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3 Groin Lumps

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

Hello,

I am new to this website and was hoping you all would be so kind as to give me some advice. I am a 25 year female who is in partial remission for papillary thyroid cancer with a possible new health problem. I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 2008 which was very aggressive and located on my vocal cord which is why I will always be in partial remission. They decided to watch that tumor instead of losing my ability to talk.

For the past two months I have been experiencing persistent nausea, severe headaches, brain fog, memory problems, weight loss, joint pain, muscle weakness, easy bruising, low appetite, and severe fatigue. I have seen my family doctor who told me I just need to relax and prescribed me xanax, basically just looking to kick me out the door. I saw my endocrinologist who said everything on the thyroid front is fine and referred me to neurology. I am still waiting for that appointment but I had a non contrast head CT which was clean.

A week ago I discovered one groin lump on the right side which was the size of a pea. It does not hurt, it is not red, it is not swollen, cannot be seen but only felt, and I have not had an infection/cold. That lump has gotten bigger, still round like a pea but bigger, and now there are two more close by in my groin. Those a more oblong or kidney bean shaped and are smaller than the first one I found.

I do not believe I have a hernia or an STD. I have an appointment with my OBGYN on Thursday and am very nervous. I guess what I would like to know is if I even need to be concerned about lymphoma? I have read that radioactive iodine used to treat thyroid cancer has been linked to lymphoma. I had three very large doses of radioactive iodine. For anyone who found their lymphoma in their groin, did it feel like what I was describing?

I am ready to tackle anything head on, I have done this once, I will do it again. Honestly, the waiting game is more stressful.

Any advice would be very much appreciated.

Olivia

Shoopy
Posts: 210
Joined: Jul 2013

Olivia,

I am sorry to read what you're going through.  I also agree that the waiting is the most stressful part.  I am sure others will chime in but here's my experiences.

I was Dx with diffused large B cell in May.  I am a 48yo male.  My initial symptoms were: night sweats, shortness of breath, and minor weight loss.  I was stage IVB with chest and abdomen involved...and spleen involvement (it was about the size of a lung).  After 2 cycles of R-CHOP, my oncologist realized I wasn't responding the way he wanted and referred me to Roswell Park in Buffalo (about 20 min from my home).  In the week I waited to meet with them, my groin, armpits, and neck became involved.  I experiences minor pain in those areas when they became involved.

I also drove myself nuts after the next two rounds of R-DHAC.  I would mistakening feel those areas (esp. the groin) and think I was feeilng nodes when I now know its cartilage/ligaments.  It's odd because they felt round...but they weren't nodes.

I'm sure you know that your mind plays tricks on you.  There are also many, many non-lymphoma reasons lymph nodes will swell.  The only way to tell for sure is a biopsy.

You may want to consider asking for a oncologist/hematologist if you don't have one. 

Regardless, lymphoma is something that you can beat.  Stay positive and faithful!

Hope that helps,

Karl 

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

Thank you for taking the time to tell me your experience. 

Do you know if cartilage and ligaments can feel like a pea or little bb's? That is what I am feeling.

 

Thank you for your encouragement.

Shoopy
Posts: 210
Joined: Jul 2013

I can tell you that I mistook mine for nodes.  My nodes were right at the bend of my leg.

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 1220
Joined: May 2012

Olivia,

Shoopy's comments are identical to any I would give.  See the doc Thursday and share all of the concerns you have listed here.  It is very common for new folks to submit "Does This Sound Like Cancer?" questions.  Most, it seems (I have no exact numbers) end up being some benign (non-cancerous) issue.  Worry is UNIVERSAL, however.

The groin area is a part of the body that has some of the highest concentrations of nodes, so first-detection there is not uncommon, and hopefully some of the readers who have had pelvic lymphoma issues will comment (other node-dense regions are the armpits and lower neck).

Almost any cancer treatment is "linked" to some other cancer in this or that study, but ordinarily the likelihood is astronomically low, so at this point I wold not let earlier iodine treatments worry me . There are around 200 FDA-approved chemo drugs, and I have never read about any one of them that was not linked to some other problem, so that is just part of the treatment universe.  It is worthless to worry about such issues. 

