CSN Login
Members Online: 8

You are here

What has cancer taught you about yourself?

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 3183
Joined: Oct 2011

Posts: 2760
Joined: Oct 2011

Jan 02, 2017 - 4:51 pm

I wanted to open up a thought from a recent thread. At least as of today, we all know what NED means. But what else have we all learned? Newbies concerns and fears are different than us old timers. And so are stage 1's vs stage 4's. What about how we plan and cope? Have we learned who we really are?

My career in health care prepared me to accept death. That is so different than my undefeated survival instinct. I'm just not ready to go. Medicine works best if you fight for a good outcome. I've always known that my life long committment to fitness has taught me that I can ALWAYS tolerate just a little more. I also learned from contact sports that I can get knocked down pretty damn hard and I will still get back up to take another hit. That is my responsibility. It has always been and always will be survival of the fittest. I know my resiliency is wearing thin, but it's gotten me this far.

I've also learned that accepting how my life has been altered allows me to readjust my goals and expectations. I sure do miss my Harley but you should see how nice my property looks! I look forward to continue persuing my hobbies and interests throughout 2017. I am proof that we are living with cancer. Not dying from it. (boy, am I looking forward to spring).

Fox Loves You, Fly!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

stub1969's picture
stub1969
Posts: 800
Joined: Jul 2016

I've always known--at least my wife tells me--that I'm pretty stubborn.  I'm a product of my experiences and interests.  I was a multi-sport athlete in high school, but my favorite was wrestling.  I LOVE the sport.  One-on-one to see who trained and worked the hardest.  Any weakness, both mental or physical was taken advantage of by your opponent.  Growing up in a household of three boys, wrestling in high school was just an extension of my childhood.  I still crave competition, which is why I workout and run.  When I found out I had cancer it initially kicked my butt.  I think a big reason it impacted me so dramatically (an still does) was because cancer isn't an opponent I could face eye-to-eye and toe-to-toe.  Cancer really messes with your mind.  I'm glad I'm physically fit, but I'm also glad I've exercised my mental muscles over the years.  On a side note--I've tried to live my life a little differently than pre-diagnosis.  Donna, if you don't mind, I'd love to use your words from a previous post to describe my post-diagnosis mental state for living:

"What have I learned in 10+ years? Have Hope.  Take care of your health (weight, blood pressure, etc.).  Don't sweat the little things.  Say I love You more often. Eliminate tasks-people-meetings where you feel like you are wasting your time, and don't let them guilt you into doing more than you want to do.  Be more selfish with the time you have.  Be generous and be anonymous.  Spend more time with your family and close friends. Laugh. Take time to relax your body and your mind."  

I hope you get as much out of Donna's words as I did when I first read them.  Individually and collectively, these concepts are powerful. 

Blessings,

Stub

Jan4you's picture
Jan4you
Posts: 1322
Joined: Oct 2013

Great post inviting an interesting discussion, Foxy! I just was writing about what the "c" word teaches us? What do we learn about ourselves we didn't know before? Strenghts, weaknesses? How do we cope with fear & anxiety? Our relationships?

How much better we learn to make our health a priority. Seek support and help when needed..

Adversity forces us to grow and expand our viewpoints and priorities I beleive.

And I believe in YOU!!

Hugs, Jan

 

dhs1963's picture
dhs1963
Posts: 510
Joined: May 2012

All my life, my focus was on what was coming:  the next project, the next report, the next trip, the next weekend.  Then, suddenly, there might not be a next. All I knew was how I was at the moment.  The cancer came back once, would it do it again?  Well, what to the odds say?  How can I plan for the future?  Do I have 3 months or 30 years?  Argh!!!  That triggered an identity crisis:  who am I?  why?  Why Me?  Why not me?

Pretty quickly, I came to realize the only planning would be out to the next scan.  So I started living life one scan at a time.  Then, something else happened...my heart stopped.  I was only out for about 30 seconds to a minute, and was revived (was in a medical office).  I realized at that point that I really do not know how much time I have left.  I was about 50.  I also realized, I never knew how much time I had.  I just thought I did.  Instead of being depressing, it was liberating.  It meant that each day should be lived.  Each moment enjoyed.

Today, I will plan out beyond the next scan; I am NED for almost 4 years.  Scans are every six months.  I also see the caridologist every six months, and other doctors.  I am 53 years old.  Will I make 54?  I do not know.   But, I will enjoy the ride.

donna_lee's picture
donna_lee
Posts: 901
Joined: Feb 2009

I wouldn't change anything I've said over the years I've been here, or the quote from Stub.

