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To chemo or not to chemo, that is the queston

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Comments

  • daisy366
    daisy366 Member Posts: 1,458
    marti968 said:

    Hysterectomy

     How bad was the recuperation.  Is there much pain?  Is there some way to do a private post?  If not please E-Mail me so I can ask you a couple of questions about your surgery.  I have never scrubbed for this type of surgery with the three doctors I scrubbed with.  Oh sorry that just means I worked with in surgery.  In the day we called it “scrubbed”.  I do know that the doctor is going to use the DaVinci Robot to make 5 holes.  No experience with the DaVinci Robot either.  Supposed to make the surgery easier on the patient. [email protected]

    Marti

    Did you. Discuss pros axons of robotic? One is they do not have as good look inside as with open. If body can tolerate I think open is way to go. Just my opinion and what I've gleaned from others.

    best wishes. mary ann

  • Debz
    Debz Member Posts: 6
    daisy366 said:

    Marti

    Did you. Discuss pros axons of robotic? One is they do not have as good look inside as with open. If body can tolerate I think open is way to go. Just my opinion and what I've gleaned from others.

    best wishes. mary ann

    robotic surgery

    Hello all

    With all due respect I must comment on a falsehood that has been repeated many times on this site. Robotic surgery has an enhanced visualization and the surgeon can see things otherwise hidden or too small to see with normal eyesight. With robotic surgery the surgeon views a magnified, high resolution 3D image of the surgical site. With robotic surgery there is a shorter hospital stay, less blood loss, less pain, less scarring, less risk of infection and a faster recovery.

    I had da Vinci robotic surgery for Stage 2, Grade 2 endometrial cancer. I did alot of research on the surgery and was convinced this was the way to go. At the end of this month I will be 3 years NED.

    When I went for a second opinion on the same day I went for a first visit with the surgeon who did my robotic surgery, the second opinion doctor said that my uterus was too enlarged for robotic surgery and she would have to do open surgery. Earlier that day the surgeon who actually did the surgery said that my uterus was a little bit enlarged but she would have no problem doing the robotic surgery. What the second doctor never told me and that I found out later was that she was not qualified to do robotic surgery. That surgeon totally mislead me and this was at a major New York City hospital. 

    Maybe all the misinformation is in fact disseminated by doctors who are not qualified to do this type of surgery or belong to hospitals that do not own the robotic surgery system.

    I have lurked on this site for a few years now and I want everyone here to know how impressed I am with how helpful you all are to others in their time of need. 

    Healthy wishes - Deb

     

  • susangr
    susangr Member Posts: 64
    Debz said:

    robotic surgery

    Hello all

    With all due respect I must comment on a falsehood that has been repeated many times on this site. Robotic surgery has an enhanced visualization and the surgeon can see things otherwise hidden or too small to see with normal eyesight. With robotic surgery the surgeon views a magnified, high resolution 3D image of the surgical site. With robotic surgery there is a shorter hospital stay, less blood loss, less pain, less scarring, less risk of infection and a faster recovery.

    I had da Vinci robotic surgery for Stage 2, Grade 2 endometrial cancer. I did alot of research on the surgery and was convinced this was the way to go. At the end of this month I will be 3 years NED.

    When I went for a second opinion on the same day I went for a first visit with the surgeon who did my robotic surgery, the second opinion doctor said that my uterus was too enlarged for robotic surgery and she would have to do open surgery. Earlier that day the surgeon who actually did the surgery said that my uterus was a little bit enlarged but she would have no problem doing the robotic surgery. What the second doctor never told me and that I found out later was that she was not qualified to do robotic surgery. That surgeon totally mislead me and this was at a major New York City hospital. 

    Maybe all the misinformation is in fact disseminated by doctors who are not qualified to do this type of surgery or belong to hospitals that do not own the robotic surgery system.

    I have lurked on this site for a few years now and I want everyone here to know how impressed I am with how helpful you all are to others in their time of need. 

