CSN Login
Members Online: 18

Should I be concerned???

j4mie's picture
j4mie
Posts: 218
Joined: Sep 2013

Pat is about two and a half months out of treatment. Eating seems to be going only ok. He says that most of his taste is back, and he doesn't have trouble swallowing, he just really doesn't seem to have much of an appetite. He is still losing weight. He did have some extra weight to lose, but his oncologist seems to be starting to show some concern with his continued weight loss. Other questions...energy level still really low. He's a trooper for sure, and tries to work as much as possible, but even a few hours wears him out to the point that he comes home and naps for a couple of hours. Lastly, before Pat was diagnosed with tonsil cancer he was a very loud snorer. After he had the tonsilectomy, and all through the rads the snoring had completely stopped. All of a sudden the snoring is back. Has anyone ever heard of snoring having any type of relationship to throat cancer? I know that I am probably just being paranoid, but I can't help but worry...never, ever, ever want to watch him go through this again...any input would be appreciated!

Jamie

KTeacher
Posts: 910
Joined: Jan 2011

Still losing weight and not wanting to eat equals fatigue.  I used to live to eat, now I eat to live.  It is a chore to eat, slow going for me.  He does need to eat.  Can he add a smoothie with added protein powder, or even a milkshake for calories.  When I went back to work after the first go around I was very tired.  Went to work, layed down during lunch break, went home, ate and went to bed.  I needed to rest on Saturday if I was even going to think about going to church on Sunday.  Repeat!  It takes time to rebuild, if he is still losing weight it will take longer to heal (it was the first time in my life I was told not to lose more weight!).  Rest, hydrate and eat.  Eat early, eat often!

debbiejeanne's picture
debbiejeanne
Posts: 2364
Joined: Jan 2010

jamie, it took me well over a year to want to eat again.  that comes very slowly.  as for the snoring, that's a good question.  i'd ask the doc if that could mean anything.  i agree with katie on the low energy, not eating makes him tired.  saying a praying that all these things inprove for him, he can feel better and so can you.

God bless you,

dj

phrannie51's picture
phrannie51
Posts: 3669
Joined: Mar 2012

2 1/2 months out of treatment....I ate what I could, forced myself to eat a little more, but I had absolutely no appetite at all for most of it....my motivation to eat and gain was all about getting the tube removed...period.  If they hadn't held my weight over my head for removal of that appendage, I wouldn't have forced myself so much.

As for the fatigue....I finished treatment the end of August, and didn't start feeling anything like myself until January or February...and even then, I could sleep 11 or 12 hours on my weekends without a hitch.  I got back to 100% sometime since this last fall....so that was an easy year of building back up.

I wonder if the cessation of snoring was because of swelling etc from the rads....that they tweeked his nose and throat enough to stop, but now that he's getting back to normal....swelling going down, etc....if that's not the reason he's started snoring again.

p

CivilMatt's picture
CivilMatt
Posts: 2907
Joined: May 2012

Jamie,

I snored before cancer, during treatments, post treatments and I am still snoring.

I slept well before cancer, during treatments, post treatments and I still sleep well.

I was rarely ever fatigued before cancer, but feel fatigued since treatments.  I am now on thyroid modification and I am feeling better (less tired).

During my 7 month sabbatical from eating (while living on smoothies) I was often asked by my Father “aren’t you hungry?”, but I never was.  Today I have a great appetite and eat like there is no tomorrow (you never know).

No matter what you read here, your husband will follow his own path.  It takes time, effort and good fortune to heal to your “new normal”.  While I feel generally great, I am different.  In many ways my head, neck, mouth, tongue and throat feel like rads was only recently and it has been almost 23 months.

Good luck,

Matt

donfoo's picture
donfoo
Posts: 1192
Joined: Dec 2012

Hi Jamie,

There was a point during my recovery where I could eat again without much pain but it was so slow and laborious and unenjoyable, it was work. And like work some days it is just a drag and you just have to make yourself eat. One way or the other the body requires a minimum of calories and protein is the best while rebuilding wrecked cells. You may want to try 420 as it is proven and well known for stimulating appetite. I did a deep reseach dive into this topic so can direct you as desired.