From just after DX in 2006 until about two years ago, I participated in, and later facilitated (herded cats) a Cancer Support Group on Monday mornings.  As I sat back and observed and listend, I saw a bunch of individuals who, to semi-quote Einstein, "would repeat their behavior and expect a differt answer." 

Whether it was the mother who was clean of drugs and sober now, but must have left her son with a lot of baggage and bad memories.  Her D-i-l didn't want mom in their lives.  Or the guy who kept going back to his estranged wife, thinking she'd quit smoking pot for recreation.  Or the guy who was Dx'd with Adult ADHD who wouldn't take his meds and consumed the group with his talking.  And the former Principal who knew the rules-no politics and no religion- who kept wanting to share His religion with all of us.  This was when I eliminated meetings that became time wasters to me.

As Fox has said, some of us don't have much advice for those who find us the minute they are diagnosed, although we are glad they have found a group to latch on to. I've never had robotic surgery; my Lap surgeries were a tubal ligation and later a Dx-exploratory for Endometriosis, which are totally different from removing all or part of a kidney.  I've never had radiation treatment, or any of the cancer drugs-and I'm truly lucky that what they call Palliative care-Surgery- was able to keep me NED.

It's the beginning of a new year, and where am I going with this.  Maybe even I don't know.  But I did set a goal when my second granddaughter was born in Aug. 2006 that I wanted to be at her wedding, and that whe wasn't allowed to marry until whe was 50.  Hah.  I took the girls shopping last Saturday, and then we went to lunch and visited.  That's what it's all about.  Creating memories for the future.  My youngest grandson is playing in a soccer tourney in a couple of weeks and inviting coaches from a couple of colleges to watch him, in hopes they'll like what they see for their team  He wants to study Engineering and Play Soccer at a small college somewhere in the Pacific Northwest.  Goal Setting!!

Enuff-Have a good year, keep up all the good work, be happy, and smile a lot. Cool

Hugs to all,

donna_lee

Jojo61's picture
Jojo61
Posts: 1310
Joined: Oct 2013

I discovered a lump in my abdomen while at my mother's bedside, the last days of her life (lung cancer). I remember asking my sisters if I should be worried about the lump and get it checked out. They said YES! After my mother passed, we spent the next couple of months clearing her apartment, grieving, adjusting. After I went back to work, it still took a while before I had a chance to call the doctor. My doctor sent me for a CT scan after the ultrasound revealed a "swollen" kidney. Imagine my surprise when I read what was in the envelope I was handed to pass to the technician. ***Patient does not know! If you have any questions please call the office. Large mass on kidney, likely carcinoma." I read it, texted my husband, and he (after quickly googling) texted back saying it should be an okay outcome. I went through the CT scan, joked with the technicians, and went back to work to tell my boss. No tears.

I learned that I was strong....but didn't really learn that until later on during my experience. My sister pointed it out. She reminded me that early on she had asked me why I wasn't really scared. I told her that I knew our mum and dad were watching over me. And I do believe that they were. I also learned how much faith I had.

I learned a lot from this group of wonderful people. I learned facts from them, and learned of their experiences. I learned how compassionate people were. What big, enormous, warm hearts they had. I learned that I wasn't alone. I also learned that I have trouble with medical jargon!! LOL. But others here are super at it!! It all works out.

Health is more of a priority now, but my biggest priority is time. Quality time. I have started to pare away relationships that are time wasters. I am also trying to not be so hard on myself. I am my own worst critic. It is time to embrace the good things and learn to live with the flaws. We all have them - and some of the flaws can even end up being endearing! Who knew?? I am also trying to simplify my life, streamline it, so that I don't waste time on "stuff". It is amazing how much time we use up on "stuff". This year's resolution for me? To not buy anything! (other than food and hygiene products). That frees up time - and money! (of course, it is only January 3rd, but so far, so good! LOL).

Great post, Foxy. I love you for all your insightful comments....you handsome fella!

