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SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 958
Joined: Apr 2017

Vitamin D again (second to, or perhaps equal to exercise, in my opinion Vitamin D is the best non-chemo strategy to combat colon cancer): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960076018302954?via%3Dihub

[C]alcitriol [Vitamin D] has an array of potential protective effects against CRC by acting on carcinoma cells, CAFs, immune cells and probably also the gut microbiota.

Vitamin D and African Americans: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29964038

We found vitamin D to increase expression of UPP1, leading to reduce uridine-induced DNA damage, in colon cells and organoids. A polymorphism in UPP1 found more frequently in African Americans than European Americans reduced UPP1 expression upon cell exposure to 1α,25(OH)2D3. Differences in expression of UPP1 in response to vitamin D could contribute to the increased risk of CRC in African Americans.

Acai: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0200101

The results of this review suggest that açaí is safe and can be used as a chemoprotective agent against cancer development. Açaí therapy may be a novel strategy for treating cancer.

Less soda and red meat, more fish:  https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v24/i24/2617.htm

A better adherence to the [Mediterranian Diet], specifically low intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and red meat as well as high intake of fish, is related to lower odds for advanced polyps.

How necessary is follow up? http://kjim.org/journal/view.php?doi=10.3904/kjim.2018.204

[M]ore evidence is needed to prove that monitoring CRC patients intensively after curative resection improves overall survival. Overly intensive surveillance such as CT scans every 3 months should be avoided until evidence warrants otherwise. However, considering that the purpose of surveillance of CRC is to identify patients with metachronous disease who may be good candidates for curative resection, intensive surveillance can be justified in high-risk patients and stage IV resected patients.

Another side effect of chemo? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29957058 (abstract only):

Chemotherapy reduces tumor burden by inducing cell death; however, the resulting dead tumor cells, or debris, may paradoxically stimulate angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumor growth.

Curcumin (Tumeric) again.  It seems to be the "hottest" supplement out there: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29956726 (abstract only):

the present data demonstrated that curcumin attenuated resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through induction of apoptosis of CSCs among colon cancer cells. These findings may provide novel evidence for the therapeutic application of curcumin in CRC intervention.

And again: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30097113

Turmeric extract was demonstrated for the first time for its anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects in both colorectal cancer cells and orthotopic mouse model through regulation of multiple targets. These findings strongly suggested the promising use of turmeric extract as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer patients with metastasis.

BGNor's picture
BGNor
Posts: 29
Joined: Feb 2018

Really interesting info about Curcumin and more linked info at the article page. Will take a closer look at that.

Thanks for sharing!

BG

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 958
Joined: Apr 2017

Updated with five new articles.

BGNor's picture
BGNor
Posts: 29
Joined: Feb 2018

Researchers has found a new way of delivering curcumin to cancer cells, by sidestepping the problem that curcumin is insoluble in water. Combined with platinum the curcumin has also be come more effective.

https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-08/uoic-sii080618.php

Regards, Bjorn

BGNor's picture
BGNor
Posts: 29
Joined: Feb 2018

Stumbeled across an episode of the BBC program 'Trust me I'm a doctor' yesterday, where they did quite a large study on the effects of Curcumin (Turmeric). Almost 100 participants divided in 3 groups. 1 control group(placebo), 1 group taking turmeric supplements in pill form and 1 group taking turmeric powder.

Here they proved a clear effect of Turmeric powder on DNA methylation, which is one of the effects thats make cells cancerous. Another interesting thing was that people using dietary supplements did not have any effect - only the powder group. Something to keep in mind for anyone wanting to try this out.

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/PSTGKKt3HR08tmK69w7J1b/does-turmeric-really-help-protect-us-from-cancer

However, if Turmeric can help when you already got cancer wasn't adressed. Still an interesting find.

 

Cheers, Bjorn

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Thanks SB! Funny, I was just wondering the other day where the 'dead' cancer cells actually go. How they're eliminated from the body, if at all.

Jan

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1292
Joined: Oct 2010

on vitamin D3 if you were now NED ?

or if you are mCRC recurrent? 

 

Food for thought:

Dr Joe about vitamin D3 on cancer treatment (2007 video)

Dr Joe about vitamin D3 on cancer treatment (video )

VitaminDwiki - after cancer dx

VitaminDwiki on toxicity

Vitamin Dwiki on CRC

We actually buy a combo of mega D3 (since 2010, ranging up to 80,000 iu) and megaK2 with IV vitamin C (magnesium, too), celecoxib, PSK and 5FU-LV for "chemo forever", along with supplements.

Note: At high vitamin D intakes, restriction of excess calcium supplements, extra megavitamin K2 as menatetrenone, and adequate magnesium are required for long term safety.   Best with studied, experienced medical supervision interested in this issue.

 

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 958
Joined: Apr 2017

I am currently NED for 1.4 years.  I am not approaching this too radically.  Now that it is sunny (I tan for 30 minutes a day in the noontime sun), I was taking 5,000IU about every five days.  But I got my D levels back and they were 60ng/dl, where I want them over 80, so I have gone back to 5,000IU about every day.  I do supplement magnesium and K and do not take calcium when I take D, but I do get a fair amount of calcium from milk, yogurt, cheese and perhaps brocolli.  I really do not have a good understanding of the D/calcium relationship.

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1292
Joined: Oct 2010

...kidneys.  Just keep your blood calcium below the upper limit of normal and take Mg & K2 with megaD3.  

There is another level for calculation that is used medically, as the product of [calcium][phosphorous].  This is a zero tolerance value for (avoiding) calcium precipitation in the kidneys. 

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