Only required a hysterectomy. Will have 7 years NED January 2020.

 

I was post menopausal at 55 when I had light spotting after my mother's passing. I attributed it to stress and a UTI.

A few months later I passed a huge clot at work...out of nowhere. I knew something was wrong. Saw my regular gynecologist who confirmed cancer and referred me to a gynecological oncologist.

The waiting was the worst part...waiting for the biopsy results, waiting to see the oncologist, waiting for the surgery & waiting for the stage & grade after surgery. The things you imagine can make you crazy!

One of the best pieces of advice I got here is that cancer is a a treatable disease these days...not an automatic death sentence.

TRY to bear that in mind!

.Come back to update us. Warm regards!

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Sorry for the loss of your mother ... and i’m glad it was At stage 1. How thick was your endometriam if you dont mind me asking ? And thank you i really wish she would understand that it doesnt have to be a death sentence, she seems to have already given up the battle before it even started...

CheeseQueen57's picture
CheeseQueen57
Posts: 869
Joined: Feb 2016

I had Stage 3c, Grade 3 diagnosed in March 2016. Reoccurred in 2017. It's been a rough and rocky road but tell your mother it will be 4 years in March since my diagnosis and I'm still kicking, not as high, but still kicking! I'm 62. 

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Im so sorry it came back. I’m confused though how does it come back if they do a hysterctomy? Did it come back somewhere else? Also how were you diagnosed? 

CheeseQueen57's picture
CheeseQueen57
Posts: 869
Joined: Feb 2016

In the peritoneal area. I had bleeding. Ultimately diagnosed with D&C and then hysterectomy. You can read my profile. 

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

,Was it continues bleeding and was it heavy or light? Also i see that they found a mass that they thought was a fibroid? 

MAbound
Posts: 963
Joined: Jun 2016

I'm glad your mom is having a d&c rather than a biopsy like I had. I had visible cancer in my cervix that could be removed, but otherwise cancer can be missed by a biopsy if they don't sample from just the right spot. 

A d&c can diagnose that 1) you definietly have cancer or not 2) the type of uterine cancer you have and 3) the grade of cancer you have. It cannot diagnose what stage you are. Keep in mind that cancer can be missed in some scenarios, but that some tests are better at detection than others like a d&c is less likely to miss something than a biopsy. Ultrasounds just point to the need for more testing and really aren't definitive about cancer's presense or absence by themselves. 

It's important to know that there is more than one type of uterine cancer. Endometrial Adenocarcinoma is the most common type, whereas others such as UPCS, MMMT, and others are rarer and generally more aggressive and harder to cure. The type of cancer found can influence treatment decisions as you would want to treat an early stage, low grade aggressive type more aggressively than a like-staged/graded adenocarcinoma.

Grade indicates the degree of mutation the cancer cells have. Grade 1 cells most closely resemble normal cells whereas Grade 3 cells show the greatest degree of mutation and indicate a need for more aggressive treatment than lower grades. Grade 3 cancers carry higher risk of recurrence, so again, you kind of want to throw the kitchen sink at them during frontline treatment irregardless of stage.

If your mother is diagnosed with cancer and sent to a gyn-oncologist, the first visit will involve a pelvic exam and because most people want an idea of what they are facing, she may also get a "guestimate" as to what stage she is. It's important to understand that staging can only be finalized following surgery (hysterectomy) after they test all of the tissue that they remove. Any staging given prior to that is subject to change. Getting those pathology results can take anywhere from a week to several weeks. The wait for those results can be really hard, so  you kind of need to be mentally prepared for that.

It's really hard to live with something like this hanging over your head. It takes a while to get diagnosed, wait for results, get needed appointments, have the surgery, recover, and finally get results that tell you if you need anything more or not. When you get a cancer diagnosis, you want it out, like yesterday, and you worry that it's continuing to spread while you are doing all of the waiting that is involved. Fortunately, this tends to be a slow-growing cancer so there is no need to panic about it. Waiting is something we have all had to do a lot of, so we can attest to the fact that it's not going to be a big factor in any outcome. I hope hearing that helps you and your mom to get through what you may be facing, but the best outcome from the d&c would be a negative diagnosis and I am hoping for that for her. 

