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Pink Month Feelings

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

I posted the below feelings on a personal FB site that my sister set up for me.  Danny thought that I should share it here.  Let me know how YOU feel!

 

As October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, approaches, I have some feelings I would like to share as a breast cancer warrior. Some of them may be controversial or sound critical, but, please remember, I am just ventilating personal feelings and not a spokeswoman for cancer. 
1. Pink is nice. I actually love the color, but, before you purchase something pink, think about it. Probably 99% of the pink merchandise out there says it is to support "breast cancer awareness." This means it benefits the seller and not research or a legitimate charity This year, instead of buying pink socks, think about making a donation to a local cancer center, cancer research or a legitimate charity.
2. I am personally uncomfortable with the "Save the Ta Ta's" and "Save the Hooters" merchandise. It has nothing to do with being a prude, but everything about my feelings that these slogans perpetuate a myth that breasts are what matters most to a breast cancer victim. I would guess most of us are more interested in the illness and deaths that breast cancer causes. 
I have a sense of humor, but far too many suffer and die from this disease and, although progress has been made with early stage breast cancer, very slow progress has been made with Stage 4 (partially because, until very recently <5% was spent on metastatic disease even though 90% with metastases died from the disease). Forget the Ta Ta's and make me healthy!
3. Hearing people say that a mastectomy is a "mutilating" surgery pisses me off. Would anyone tell an amputee that they are mutilated? I personally have had reconstructive surgery (and am happy I did), but no woman should feel pressured to have these surgeries--they are painful and tough surgeries.
4. Do not share "cures" such as kudzu tea with me. Sell it somewhere else. I am busy fighting for my life. It is exhausting for most of us to listen to these stories.
5. Do not "blame the victim." I often hear people thoughtlessly say that they believe so and so got breast cancer because of diet, weight, attitude, etc. I was 33 and doing Jane Fonda videos when I was diagnosed and have 2 sisters who were young and healthy when they were diagnosed also. I do believe that folks may do this because they are frightened that they will get the disease and they try to distance themselves this way. But doing this is hurtful to those who are battling the illness (even if they don't eat right, etc...Lol). 
6. Cheerleading, prayers, encouragement, good wishes are all so helpful to me. Horror stories about Aunt Mildred who died the worst death ever from bc are not helpful. 
7. Also, do not forget the caregiver. Danny has been my rock and, if you want to make me smile, don't forget to do something nice for him (a meal, a coffee, a kind word). He has to be physically and emotionally exhausted at times, but he has always done his best to hide it from me.
8. And did I mention how much I love and appreciate my support? I have been blessed with receiving unbelievably kind and sensitive encouraging words that have lifted me up so much. Thank you all from the bottom of my heart.
9. And thanks for letting me get this off my chest . It is an October phenomenon for me...Lol.

fauxma's picture
fauxma
Posts: 3572
Joined: Dec 2008

I am so in agreement with all that you have said.   You put it very well   I do not choose to invest in pink products that end up only giving a tiny portion of the price to cancer.  I would rather find a place to donate where my entire donation will go to research for a cure.   It is a great thing to continue the message that woman should be getting mammograms and that everyone, men or women so do self exams but that message should be all year long and not used to turn an original idea into a pink cash cow for manufacturers.  I do respect that other love the whole concept, it just doesn't do it for me.

And I love your hooray for our caregivers.  My Den is my rock also.  Couldn't have gotten through any of it without.

You had so many great points on every level and you put it in a way that reflects your feelings without sounding like it is the only viewpoint. Everyone here looks at these things in different ways and what give comfort to one might not comfort someone else.  We are all on a cancer journey but our paths and final destinations are as diverse as we are.  But sometimes what one person says resonants with us.  Your post resonanted with me.   

I hope that we see lots of viewpoints on Pink October.  For some it is great and inspires, others might hate the reminder of cancer, some might hate that it is awareness and not a search for the cure.  Newbies may feel different than old timers,  Stage 1 might feel differnt than Stage IV.   Let's hear how we feel about the pinkness of October.  Love it, hate it, indifferent to it.   Everyone has an opinion and none are right or wrong.  Vent about it or praise it.   What's your take on it?

thank you for starting this post.