Hugs

Jojo

 

 

icemantoo's picture
icemantoo
Posts: 3230
Joined: Jan 2010

Never in my wildest dreams did I ever think that I would get Cancer. Being told I had Kidney Cancer after I had a routine CYA CT  made me numb and my wife freaked out. Having gone thru that   makes me able to relate to the Newbies in a more personal and understanding way than many doctors and mental health professionals can. I can also relate to other Cancer patients and understanding what it means to hear that you have Cancer,

 

Icemantoo

APny's picture
APny
Posts: 1949
Joined: Mar 2014

It taught me that I'm not immortal and invincible.  I was never sick in my life besides the occasional cold, and except for a torn meniscus I never had a thing wrong with me in 62 years of life. So I figured nothing will ever go wrong. No one in my family (which is huge) has ever had cancer so that was the last thing I thought I'd get. It also taught me that you can take care of yourself, eat healthy, exercise, not smoke or drink a lot and still get cancer. It also taught me to be humble because others are facing a much more daunting version of this horrible disease. Finally it taught me who my real friends and supporters are.

Footstomper's picture
Footstomper
Posts: 1238
Joined: Dec 2014

1, Cancer is a total tom tit of a disease

2, I've got more bottle than I thought I had

3, Nothing paints a worse picture than your imagination will

4, Love is strong and given freely without hope or thought of recuperation

5, Anyone called Molly is alright by me

mrou50
Posts: 389
Joined: Mar 2013

I was a multi sport athlete who loved and revered competition.  I thought I was the toughest person I knew because of this. I would not back down from any kind of fight, physical or mental.  I always placed family above God and everything else. After being told I had cancer, then being told it returned a year and half later after they got rid of the first time everything changed.  

I found out I was not the toughest person I know, I don't want this battle but it has been placed in front of me. Even though I don't want this I will still fight for my right to be on this earth.   I still love and honor my family but I have learned that God should come first and that actually helped strengthen my feelings about family.  I learned I am a very liberal person and I enjoy life but I am not afraid of death, just how I die frightens me.  I learned that life is to short to pay attention to negative people who only think about themselves.  

I also learned that mankind has an obligation to people to care for them and to make sure they are cared for medically, as well as mentally, and that there are people out there that only care about themselves and don't feel an obligation to others.  I try to be more compasionate towards others. 

Most importantly I love my family friends on a much deeper level then ever before, and to my male friends who I always was macho around I tell them when ever I see them or talk to them I love them and that they are important to me.  It usually catches them off guard but every last one of them have said I love you back.

Mark

hardo718's picture
hardo718
Posts: 853
Joined: Jan 2016

Honestly, I had to contemplate a bit.  Not that I don't know what it has taught me about me, but rather, how to put it in words.

I take less for granted now. 

I show up more......I used to think about invitations too much, now if I'm available, I go and I try to enjoy. Never felt comfortable socializing before.  I had 80% hearing loss as a child and although my hearing was restored I still have issues in group settings.  When there are multiple conversations going on, my brain is trying to hear all of them!  Talk about sensory overload.  haha

I cherish family & friends more.

I am less judgemental now and realize I am no better than anyone, I am no worse than anyone, just different.

I know more than ever, that my time on this planet is a lesson of sorts and that I can be an educator as well as a student because of my experiences.  My lesson today I learned from what Mark (mrou50) wrote above about expressing love....I need to do more of that.  Thanx Mark!

I am stronger than I thought I was.

I don't get as flustered over the stuff that doesn't really matter in the long run.....usually.  Wink

I focus more on the positive things around me than the negatives.

I'm all about celebrating life since that dirty little beast, Bob the Blob, stopped by and overstayed his welcome.  Tongue Out

Donna~

 

 

 

 

Dave418's picture
Dave418
Posts: 95
Joined: Aug 2014

I am strong.

I am a fighter

Even if i'm NED ,Cancer will always be there, that song is stuck in my head...

I have a lot of friends and a wondurful family.

People care about me.

Lets do it today, we'll sleep when dead

I am really stubborn

Only people who have or had cancer will really understand.

Others experiences are really helping me.

I'll never go back to the "old" normal, i am a changed men.

Beeing alive is good, live it fullspeed.

My friends joke about my "monokidney" and i like it. 

This group is a blessing.

Pizza and beer!! ;-)

Dave

 

 

 

 

 

danbren2's picture
danbren2
Posts: 311
Joined: May 2013

The words "don't sweat the small stuff" took on a whole new meaning! I had no idea what I was up against.  It was bad enough being told I have cancer, but stage 4, after looking on the computer I thought I was dead.  I have learned to look at life in general differently and have realized getting mad does not change anything except to cause stress, which is really just as evil as the cancer!

I have found that I am a lot stronger than I thought and can overcome so many things by just believing in myself and doing what is best for me!  I was approved for disability and will be retiring on January 20.  Last  MRI showed another tumor in brain (total of 5 now in there) but the first three that had cyber knife treatment are shrinking!

                              Love and prayers for good health!