What I WOULD demand of your doctor is the following:  If he or she says,"I don't think it is lymphoma," then demand to know what it IS. It may not be lyumphoma, but it is something.  Make them tell you what.   An infinitly-long treatment with antibiotics thinking it is some form of infection does not tell you what it is, either.

max

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

I sincerely appreciate your excellent advice and taking your time to respond to me. 

 

Worry is universal and the intense want for an answer is also universal. I have been so sick for two months and trying to find someone who went through something similar is helpful Lymphoma or no lymphoma.

Thank you.

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 1220
Joined: May 2012

It is frustrating, getting shuffled from doctor to doctor.  It was at least two months from when a CT first showed huge nodes all over, until I received my first treatment.  Everyone here will tell you that aggressiveness and demanding answers is the most important survival trait you can have when facing, or possibly facing, cancer.  Most non-oncologists do not have a lot of experience, or expertise, in diagnosing cancer, and will make every attempt to explain something as non-cancerous whenever possible.

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

Yes I have experiened that. I had a huge node in my neck for years. They brushed it off in boot camp and during my military service as a node still enlarged from having mono 5 years prior. I accepted that answer but never will again. It was a tumor the size of a lemon. I know every lump isn't cancer but after going through that I demand a thorough investigation.

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

To anyone out there..

 

My appt is tomorrow and I am hoping to get a step farther in finding out what is wrong with me..

 

Hoping for a groin lymph node ultrasound since my obgyn has those capabilities. 

 

 

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

Obgyn said the biggest lump isnt extremely large so he doesnt want to immediately jump into scans. He wants to start with blood work. He said there is zero sign of infection from my female exam so nothing obgyn related is causing my groin lumps. Since he said nothingis obgyn related i need to tell my endocrine oncologist because of possbile leukemia and lymphoma. 

 

I had my blood work done a month ago and it was normal. What are the chances it will be abnormal a month later???

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 1220
Joined: May 2012

Olivia,

Sorry your doc did exactly what I hoped he would not do -- "Wait."  Unfortunately, blood work can come back mostly normal, even in cases where there is significant lymphoma.  For others, labs come back severely out of wack. Mine came back near-normal across the board, although I had extensive, widespread cancer, and I have heard many others here say the same thing.  Be sure they are doing a full CBC and testing your Sedementation Rate and LDH .

Note: I did NOT say "LDL," which is a cholesterol test.   I said "LDL," which measures cell or tissue death, which can be caused by cancer, trauma, arthritis, or several other factors, but it is a good lymphoma marker.

 

Of course, blood tests can change in a month, or remain the same.  Look and see if you had Sedementation and LDL tests in that set of labs. If not, have these tests done (my layman's recommendation)  . Compared to a CT, these labs are very inexpensive.

Having had a previous cancer, it is worth looking in to.

 

LDL:   http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/ldh/tab/test

 

Sedementation:  http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/esr/tab/test

 

.

illead's picture
illead
Posts: 566
Joined: Aug 2012

Please forgive me, I'm only saying this to prevent confusion.  At the end of your post, you were saying LDL but you meant LDH didn't you?  Just checking.  I know it was just a typo.  Becky

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

Thank you both so much.

 

I had a sedimation rate done a month ago which was 8.0 and normal. I do not believe my obgyn is repeating that test. He mentioned cbc and electrolytes. I believe the results will come back tomorrow.

 

I plan on nudging my endocrine oncologist more when I seem him monday morning. I will mention the ldh test. 

 

Being that my endo sees way more cancer patients he may be willing to do more. To me a lump is a lump is a lump no matter how big or small...

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 1220
Joined: May 2012

Yes, you are correct Becky. Thanks !

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

I saw my blood work results. He did a cbc and a metabolic. Since I am not a doctor the numbers mean nothing to me so I emailed my dr with no reply. Since its 430 on a friday I'm guessing monday..

oliviausher1
Posts: 11
Joined: Dec 2013

Saw my endo oncologist today and he said the lump is very small and need to watch it " but he is a head and neck oncologist so this isn't his area" he said. I called my obgyn for results and the nurse said he hadn't seen them yet so she coulnt tell me results.

 

I did not get a call back.

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