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So f'ing close

Kelleb
Posts: 20
Joined: Apr 2015

I am so f'ing close to 5 years. Seriously, weeks.

2 weeks ago went to colorectal spec, yep definitely an anal tumor. I had one (mailignant) removed with clear margins in 2 surgeries 5 years ago.

So a week ago I underwent a colonoscopy...2 (tubular)polyps-benign-and the tumor(cancerous). The polyps were removed in the colonoscopy, tumor in surgery.

Today I am seeing an oncologist and am feeling a bit sick to my stomach.

Anyone like to suggest what might happen? Do we think with a recurring tumor I am looking at chemoradiation?

Thanks y'all.

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mp327
Posts: 4239
Joined: Jan 2010

Welcome here, but I am sorry to hear of your recurrence.  How unfortunate that you've had this roadblock thrown in your way so close to the 5-year mark.  If you did not previously have chemoradiation, I would say there's a good chance that your treatment plan will be just that--probably about 6 weeks worth.  I hope today's appt. goes well and that the oncologist has a plan in mind for getting rid of this tumor.  Please let us know what will happen next.

Martha

eihtak
Posts: 1303
Joined: Oct 2011

Hi, and unfortunately welcome! While I can not relate entirely to your situation I have a similar one. I was 4yrs NED when my follow-up scan revealed a large mass on my lung. Since not in the original site this is considered mets./stage4. I had no symptoms and other than mild but normal anxiety had expected a clear report.

My mass was removed surgically (entire lower left lung node) but I am following up with a series of chemo. The drugs I am on are cisplatin/5FU.  (see my post about recurrance treatment update)

My guess would be that your treatment may be similar and don't think they will see radiation to the same site as initially to be beneficial, but I am no doctor and they all have individual preferences.

For the record, chemo is not fun, but easier without the radiation effects to deal with too.

The mind game this disease plays on us is sometimes the worst part of the deal, and I can relate to the shock you must have felt to receive this news. Please keep us posted and know that you are not in this alone!

katheryn

Kelleb
Posts: 20
Joined: Apr 2015

yep. Doing the protocol chemoradiation. I'm having a CT scan early next week & then onto the other ASAP. I'm a little weepy.

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mp327
Posts: 4239
Joined: Jan 2010

I'm glad you and your doctors are moving right along to get your treatment started.  I can understand your weepiness.  This is not an easy treatment, but like so many of us here, you will get through it.  Please let us know what your CT scan shows and when you'll start treatment.  I wish you all the very best.

Martha

eihtak
Posts: 1303
Joined: Oct 2011

Hi, I just realized you did not have radiation after your surgery 5 yrs ago (correct me if I'm wrong)....so, the protocal treatment plan makes perfect sense.

Your feeling weepy is normal, but now you have a plan and can move forward. I will keep you in my thoughts for more answers following your scan. I remember when I began chemo/rad and my sister kept telling me to just focus on something a few months down the road when treatment would be over. Although this is a tough one, it is short in comparison to many others and you will get through it with shining colors!

We are here for you....

katheryn

Kelleb
Posts: 20
Joined: Apr 2015

Thanks for the kind words, ladies. It IS good to know that someone understands. I am wrapping my head around the treatment and am bolstered by the facts showing how well it works.

I am unsettled by the radiation side effects and really angry about this "low residue" diet. I have spent so long eating really good, organic, non-processed, fresh food that the idea of this diet really hurts. But, I suppose one could argue that all that clean eating did not protect me from cancer...

Thanks for letting me whine a little.

Kelle

jcruz
Posts: 379
Joined: Jan 2013

I wasn't advised to eat a low residue diet.  I think I got a list of foods you might want to stay away from and the advice that I follow the BRAT diet when the diarrhea got bad.  I'm with you on being disturbed by the idea of changing from our healthy-eating diet to the plain stuff.  I was a huge veg and whole grains eater prior to treatment and I was careful never to overcook the veg.  For a good long time after treatment I ate white rice and pureed veg and always thought "I'm not supposed to eat this way".  During treatment I ate whatever appealed to me which wasn't much.  I made smoothies with whey protein, full-fat greek yogurt and frozen fruit.  I loved mango sorbet and plain sourdough toast.  I just want you to know that in time you will be able to re-introduce the food you eat now.  It's a trial and error thing and it takes time.

Whining totally allowed!

Janet

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 4239
Joined: Jan 2010

I originally posted this on the other thread, but copied it here.

I was not advised by any of my doctors to follow a low-residue diet while undergoing treatment.  However, I wish I had, as it probably would have cut down on my overactive bowel issues, which were horrible.  I probably had 20 BM's per day and uncontrollable diarrhea. 

My experience with low-residue came in January 2013, when I was hospitalized for a partial small bowel obstruction, thought to be as a result of the radiation I received in 2008 as part of my treatment for the anal cancer.  Adhesions can form after radiation and sometimes cause blockages.  At the time of my discharge from the hospital, I was advised to follow a low-residue diet for at least 2 weeks, which I did.  This allows the bowels to "rest."  It really does cut down on the amount of stool output, which would be a definite plus while getting radiation, IMO.

You sound like a very health-conscious individual, which is great.  I am too (most of the time!).  However, when I went through treatment, I lost significant weight and got down to 92 pounds.  A lot of foods did not taste good to me and the result was weight loss.  All of the diarrhea didn't help either.  My oncologist threatened to put me in the hospital for nutrition if I didn't maintain my weight.  His advice to me at that time was to eat whatever tasted good, whether it was healthy or not.  That was hard for me to hear, but I had to start doing that and found towards the end of my treatment about the only thing that tasted good to me was Ramen noodles or canned soup, which is something I would NEVER eat under normal circumstances.  However, I was able to maintain my weight and keep myself out of the hospital. 

If your appetite tanks like mine did and that of so many others who go through this treatment, I would give you the same advice if weight loss is a serious issue.  In my case, I was a lightweight to begin with and could not afford to lose anymore weight because of the treatment.  You may find that foods that you love will not taste good during treatment.  Fruits and veggies might go through you like a bullet train, which was the case for me.  Supplement drinks, such as Boost and Ensure, can be helpful in getting your body some of the nutrition it needs during this time if foods are not providing enough.  Protein is key for healing, and these drinks provide a good source of that.

Once you have treatment behind you, then you can get back to healthy eating if you are not able to maintain that type of diet during treatment.  This is only for a short time.  Just do what you have to do to get through it.

Martha 

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