                              Brenda

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Since it's only been 4 months since my original diagnosis I've learned I've got a lot to learn, but I've also learned one can learn a lot in a short time. Oddly, one thing that stands out to me is I've learned to worry less about what others think. If my hair is out of place or I had a stain on my pants, I used to worry about that - now, I don't care! I guess I'm learning not to sweat the small things. One thing I've definitely learned is how caring and loving people are, and that truly is a gift I don't think many people get to experience. Thanks Fox for starting this thread because I'm learning just reading through it!

Kevin 

pamstayner's picture
pamstayner
Posts: 111
Joined: Apr 2014

That I am just fine where I am right now.  I am strong and can take whatever might be thrown at me with this cancer. I am not afraid, and I am still ME. I can do more than I thought I could, and if I cannot, then let it go... or ask for help. It simply is not important any more  . I enjoy every day, set a goal of what I want to do, one day at a time. I usually make it.  

I gain strength from those of you who post here.  I make sure to read here and SP each few days... because you are all important to me. 

Ok Fox.. you have me wallowing in all this heavy heavy life stuff... time for me to just go out and FLY !! ( By the way, when I dream, I can fly, about anytime I think of wanting to... loose my stomach and all... not a lot of people can fly in their sleep... I do.)

    Pam

 

 

Allochka's picture
Allochka
Posts: 874
Joined: Nov 2014

Thank you for this great topic and wonderful, sincere answers. Recently I realized that, in addition to to learning about strength, love, compassion and other major things I have learned how quickly we forget...

When my husband was diagnosed and treated, I also realized what is really important in life and decided not to sweat the small stuff. Well... 3-4 months passed after husband diagnosis and I was trrribly upset that the color of skirting boards in our renovated apartment was slightly different from floor hardwood color. And more stuff like that... 

How stupid is this? The man I loved just had potentially deadly disease, I was sure I knew what was important then. 3 months later -  here we go again... Was also upset recently of not getting salary increase to desired level (increase - yes, but not ENOUGH, give me more!)

That is what I've learned. We forget, we still take for granted, and sometimes even one serious blow is not enough to reevaluate. I was a bit ashamed of myself and try to make conscious effort not to fall into this trap again.

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

Allochka --

I also had to deal with skirting boards, carpeting, and such recently.  We had damage to our house, and the contractor told me they couldn't find an exact match to the floor, but were looking. I was exasperated as well, but in the other direction. "Something in the general neighborhood of the floor is fine!" Of course they wanted to do their best, which took longer. Then came time to replace the carpeting.  I was presented with more than a dozen choices, any of which would've been OK.  "I don't care, whatever you can get!" Family and friends freaked in the other direction. "Don't EVER tell a contractor you don't care! You could get anything!" OK, I picked something nice.  It's all good. 

But at the time, it didn't make any difference to me.  I had bigger concerns. My life was chaotic and I was looking forward to getting rid of a little bit of the chaos.  I could have as easily responded to the chaos by figuring my life was out of control and I wanted something I could control so OF COURSE the baseboards had better match and the carpet had better be perfect. 

It's just part of being human. Cancer teaches us we are still human beings, even if some times we forget what's important or take things for granted. 

marosa's picture
marosa
Posts: 332
Joined: Feb 2015

Just have not been able to quite put together in my mind, much less in words the things wich I have learned...   I'll just try a few!  One is that its not only "other people" who get cancer, I never thought I !!!   I now feel much more free about many things like saying "no", like not wasting time on things or people that I don't enjoy or feel confortable with,  I do less "guilt trips" on myself and I have learned that even hypocondriacs like me can be strong and cope with fear and anxiety when faced with them just as others do.

Understanding that this desease makes people feel scared and sometimes don't really know how to go about us. It used to upset me, now I can deal with it without getting all fussed up.  I have always felt there are more good people out there than what we think but Its been such a great experience to see how caring and giving so many are, even people who have never met you personally, like all of you here.

Another surprising thing for me is to see how everything changes but at the same time everything stays more or less the same.  I think I was sure after surviving cancer I would turn into some kind of Angel... but no, I'm still impatient, still afraid of planes (but love traveling), still grouchy in the mornings,  still give hell to my husband for forgetting everyday to brush also the back of his hair!  Oh Im far from having turned into no angel!

mrou50
Posts: 389
Joined: Mar 2013

It's great that you still give "hell" to your husband anything else would make him feel uncomfortable.  I know when I was diagnosed the second time my wife changed a little, she stopped lecturing me when I did stupid things, and expected me to stop opening doors for her for fear that I would get hurt and many other things.  I told her that I need her to be her and treat me just the same as she did before. That i why I think it is great that you are being you that is awesome.

