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Cancer is actually Fungus?

beemurguia's picture
beemurguia
Posts: 57
Joined: Mar 2017

So, I was diagnosed with RCC as a result of incidental finding post low back injury.  I have a 8cm tumor at my right kidney.  I am scheduled for a radical nephrectomy until 5/9/17...finally!  I have been waiting since mid March.  Naturally have been researching alternative treatments because the thought of losing an organ has set in and finally not very satisfied with that approach.  

I stumbled upon a crazy theory that cancer is actually a result of Candida/fungus infection.  Our immune system reacts and tries to fight or ward off the parasitic fungus thus causing the tumor to occur.  A controversial Italian Dr. Simoncini, Tulio says that he has treated and cured cancer patients by literally treating the tumor with sodium bicarbonate (baking soda).  Yes, baking soda! OMG...why did I stumble on to this information....now Im questioning everything!!!!  Am I the only one? Is is possible that conventional medicine is not willing to accept a simple treatment like this to cure cancer? He has faced a lot of controversy obviously but claims to have cured people for 20yrs plus.  

I know we are all at the mercy of our Drs and HMO's etc and I dont mean to add more confusion or conflict but I figure this is the appropriate forum to bring up such discussions....I was very positive and patient with the wait and accepting of the idea of a nephrectomy but now Im reluctant and wondering if I should be open to alternative treatments.

More information about this on his website www.cancerfungus.com

What are your thoughts?

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

I'm not really familiar with this guy, haven't heard this theory before.  A quick glance at his website says that he's found c.albicans in patients with cancer. I'm totally not surprised. Does this mean I think he's on to something? Nope. It's also found (although he doesn't state this) in healthy people. It's commonly found in our body's natural flora. 

I get your not wanting to lose an organ. Heck, I still had all my organs (with the exception of my tonsils and adenoids) that I arrived on the planet with.  I had no visible scars. But I decided that the best way to get rid of that mess of a mass on my kidney was to get the sucker out. Sure there are alternative treatments, but do those alternative treatments have peer reviewed published results in medical journals? What's their track record?  How many people have been successfully treated with these methods? What's considered best practices?

Here's a website you might find interesting. It's written by a pathologist from the Netherlands (nice to find a pathologist with a sense of humor). http://www.123hjemmeside.dk/cancer_is_not_a_fungus/21160724

Yes, there are times when new medical practices turn the old ones upside down.  Take stomach ulcers, for example. Reading about this fungus / sodium bicarb theory, though, doesn't seem quite "it."

sucotai
Posts: 19
Joined: Jan 2017

I'm usually not against non-conventional therapy, but this one is just nuts. It feeds on the fear and desperation of cancer patients. Disgusting.

Steve.Adam's picture
Steve.Adam
Posts: 460
Joined: Oct 2016

There are many stories of cancer cures and I'm sure many are true.

In certain situations I would investigate the alternatives seriously.

But in my case the standard treatment was a no brainer because of the very high probability of complete success.  It's so lucky to have a functioning spare.

I should read the other cancer forums here. Alternatives must be often discussed.

Steve.

beemurguia's picture
beemurguia
Posts: 57
Joined: Mar 2017

Yes, Im curious and interested in alternative medicine too and so far most threads have been about nephrectomy....I just hope that they get it all out with my radical and cross my fingers it did not spread...meanwhile will continue probing into alternative therapies in case this sucker decides to come back! 

Which by the way is around the corner.  I had my preop appointment today and for a radical nephrectomy at Kaiser Hospital setting in Northern CA is less than 23 hours??? Ay vey! they kick you right out dont they? 

 

 

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

Bee, They "kick you right out" if it's appropriate for you to be discharged. 

Should something come up and you have to be readmitted, it's a big black mark on their report and they have to explain why they let you go when you came right back.  Not a cool thing for them to have to justify. 

I don't have Kaiser coverage, but while I was scheduled to be discharged the next day, I was so sleepy / groggy, they weren't going to try to get me to walk with me dozing off sitting on the side of my bed, legs dangling over the side.  The nurse looked at me flopping back over for the 3rd or 4th time and said, "Hey. No rush," which cracked me up (even if I immediately zonked out asleep again). 

So, they have a few things to get taken care of: You walk, you pass gas, you pee, your pain is under control, you know how to deal with your drain (if you have one and it's left in), you possibly get your catheter out, you have a discharge plan (i.e. a way to get home, someone to check on you, know what to do if you have complications).  Then they do their kicking.

Then you go home and feel wretched, and sleeeeeeeeep (Getting up periodically to pee, walk, and get back in bed). The second day home is way better than the first day home, and so on...

Steve.Adam's picture
Steve.Adam
Posts: 460
Joined: Oct 2016

Do you get sent home less than a day after surgery? That seems too soon. But maybe if you're just resting in bed it might as well be your own bed.

Even something as simple as eating healthy natural food feels like alternative medicine.

Steve.

 

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

Totally -- If what you're mainly doing is sleeping, resting, going to the bathroom (without assistance), and shuffling down the hall and back (without assistance), that's as easy to do at home as it is at the hospital. 

My surgery was scheduled for early in the morning. Not sure if it was the case at the hospital where I had my surgery, but I've worked at hospitals where "check out time" was 11 a.m. and I think this is generally Kaiser's policy. Of course this depended upon when your surgery was. The theory is that everything gets busy later in the day and the ER and OR need to have beds ready for the patients they're admitting. 

Even though I had early morning surgery (and they moved it up a little earlier, too), there wasn't a bed available on the surgical unit for me, so I got to hang out in Recovery until 9 or 10 p.m. I don't remember anything until I got to my room on the unit, and even then not much.  I'm not sure if that contributed to my not being very awake the next day or not. 

Nowadays, lengths of stay are getting shorter and shorter.  Sure, it's in part an economic thing, but also anesthesia is improving so that it doesn't take as long to recover from it, and surgeries are quicker so that less time is spent being "under." That makes for a faster recovery time, too.  Also, we know that the sooner patients get up -- sitting up, walking -- the less complications. 

A friend wrote a nine-day clinical plan of care for a certain surgical procedure back in the '90s that had been modified to a length of stay of five days in 2002. By 2004, the same surgery got folks out the door and headed home after four days (I have no idea what the length of stay is nowadays).

Perhaps one day we'll arrive back home before we even get rolled into the OR suite? THAT will take some doing!

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 3183
Joined: Oct 2011

Great stuff. I use it regularly. I buy it in 5 pound bags. Then I use it for soda blasting (think sandblasting) small parts like carburators, crank cases, and other alloy motorcycle parts. Cleans perfectly and all residue just washes away. Awesome DIY method to restore smaller items. Even plastics clean nicely with no damage. I get a lot of, "No sh!t?" when bikers ask me how I restore pieces so beautifully. In the meantime, I'll stay away from pigeon sh!t. I've had enough cancer.

Retcenturion's picture
Retcenturion
Posts: 240
Joined: Mar 2017

Hey bee...week out and feeling so much better..saw surgeon yesterday had staples taken out which helped a lot in movement. My surgery was delayed by at least hour which put me in my room close to 11pm.first nite was just breathing an Dilaudid for pain second day was bad...no gettng around it...had me out of bed by noon..didn't want to eat anything.was in recliner most of day. Wed.,3rd morning Dr thought I could go home if I wanted...it was my call...I asked to stay another day..he said no problem.I came home thurs morning..Everyone is different but I feel a thousand times better than 1st day...send me any questions you nite have..

 

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