As scary as a cancer diagnosis can be, for this cancer, at least, they have made leaps and bounds in it's treatment and curability in recent years. It can be a long stretch of time to get from diagnosis, to surgery, and through treatment if it's needed, but it's doable and there is a lot of support for getting through it here. There are a lot of variables involved, so the experience and outcomes really vary from individual to individual depending on what they bring to the table. It's really important to remind onself of that if you make the mistake of Googling any statistics. Don't do it. They are often outdated and are generalities that really don't apply to individuals and only serve to scare people.

Your mom is really past the point of comparing endometrial thicknesses or amount of bleeding to others to give you the answer you want one way or the other. It's going to take the d&c to do that. If she is past menopause, any bleeding is not normal, so getting that investigated is what has to be done, so you all are doing the right thing in the right order. Dealing with cancer is always a one-step-at-a-time process that is more of a marathon than a sprint in regards to progress. It's not easy to deal with all of the anxiety over a prolonged period of time as you get through this. Hopefully it will help you to settle in for the long haul knowing how this works.

Hang in there and feel good that your mother has you looking out for her. 

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Thank you for all of your information, honestly i’m just trying to calm her down by finding people who ended up not having cancer or by showing her that people with cancer had different symptoms. Yes it could be giving her false hope and yes i know she could end up having cancer , but if it lets her sleep and eat for the next few weeks then so be it . And i’m confused , how could you have a biopsy without a d&c? They are going to be doing a pap smear first (not sure why) and then after that they will do a d&c ro take a biopsy of her endometriam. The wait is horrible and her home has become the most deppressing place on earth and she hasnt even got the diagnosis yet but zi understanD i guess

NoTimeForCancer's picture
NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 2675
Joined: Mar 2013

An endometrial biopsy, which can be done in the office, takes a small sample from the uterine lining and can be very painful - my gyn abandoned that quiickly and we moved on to the D&C which was done under a general anesthesia.  

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Also what do you mean you had visible cancer in ur cervix?  could they see it in the ultrasound ? Or in the pap smear?

MAbound
Posts: 963
Joined: Jun 2016

Here's a link that explains the difference between the different tests for endometrial cancer:

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/endometrial-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/how-diagnosed.html

My cancer originated near the neck of the uterus and grew down into the cervix as well as up into the fundus. There was visible abnormal tissue that they could see during a pelvic exam, so they knew where to biopsy without doing a d&c. I had a stage 3a, grade 3 cancer, so it was not caught early. I am three years post treatment and remain NED (no evidence of disease). I had chemo, radiation, and hormone therapy to treat my cancer. My oncologist is pretty sure I'm cured even though I technically have a few more years to go before it's official.

Getting diagnosed with this cancer is not a death sentence. It's very treatable, but it is a long process to get to the other side.Getting from suspicions to the other side of treatment can eat up the better part of a year, but there are stretches in the midst of it all that you are well enough to just live your day-to-day life while doing it. We all have that initial panic in the beginning because cancer is still a big deal, but you will find as you learn more and more about it that the science has come such a long way in recent years from what we grew up hearing about. 

The big responsibility of a patient with a cancer diagnosis is: Don't be a passive patient. Read so you can ask lots of questions and understand the answers you get. Get input from multiple sources when you are faced with decisions you don't feel qualified to make. There is always time to get 2nd and even 3rd opinions. Knowledge puts you back in control when you feel helpless. I know that doesn't always feel fair or reasonable, but that's the reality. It's all a bit overwhelming in the beginning...like having an elephant to eat, but if you take it one bite at a time it can be done. 

Should the worse happen and you get a positive diagnosis, remember you and your mother won't be alone to get through this. We are all here to help you get down that road should you need it. It's still a chore, though, and it helps to get oneself into a "I'm going to do what it takes" frame of mind. The anxiety isn't easily dismissed, so if it's impacting your mom like you are saying it is, consider getting her to ask for an anti-anxiety med. She needs to be rested and nourished to be in a good place before she faces the physically demanding stuff. She won't be the first to need to do so and any good doctor would understand that.

Hope that helps.

Pat

MoeKay
Posts: 247
Joined: Feb 2004

I had intermittent spotting around the time of menopause, so both my gynecologist and I thought it was just a menopausal symptom.  My ultrasound showed an endometrial stripe measuring approximately 7.3 mm.  The ultrasound also found a mass which was characterized as a "probable fibroid."  However, both my pap smear and endometrial biopsy showed endometrial adenocarcinoma.  After my surgery, my gynecologic oncologist said I had no "fibroid," but what the radiologist was characterizing as a probable fibroid on my ultrasound was the major site of my cancer.  I was diagnosed in April 1999, so this April will be 21 years. 