 Mark

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

The biggest thing that's struck me is the "what if," as in "What if this -- how things are going RIGHT NOW -- is as good as it's ever going to get?" What then? It puts a bit more responsibility on me and my attitude.  Also, in this LIVING with cancer thing (Thanks, Fox), I realized that -- OOPS! -- I'm not necessarily focusing on the Living. When you get on the cancer train it's way to easy to start making life a journey that's just a series of station stops that involve scans, surgery, etc which is no way to live, either.   

I try not to freak about things, which is good. On the other hand, my reactions tend to be in the other direction of not stressing.  Consequently, there's a lot of things I just let slide, and that's on a good day. I'm realizing that it's probably a really sensible idea to pick up the slack where some of those things have slid.  So I've been thinking, What it is that I would really like to be doing, realizing that this may BE as good as it gets, energy-wise? If I'm going to be doing something productive, what is that going to be? If I'm going to be kicking back, chilling, what does that look like?  

I am NOT picking up one of the many books or lists that tout "1000 Places to Go Before You Die" or "500 Things to Do Before You Die," which have always struck me as kind of stupid. I mean, when else do you get to enjoy any place or anything if it's not before you die? My weird sense of humor is really one of my best friends and I especially appreciate that since I've been on this latest learning gig. 

Thanks for the writing -- and thinking -- prompt!

Jerzy

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 3183
Joined: Oct 2011

I carefully read that list. But I think it was all wrong. I would think that yelling for help would have been the most common thing but it wasn't even mentioned.

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

Not to mention, "Dial 911," "Read the instructions," and "Call before you dig" are most likely jockeying for position in 2nd through 5th place. 

Bay Area Guy's picture
Bay Area Guy
Posts: 385
Joined: Jun 2016

Cancer was not my first big health issue.  In early 2004 and again in 2010, I had abdominal issues that, if I hadn't gotten to the hospital in a timely manner, could have killed me.  In both instances, a part of intestines either flipped over another part or twisted in such a way that my intestines were completely blocked.  Without fairly immediate attention, such problems can be fatal.

In 2004, I had been married for 25 years.  I have always loved my wife deeply, but in many ways, we both found that, to a degree, we had both been kind of taking each other for granted.  My surgeries and the recuperation I had to go through in 2010, showed both of us just how much we need each other and our love, already very deep, grew even deeper.

What the cancer specifically taught both of us was how much we had taken family for granted.  My mom died in 2010 about a month after I had finally recovered from that surgery (yeah, 2010 really sucked as a year) and my dad died a year later.  My only sister lives in Florida and my family wasn't really all that close to my aunts and uncles or cousins.  When I was diagnosed in late 2013, my sister was very helpful in calming me down (she's a nurse practitioner) regarding what kideny cancer is and what the treatment is.  But she couldn't come out for the surgery when I had it in 2016.  However, my wife's family really came through for us.  I was very nervous about my wife having to be alone while I was in the OR.  But one of her brothers, along with his girlfriend (who happens to be an RN in training) along with one of her nieces, stayed with her the entire time.  In fact, the first thing I heard when I was back in my room and being woken up was my niece's voice.  The next day, when I was released, another brother and a second niece came down to pick us up and make sure we had everything we needed at home.  My wife has a large family (8 brothers and sisters) and we've always been kind of the "go to" people whenever issues have come up with any of them, and in a family of nine, issues ALWAYS come up.  So we learned that we can count on family every bit as much as they have come to count on us.

I have my first follow-up CT scan on Monday and my appointment with the urological surgeon is a week from Tuesday.  I already had my chest x-ray and it came back perfectly clean.  I see no reason why the CT isn't going to come back just as clean.  I'll be letting everyone know the results when I get them.

rwmiller56's picture
rwmiller56
Posts: 40
Joined: Nov 2016

I've stressed over a lot of things in my life, and kidney cancer was no exception. The initial diagnosis was certainly a shocker. The 7 cm clear cell tumor was detected by CT scan when I was in the hospital for a mini-stroke (TIA). After the full nephrectomy, I thought I had it beat. After all, they gave me an 80% chance that there would be no recurrence. Good odds, I thought, no sweat. I'll never forget the sinking feeling I felt 4 months later, sitting in my hotel room in Salt Lake City while on a business trip, and reading the imaging report..."lytic lesion, 1.5 cm in inferior renal pelvic bone, consistent with metastatic disease...". I was a complete basket case for the remainder of the trip. I thought for sure that I would die soon. I went through several weeks of complete depression and self-pity.