    Healthy wishes - Deb

     

    Robotic Approach

    I support everything Deb says about this approach. I had 6 hrs of surgery and was out of the hospital within 24 hrs. Recovery was non eventful and allowed me to start chemo/ radiation treatments within 5 weeks.  Optimal time I have been told is within 5-6 weeks. The other thing about thiis surgical approach is that there is less bleeding so visualization is much better.  Since the procedure is still relatively new it would be prudent to ask the surgeon about their expertise and the facilities experience. Sincerely Susan

  • laura25
    laura25 Member Posts: 178
    Debz said:

    robotic surgery

    Hello all

    With all due respect I must comment on a falsehood that has been repeated many times on this site. Robotic surgery has an enhanced visualization and the surgeon can see things otherwise hidden or too small to see with normal eyesight. With robotic surgery the surgeon views a magnified, high resolution 3D image of the surgical site. With robotic surgery there is a shorter hospital stay, less blood loss, less pain, less scarring, less risk of infection and a faster recovery.

    I had da Vinci robotic surgery for Stage 2, Grade 2 endometrial cancer. I did alot of research on the surgery and was convinced this was the way to go. At the end of this month I will be 3 years NED.

    When I went for a second opinion on the same day I went for a first visit with the surgeon who did my robotic surgery, the second opinion doctor said that my uterus was too enlarged for robotic surgery and she would have to do open surgery. Earlier that day the surgeon who actually did the surgery said that my uterus was a little bit enlarged but she would have no problem doing the robotic surgery. What the second doctor never told me and that I found out later was that she was not qualified to do robotic surgery. That surgeon totally mislead me and this was at a major New York City hospital. 

    Maybe all the misinformation is in fact disseminated by doctors who are not qualified to do this type of surgery or belong to hospitals that do not own the robotic surgery system.

    I have lurked on this site for a few years now and I want everyone here to know how impressed I am with how helpful you all are to others in their time of need. 

    Healthy wishes - Deb

     

    Agree for most part

    Hi Deb... I totally agree that robotic is the way to go if you can.   Less time recovering, less chance for infection and less hospital stay.  But for me I had to have an open surgery. 

    My doctor does both robotic and open....  my cancer was found after robotic was done for a partial hysterectomy.  He said altough robotic does  have enhanced visualization, it does not see what is "lurking" around the corner.  He was adamant  that my case should be open  because it would grant him the ability to feel and  move things around while the robotic would not.   

    In my case I was stage 3C grade 3 and dx at age 45.  I'm now almost 2 1/2 years out since dx and almost 2 years since stopping chemo.  I believe in my case open was the way to go. 

    Its terrible that you had a Dr say no to robotics because she wasn't certified in it.  That is just shameful.  I love this board, we are all in this together and the information given is so valuable.

     

     

  • txtrisha55
    txtrisha55 Member Posts: 693
    laura25 said:

    Agree for most part

    Hi Deb... I totally agree that robotic is the way to go if you can.   Less time recovering, less chance for infection and less hospital stay.  But for me I had to have an open surgery. 

    My doctor does both robotic and open....  my cancer was found after robotic was done for a partial hysterectomy.  He said altough robotic does  have enhanced visualization, it does not see what is "lurking" around the corner.  He was adamant  that my case should be open  because it would grant him the ability to feel and  move things around while the robotic would not.   

    In my case I was stage 3C grade 3 and dx at age 45.  I'm now almost 2 1/2 years out since dx and almost 2 years since stopping chemo.  I believe in my case open was the way to go. 

    Its terrible that you had a Dr say no to robotics because she wasn't certified in it.  That is just shameful.  I love this board, we are all in this together and the information given is so valuable.

     

     

    Sometimes open is the best.

    I went to a Gyn Onc Dr at a NCI recognized hospital.  She does both robotics and open.  She chooses open for the same reason you said Laura, to get in there are really look around.  That is why after surgery, she told my waiting family and friends that it looked to be contained to just the uterus but patholgy would have to come.  Turns out Grade 3 MMMT, Stage 3c1 because there were two microscopic cells in 1 lymph node.  Dr. also said that she only wanted to give me chemo, carbo/taxol and no radiation because with everything removed there was nothing left they could pinpoint to radiate.  Had surgery 8 April 11 and started chemo treatment 6 May 11. There was only a 4 week period between surgery and 1 st chemo.  I had six treatments till the last one on 22 Aug 11. 