Don

KTeacher
Posts: 910
Joined: Jan 2011

Don is the man for nutrition.  He can probably link some of his resarch to you.  He did spend time looking into this topic.

wmc's picture
wmc
Posts: 381
Joined: Jan 2014

He needs to eat even tho he doesn't want to. Food just tasts different to many. I have no smell anylonger and food tasts different , like when your nost is pluged from a cold. I lost almost 25lbs, and did not weigh much to begain with. Cream of chicken soup is what helped me gain and feel better. It has twice the caliores than chicken soup. 300 if you eat the whole can and I did. Eat small and often, maybe five times a day to help stop the weight loss. 

As for the snorring returning I would mention it to his doctor. It might not be anything, but best to check.

 I can't snore anymore, vocal cords were removed. 

Bill

catluver96's picture
catluver96
Posts: 73
Joined: Jan 2013

I'm about 15 months post rads. To this day eating is work. 

Just tonight my husband brought me home a bean burrito. After he asked, "how was it?"

I answered "It was work. It was food." I only ate half of it. I also explained how much work and more difficult to get down with little saliva. He nodded in understanding. 

The more tired I feel, the more work it is.

I also lost even more weight after treatment stopped. Figured it from eating healthier diet and becoming more active...just every day stuff around the house. I am no way athletic! ;)   I do like short walks on nice days when able.

Baby steps. 

Warm regards,

Vicki

j4mie's picture
j4mie
Posts: 218
Joined: Sep 2013

I woke up in the middle of the night (Pat's snoring...) and remembered that I had asked for advice on the board. It was comforting to know that when I woke up this morning and signed on to CSN I would be sure to find some input, advice and of course support from all of youi wonderful people. Thank you all for always being here!

Next check up with the oncologist is a little less than a month away. I intend to mention the snoring when we see her. P, you could be right...the idea of swelling going down and the inside starting to get back to an abi-normal state (LOL) and now starting to cause the snoring once again would make sense. When I started thinking about what you said, it made me think to have him try some of those breathe right strips...hmm.

I will try to relax and not be as concerned about the lack of eating and energy. Several of you mentioned that when you are so exhausted it's hard to eat. I read that and realized how true that is. It's so easy to just start worrying and not sit down and think logically about things when you've been in a worry tizzy for so long thanks to "C"...Don, I would love a link to any info you have found about the 420. I have never heard of this, but I am assuming that it is some sort of supplement. Thank you for mentioning it.

I appreciate each one of you so much! Thank you all.

Jamie

donfoo's picture
donfoo
Posts: 1192
Joined: Dec 2012

Hi Jamie,

Hopefully you are in a 21st century state that provides for medical marijuana use. 420 is a code name for MJ. It is often prescribed to boost appetite and when one is fighting to recover from the battle with cancer, it is worth giving serious consideration. I did extensive research into this and was fortunate to participate and volunteer in a expo dedicated to it use last fall in SF. 

http://www.intche.net.

Here are a few links to organizations and sites truely focusing on those needing medical help.

O’Shaughnessy’s - http://www.beyondthc.com/

http://statewidecollective.org/

The first link is a major hub, so start there. Many reputable medical marijuana organizations form a loose network so it cuts a huge amount of time during the vetting process.

Typically associated with being smoked but can also be ingested. Look at the second site and you can read more about dosing via capsules and tinctures. You need to call to get signed up to see their specific products and such. PM me if you want more details without having to contact them.

Good luck,

Don

 

 

 

 

j4mie's picture
j4mie
Posts: 218
Joined: Sep 2013

I'm chuckling about my nieveity Embarassed I guess it's true that "you learn something new every day"!

We live in IL, so medical marajauna is not legal now, but it is on it's way to being legalized we think/hope for the sake of anyone who could truly benefit from it. I do know that marajuana used for medical purposes has a lot of merit. I will check into the sites just for info, and let you know if I/we have any more questions.

Thank you,

Don 

KTeacher
Posts: 910
Joined: Jan 2011

Don,

When I said you were the man to go to about nutrition, I wasn't talking about pot!  You had put up a thread about sugary drinks as opposed to healthy meal supplements.

Bev

(remember I use a larger font because of my vision, I am not yelling!)

hwt's picture
hwt
Posts: 1882
Joined: Jun 2012

I still swear by a single Ensure every morning. When I have tried to quit, I notice a change in my energy level. Worth a try.

j4mie's picture
j4mie
Posts: 218
Joined: Sep 2013

Definitely worth a try!

Thank you!

Jamie

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network