Well, what I have learned since then is, as foxhd so eloquently said, "we are living with cancer, not dying from it." I learned to close that door, and move on. I've learned to be grateful for the positives, as small as they may seem: The tumor was detected early enough that it was still isolated in the kidney. Yes, I have a met, but it is small and there is only one. Tomorrow may bring different news, but I will take it one day at a time, and stay focused on the positive. I have a great team of doctors at Stanford, a great support group of cancer survivors, and above all a loving wife who is helping me so much through all the hurdles and giving me the inspiration and strength to move on. With all this help, I've made positive changes in my life, such as quitting smoking (immediately after the stroke!), eating a healthier diet, and working on strengthening my immune system. Most importantly, I've learned that keeping a positive outlook is key.

Wishing everyone all the best in their treatment and outcomes. Thank you again for all the support.

Roger

Steve.Adam's picture
Steve.Adam
Posts: 460
Joined: Oct 2016

I have no idea what life is for and I never did know.  But I do like being alive.

I am not working at the moment and not looking for work.  I am waiting until I have recovered from surgery.  I have a lot of time which I spend reading and walking.  I live in a rural area so there are lots of nice views and sometimes the local wildlife hops away when it hears me coming.

A common experience for me lately is to be walking along completely absorbed in my own thoughts then suddenly I will stop walking, stop thinking, and just look around.  It is almost a shock to the system to experience my surroundings directly.  It makes me feel more connected ... more real.

The discovery of my kidney tumour and its implications enhances this feeling.  It makes me feel more alive.

How's that for one of life's nicer ironies?

Steve.

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 3183
Joined: Oct 2011

most of you know by now that I look at alot of topics related to our cancer, but not so much about cancer itself. As I approach 6 years post op, I have to admit that I have been through the ringer.  I have defied the odds against me. No longer a bad a$$ biker. Or a 200# weight lifting marathoner. I am a 142# survivor. I have functional use of my hands but neuropathies and damage to my nervous system are a challenge. Every day I get up wondering if I can accomplish anything that day. Often the answer is no. I cut myself  slack but it disappoints me to no end. I have had to concede so much to this damn disease. How much more can I handle? A day later I'm stacking firewood, playing music, and puttering in my garage. I'm excited about golf this spring. I so much want to get my old VW camper and vintage motorcycles on the road. So much to do. So little time. Maybe,maybe not.

I have  my blood work and scan results. Metabolic panel, cbc, thyroid,lactate dehydrogenase, etc. ALL WITHIN NORMS!!!.....WHAT???

CT scan says, chest, abdomen and pelvis are pretty clear. The couple mets present are smaller......WHAT???

MRI's show my spine, rib and shoulder mets are stable....WHAT???

 ..........just got a phone call. I'm getting my cabo for free again this year!!!!      LIFE IS GOOD!!

Karma and positive thinkng. FLY. We do this together. I want to thank everyone. I need to thank my closest friends who have been here the whole trip. Keep your arms and legs inside the bus, buckle up, and hold on. This ride isn't slowing down yet.

Jan4you's picture
Jan4you
Posts: 1322
Joined: Oct 2013

BLESSED...and well deserved, Foxy!!

Hugs, Jan

JerzyGrrl's picture
JerzyGrrl
Posts: 760
Joined: Jun 2016

Looks as though YOU are all buckled up and holding on, too --

Here we goooooooooooooo -- !

Footstomper's picture
Footstomper
Posts: 1238
Joined: Dec 2014

Keep that good news a-coming

mrou50
Posts: 389
Joined: Mar 2013

That is great news on the mets and the free CABO, you scan gives me hope when I go in next month.

Mark

APny's picture
APny
Posts: 1949
Joined: Mar 2014

Fox, those are great news, indeed. Karma at its best :)

hardo718's picture
hardo718
Posts: 853
Joined: Jan 2016

Not really as surprised as you are.  Based on the little I know about you, you seem full of piss & vinegar (in a good way) and I'm not quite sure cancer knew what it was coming up against.  Good for you!!

Here's hoping you are able to do the things you love, very soon.  You're truly an inspiration.  Cool

Donna~

marosa's picture
marosa
Posts: 332
Joined: Feb 2015

You are always a source of inspiration.  FLY Fox! So happy for you!  

Subscribe to Comments for "What has cancer taught you about yourself?"