    I was not given a choice of the robotic but have heard that it is a good way to go for some but sometimes even with robotics they have to go back in with open.  Cancer comes in all shapes and forms and no one way is the best way to do surgery or do treatment.  Everyone is different, cancer is different but the journey and feelings we women go through are pretty much the same.  That is why this board is so great because we all can relate to someones feelings.  Best to all. trish

  • Double Whammy
    Double Whammy Member Posts: 2,832

    Sometimes open is the best.

    I went to a Gyn Onc Dr at a NCI recognized hospital.  She does both robotics and open.  She chooses open for the same reason you said Laura, to get in there are really look around.  That is why after surgery, she told my waiting family and friends that it looked to be contained to just the uterus but patholgy would have to come.  Turns out Grade 3 MMMT, Stage 3c1 because there were two microscopic cells in 1 lymph node.  Dr. also said that she only wanted to give me chemo, carbo/taxol and no radiation because with everything removed there was nothing left they could pinpoint to radiate.  Had surgery 8 April 11 and started chemo treatment 6 May 11. There was only a 4 week period between surgery and 1 st chemo.  I had six treatments till the last one on 22 Aug 11. 

    I was not given a choice of the robotic but have heard that it is a good way to go for some but sometimes even with robotics they have to go back in with open.  Cancer comes in all shapes and forms and no one way is the best way to do surgery or do treatment.  Everyone is different, cancer is different but the journey and feelings we women go through are pretty much the same.  That is why this board is so great because we all can relate to someones feelings.  Best to all. trish

    I had robotic

    And am comfortable that my surgeon was skilled in the process.  That being said, I see there's a class action suit underway for women who have been "damaged" by robotic surgery.  I think the issue is some surgeons do not have appropriate skills to use it and are more likely to nick bowels, cause nerve damage, etc.   How do you know if you're in good hands?  Experoemce I guess.  Mine had lots but I was too stupid at the time to even consider this might be an issue.  My gyn onc did tell me that he has had to revert to open on 4 occasions because he could not access some areas for whatever reason and that his goal for me was to give me the "best cancer surgery" that I needed no matter how he had to do it.   I put my trust in my gyn oncs skills and experience and it all turned out fine for me.  I had pelvic lymph nodes removed, but not aortic.   I don't know why that decision was made but  my cancer was the garden variety type, endometriod adenocarcinoma Stage 1a, Grade 1.  I don't know if a more aggressive cancer had been suspected or if the grade and stage had appeared to be higher if the type of surgery would have been different or not.  Maybe. 

    My recovery was phenomenal.  I also had breast cancer and was worried about delaying chemo for the breast cancer too long (the hysterectomy got in the way) so having a shorter recovery was high on my list of priorities.  I  believe the process was entirely appropriate for me with my diagnosis and in the hands of my gyn oncologsit.

    Suzanne

  • fanniemay
    fanniemay Member Posts: 53
    deblola52 said:

    chemotherapy 'yes or no'

    For anyone undecided about going further down the conventional medical route, look at Phillip Day's website 'Credence.com'

    I already have some of his books and attended a one day course yesterday, I already had serious concerns about cancer treatment in this country and have spent some time with the Gerson support group in London.

    Yesterday totally convinced me that diet is the answer to cancer and other diseases, something the medical profession will not admit. It is for everyone to decide, the problem with chemo is it weakens your immune system and that is required to restore your health.

    I am in the medical profession and have been looking into this for years, it is an area that really interests me and I have sadly seen relatives die after going down the conventional route but I have friends who have had chemo and radio and appear fine although still abnormally tired 5 years after their treatment.

    Phillip Day has several DVDs, a good start is 'Healing Cancer from the Inside Out'.

    I have just seen your post about your faith in God, amazing, I believe the Lord Jesus is the only true healer, may God bless you.

    Hi deblola52

    a year and a half since my surgery and I still get tired a lot.  After doing 15 minutes of manual work(like cleaning or gardening) I am so tired and need to rest.  So pleased to see that you believe Jesus heals.  I totally believe I would not be here if it had not been for my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  I started a group on Facebook called, "Christian women living with Cancer"  We encourage each other through scripture and faith building.  Please recommend my site to whomever you think can benefit. Thanks &  God Bless

  • Kathy G.
    Kathy G. Member Posts: 235 **
    Hi everyone!
    I had the

    Hi everyone!