Your mother is lucky to have someone who is looking out for her best interests.  Keep us posted and good luck to your mom.  Waiting to find out what's going on is difficult. 

 

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Ugh well that makes me feel horrible especially since she had a fibroid . And her thickness was 6.7 so not far off from you ... what stage was it ? And what kind of treatment did you need 

MoeKay
Posts: 247
Joined: Feb 2004

Hi Aliasalb, I'm very sorry to hear that the information in my post made you feel horrible.  I wanted to make clear that, unlike your mother, I never had a fibroid.  The ultrasound I had before surgery only called the mass found a probable fibroid, but that turned out to be wrong.  If your mother has had fibroids in the past, it's possible that she may have new fibroids that could be causing the spotting.  To answer your other questions in your above post, my cancer was a surgical stage 1C, grade 2, but my gyn-onc clinically staged my cancer as 2B, grade 2.  The reason for the two different stages is that my surgeon did not agree with the pathologist's staging.  I had surgery and radiation.  I will answer the questions you pose in your next post after thst post.  When is your mother scheduled to have her biopsy? 

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Also im just wondering did u have the very rare incident where a fibroid was cancerous? Because from my understanding correct me if i’m wrong, uterine cancer doesnt appear as a mass but as a thicknned endometriam , but in some cases there are fibroids that turn into cancer?

Forherself's picture
Forherself
Posts: 309
Joined: Jan 2019

Endometrial cancer can be in a polyp, the myometrium (the uterus is made of muscle) the endometrium,  We have all found that each person is a statistic of one.  Each person is different.  I had an endometrial stripe but I had no malignancy in my hysterectomy specimen.   You just cannot know until a biopsy is done, and then if needed a total hysterectomy with staging.  It is a scary time.  Keep asking questions.  I had serous carcinoma confined to a polyp.   I did not have treatment.  I am a year and a half out with no recurrence.  Each case is different.  HOpefully, your mother can get the biopsy done so you can have more information.

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Thank you , she is just loosing it , she is living as if she already has it and already has it at stage 4, she’s basically saying her goodbyes and whatnot its crazy but i dont know what to do anymore . She doesnt even want to go through with the biopsy because “what if i have it then i’ll loose everything“

Forherself's picture
Forherself
Posts: 309
Joined: Jan 2019

If she is thinking about not having the biopsy, it may help if she has counselling.  There are people who have dealt with this problem before. The challenge is getting your mother together with one.  Her family doctor could help.   You two could go together and explain your mothers fear.   There are also cousellors who deal with this.  Your family doctor will have a list of mental health providers.  A gynecological oncologist office would also be a good resourse but it doesn't sound like she has one yet.  If a gynecological oncologist is doing her biopsy that office could help.  You can tell providers your concerns.  She really should have a biopsy. 

 

MoeKay
Posts: 247
Joined: Feb 2004

Aliasalb, in response to your above post, as I mentioned previously, I did not have a cancerous or non-cancerous fibroid.  According to my gynecologic oncologist, the major site of my uterine cancer was a mass (tumor) measuring approximately 4 centimeters in diameter.  It's my understanding that in extremely rare cases, a cancerous fibroid can occur, which is known as leiomyosarcoma.  Here's a link to information on fibroids which you might find helpful: https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/uterine-fibroids.

For some reason, I was not able to post this response right after your second post with questions for me as I did for your first post.  I tried several times, but this post kept appearing at the bottom of the thread. 

All the best,

Maureen

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Thank you for answering me , its been a horrible week waiting to get the d&c done . What stage was your cancer and have you been cancer free since ? I’m sorry but i’m still confused about the mass they thought was a fibroid but turned out to be a mass ... my mom has what they also thought was a fibroid and it measures 7 x 6 cm . I’m just wondering if she could be like you and could also have a mass that they keep mistaking as a fibroid ? 

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Sorry I just saw where u already responded to the stage and stuff . on my mom’s ultrasound they both (she had two done) said it was a fibroid they didnt state it was a “probable” one . Do u think that makes a difference ? also i guess that was good that it was a stage 1 or 2 right? Not good but better i mean , have you been cancer free since? 

