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Is there anything I can do to help my synthroid Rx work better after total thyroidectomy?

vickys61
Posts: 2
Joined: Oct 2013

I had a total thyroidectomy four years ago.  My dosage has been changed from time to time and now my levels show that I may be on the hyper side and my dosage may be too high but my symptoms of fatigue, memory loss, fuzzy thinking and constipation imply that I am hypo.  I am going through menopause for the past year and I am taking bio-identical progestrone and estrogen cream.  I read tips of how to help your thyroid work better so I wonder if any of those tips will help my Rx work better.

Baldy's picture
Baldy
Posts: 239
Joined: Mar 2011

Hi Vicky,

There's the basic stuff of waiting an hour after taking TRH before eating and not taking anything with Calcium in it either four hours before or after.  These two (and a few more) are on the sheet that comes with your prescription which I guess you've already read.

Maybe you could try adding a T3 drug to your synthroid which I think is a T4 drug.  Also, I've read some articles on the older desicated animal thyroid drugs.  One of them may fix your symptoms and give you normal blood numbers.  I believe one of the brand names is Armour.  The problem is most doctors refuse to prescribe the older drugs.

Maybe the best thing you can do is convince your doctor to listen to your symptoms and ignore the blood work!

Alan

PS I'm two and a half years post TT and have had no problems with my TRH.

vickys61
Posts: 2
Joined: Oct 2013

thank you, I had forgotten about the calcium.  this may be my problem.

Baldy's picture
Baldy
Posts: 239
Joined: Mar 2011

Hi Vicky (and everyone),

I guess this would be a good place to review the instructions that come with our TRH prescription.  I know I haven't read this stuff in a while and I guess many of you also haven't read it in a while either.

 1. Some medicines or medical condistions may interact with TRH, make sure your doctor and pharmiscist know what else you may be taking (Over the Counter too) and what other conditions you may have.

2. Let your doctor know if you have had a recent or will have an upcoming surgery.

3. Take on an empty stomach at least one half hour to an hour before eating.

4. Take with plenty of water (at least 8oz).

5. Do not take any medicine or vitamins containing iron or calcium within 4 hours of taking TRH.  Or, take TRH at least 4 hours after taking iron or calcium and don't take iron or calcium until at least 4 hours after taking TRH.

6. If you have trouble swallowing the pill, you may crush it and add it to water, mix in and drink it as soon as possible after crushing.

7. Store the medicine between 68 and 77 degrees. Protect from heat, light and moisture.  (My note: The medicine cabinet in the bathroom is NOT a good place to store.  The top of a dresser or book shelf that never gets any sun light in your bed room is a good place.)

8. The medicine works best if taken the same time every day.  (My note: This can be when you wake up or just before going to bed.  My sister, who has Hashimotos Thyroiditis takes hers before bed and hasn't had any problems.)

9. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible.  If you are getting close to your next dose, than skip the dose you missed.  Do NOT take two doses at once.  (My note: The instructions don't say how close is "close", I would guess at least 8 hours, but I don't know.)

10. If you become pregnant while taking TRH, contact your doctor.  Mothers taking TRH have TRH in their breast milk.

11. Possible side effects (contact your doctor for any): change in appetite; change in menstrual period; chest pain; diarrhea; excessive sweating; fast or irregular heart beat; fever; heat intolerance; joint pain; leg cramps; mental or mood changes; muscle weakness; seizures; severe or persistent headache or fatigue; shortness of breath; stomach cramps; tremors; trouble sleeping; unusual weight gain or loss; vomiting; or wheezing.

12. Possible allergic reaction (seek immeadiate medical attention): rash; hives; itching; flushing; difficulty breathing; tightness in chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips or tongue; unusual hoarsness.

13. Overdose symptoms (if an overdose is suspected, contact an emergency room immeadiately): coma; confusion; disorientation; and seizures.

Wow! Long list! But I'm glad I read it again and since I also transcribed it, Im less likely to forget anything now.  Anyway it's probably a good idea to review this stuff every so often as there may be changes in the instructions from time to time.

Alan

PS Vicky, numbers 3, 4 & 5 are the ones that you are interested in.

PPS Don't assume your doctors know this stuff.  Immeadiately following my total thyroidectemy, they found my blood calcium was a little low so they gave me a calcium supplement ... at the same time as my TRH-levothyroxin!  This was in the hospital, the attending physician and the surgeon both missed this.  I didn't bother reading the instructions that came with the levothyroxin until after I was off the calcium supplement, too late then!

PPS Calcium is also found in fiber laxative/supplement pills.

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