    I had the DaVinci robotic surgery and although my doctor does not give me the warm fuzzies he has done loads of these surgeries and was 100% accurate in his pre-diagnosis of Stage 1/Grade 1 uterine cancer.

    The only thing that concerned me was that he reported my uterus was larger than expected and he had to be extremely careful bringing it out the vaginal canal. I asked if any cells could have 'spilled' into my vagina during this process and he said he sincerely doubted it due to the way he got it out.

    Like Suzanne, my recovery was pretty much uneventful except ofr a difficult UTI 3 days out. But that was attributed to the catheter and 'bumping up against other organs' during the surgery.

    I would hope I am not beint naive or too trusting of the medical community because I've seen and heard alot of horror stories and have definitely learned we need to be our own advocates. But surgeons are using laprosotic surgeries for a variety of conditions including other forms of cancer. IF the surgeon is skilled in doing these surgeries I would hope if they ran into a problem they would rever to open surgery. However, would this have been approved if you could not accomplish the same examination necessary while in there as you can with open surgery

     

  • sunflash
    sunflash Member Posts: 197
    Kathy G. said:

    Hi everyone!
    I had the

    Hi everyone!

    I had the DaVinci robotic surgery and although my doctor does not give me the warm fuzzies he has done loads of these surgeries and was 100% accurate in his pre-diagnosis of Stage 1/Grade 1 uterine cancer.

    The only thing that concerned me was that he reported my uterus was larger than expected and he had to be extremely careful bringing it out the vaginal canal. I asked if any cells could have 'spilled' into my vagina during this process and he said he sincerely doubted it due to the way he got it out.

    Like Suzanne, my recovery was pretty much uneventful except ofr a difficult UTI 3 days out. But that was attributed to the catheter and 'bumping up against other organs' during the surgery.

    I would hope I am not beint naive or too trusting of the medical community because I've seen and heard alot of horror stories and have definitely learned we need to be our own advocates. But surgeons are using laprosotic surgeries for a variety of conditions including other forms of cancer. IF the surgeon is skilled in doing these surgeries I would hope if they ran into a problem they would rever to open surgery. However, would this have been approved if you could not accomplish the same examination necessary while in there as you can with open surgery

     

    I too had robotic Davinci

    I too had robotic Davinci surgery. I asked my gyn/onc about the effectiveness of this surgery versus open abdominal. She told me that the success of the surgery depended on having a surgeon who could do this WELL. She had performed many robotic surgeries and told me mine was a piece of cake even though I'd had prior radiation which could have made this tricky.

    My recovery was amazingly fast, and I have three barely visible scars on my abdomen which look like small scratches. It amazes me how far we've come as far as surgery........now let's just figure out a cure for cancer and we'll be good to go!

     

    Hugs to all!

  • Ocalagal99
    Ocalagal99 Member Posts: 29
    beila said:

    love your cap, nancibee
    I want that cap!!
    What is TLC?
    Love your upbeat attitude
    HOW DO YOU DO A 13 MILE HIKE??????

    I will be starting Doxil and, hopefully Avastin, but still have post chemo fatigue 2 months after my Taxol/Carboplatin, which, unfortunately did not work
    The fatigue is slowly improving, and when I get in a pool, I can still swim my half mile

    Are you in northern California?
    I used to live in San Francisco, and of course loved Yosemite, but couldnt hike 13 miles at the best of times!!

    Keep up the good work!

    hope to hear from you, nancibee,

    Beila

    TLC - Resource

    Hi, Bella, just in case no one has answered your question about TLC - here is the info:
    http://www.tlcdirect.org

    It is a catalogue put out by The American Cancer Society for hats, wigs, etc. and has some really cute things.  I also bought from them.  Most oncologists offices have them.


    Also, the American Cancer Society offers a FREE wig bank at their offices, and I got a brand new onereally sassy made by Raquel Welch.  Just love it! ...and they retail for $300+.  How wonderful are they!Cool