 

Fridays Child
Posts: 126
Joined: Jul 2019

The ultrasound may not be able to definitively differentiate between a fibroid and a cancerous tumor.  I had a fibroid and a separate cancerous tumor.  It has been nearly 8 years since I was diagnosed at first.  It has now been two years since I was diagnosed with a Stage 4 recurrence.  Please tell her that Stage 4 is not an automatic death sentence now.  There are many new treatments and in some cases (as mine) even if you don't achieve No Evidence of Disease status, you may be able to treat it as a chronic disease and to live a relatively normal life.   Best of luck to you and your mom!

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

So sorry it came back ... was it stage 4 when they first caught it? Was it an aggressive type of cancer? I hope you get well very soon

Fridays Child
Posts: 126
Joined: Jul 2019

It was stage 1a when I was first diagnosed.  I had surgery and bracchytherapy (internal radiation) and after 5 years was discharged from the cancer center.  Then it came back.  They call it a late recurrence, and no, it is not an aggressive form.  Apparently I am a very unusual case for it to come back so late.  But I'm doing well and living my life (I exercise daily and look after my 3 year old granddaughter several days a week, even when I was having chemo) so I'd say it slowed me down a little but it hasn't stopped me.

Your mom shouldn't give up before she gets started.  It may not even be cancer.

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

That is very strange i’m so sorry you have to go through this again . Do you have a fanily history of cancer ? Also could you tell me more about how you were diagnosed and what your symptoms were

Fridays Child
Posts: 126
Joined: Jul 2019

Yes, I do have a family history of cancer, though not this particular one.  Genetic testing was negative for any known hereditary cancers. My original diagnosis was based on post-menopausal bleeding, then D&C confirmed cancer.  The recurrence was found when I consulted my orthopedic doctor about hip pain, and the MRI revealed the pelvic mass.  Subsequent biopsy confirmed it was the original cancer, and PET scan showed metastasis in both lungs. I'm down to one nodule in one lung now, which is hollow and thin and they aren't really concerned about it at the moment.  The hip tumor is still there, but whether it's active or not we don't know.

Armywife's picture
Armywife
Posts: 354
Joined: Feb 2018

Fear is a powerful thing.  I can promise you that y'all want to conserve your energy - it is so easy to let your mind run wild and all of us have done it to some extent.  But everyone here can tell you that it's too early for panic.  When I had my ultrasound, I was told I needed a biopsy because my endometrial stripe was 17mm instead of under 5mm as it should be.  In retrospect, I should have had a d&c, but I didn't know better then.  The gynecologist told me that 95% of the time, it's just a fibroid and not a big deal.  I was one of the 5% who had cancer.  The gyn/onc told me that 95% of endometrial cancers are stage IA, and will just require a hysterectomy and no further treatment - with a 93% survival rate.  The odds are really in your mom's favor.  And even if the worst happens, as it did to me (pathology report Stage IVB, Grade 2), I'M STILL HERE!  And your mom can be too! I reached the two-year mark in October and am currently without evidence of disease.  Please let her know that the d&c is the correct next step, and that there are a lot of women here who have walked through the trial and come out victorious - and thousands more who had their hysterectomies and went on with their lives.  She can do this!

Aliasalb
Posts: 19
Joined: Dec 2019

Why should you have had the d&c first? And what kind of treatment did you need? Also what kind of symptoms did you have if any? 

Armywife's picture
Armywife
Posts: 354
Joined: Feb 2018

D&C is the better choice because biopsy is a little piece through a thin tube, and it could miss a tumor.  This is why you should be encouraged that the d&c was ordered for your mom.  I had hysterectomy, then chemo.  I didn't have symptoms prior to diagnosis except for one tiny episode of spotting.  I had the ultrasound to check on my kidneys, and the thickened endometrium was an incidental finding. 

Donswife48
Posts: 314
Joined: Nov 2015

Cancer doesn't follow rules, someone's cancer is not the same as another.  Symptoms are many, or few, for all of us.  It's like many diseases, your moms health concerns may or may not be cancer, or stage 1 or stage 4.  I understand you are trying to find set symptoms to say mom's isn't like that, or mom's symptoms are exactly that.  And with the knowledge that I am stage 3, yet having no evidence of disease 4 years after treatment, and reading news that others who were stage 1 have aready died, it won't be the same for any of us, including your mom.  If the next appt isn't in the next week, maybe you and your mom need to ask her doctor about something to calm her down.  As many have said, we are a statistic of one.  Hugs

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