Stef

 

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Thanks Stef!  I really do love many things about Pink October, but my feelings are so mixed--especially with the recent deaths here.  One of my physician friends was actually encouraging the sale of a cute "Save the Hooters" shirt and I love her, but I still don't like the shirts.  It just feels like they are saying it is more important to save the breasts than the lives and I know rationally this is not what they mean, but they just don't feel right for me.

Margeaux
Posts: 79
Joined: Dec 2011

So much of what you said I agree with.  Have to admit that I am still into "pink", today I wore a glittery pink ribbon pin to my oncologist visit (which went well).  This pin was given to me by a lady whose generous donations helped equip a state-of-the art breast center.  Bless you, Bobetta Lindig.  However, I am sceptical too, of the pink merchandise, unless the claim is made by a reputable company, they have too much to lose.  I experienced every one of the points you mentioned, could write a book about remarks made to me, including this gem at the beginning of my treatment "now you are a realistic person, you know that the only thing oncologists want is your money, once you got cancer......", you should have had organic food only, then.... , or to second guess the oncologist's treatment program, because, after all, she saw an hour's program on PBS.  I finally had to tell everyone firmly, unless you have been to medical school, no suggestions, please.  Don't send me any forwards about cancer treatment, or the fact milk will cause cancer! Like you I am so glad to have found this site, even though I am not posting much lately.  I found the support I do not have in my life.  Do you remember when someone on this board decided against chemotherapy in favor of using some form of cannabis oil?  She met a practicioner of this snake oil at a party.  Husband is a difficult man to live with, but during my treatment when I was often so sick, the really "manned up" .

Hugs, Margeaux

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Margeaux, I actually love pink and still wear pink ribbon jewelry and have a blanket with pink ribbons on it that I carry with me to chemo.

I don't want to cut off my nose to spite my face (so to speak) and I have often been thrilled with the focus on breast cancer awareness in October (and the money that does pour into some legitimate charities).  

But I do have mixed feelings because, somewhere along the line, everyone and their brother seemed to be making a profit off of pink merchandise.  I just keep thinking if everyone gave directly to a cancer center or to research...well you get my point.

I do remember the cannabis oil.  It about made me crazy...Lol.  Recently a neighbor wants me to try tree sap and I really did have a radiology nurse tell me that kudzu tea cures breast cancer.  I rarely say anything but it does tire me out just to listen to the "cures."

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

Dear CC,

I agree 100% to what you posted.  Thank you for putting this up before Pink October.

I have mellowed somewhat since last year, though I do understand the celebration.  There is a need for Komen Race for Cure to provide funds that go to other areas that is not science related, helping with transportations, helping with lymphedema compression sleeves (which I have benefitted indirectly).  I can understand why those who finished their first and hopefully only round with BC to be celebrating.  However, I do wish Komen did remember we stage IV people a little better, after all Susan Komen was stage IV too.

Specially believe that one has to watch their money when something says it supports Breast Cancer.  How much are they giving, is their a cap on their donation, if you like the pink towel, buy it but don't believe your giving money to save people from bc.  Give to legitimate organizations, Metavivor is one that every penny goes to BC Stage IV research. ACS and your local cancer center.

One of them, I believe it was save the Ta Tas that their money went towards awareness.  What planet are they from I think I email them that people were not aware of breast cancer.

Thanks again for bringing it up. 

Doris

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Thanks Doris!  I am encouraged that Komen is now giving more money to Stage 4.  I think many of the charities are now beginning to listen to the criticism.  Just hope it lasts!  

BTW, OT, I thought of you recently when I read the recent Audubon Magazine about Steve Kress and his contribution to reintroducing puffins to Maine.  See: http://mag.audubon.org/articles/birds/puffin-man

I didn't even know there were puffins in the US--shame on me!  Have you seen a puffin?  Is Easter Egg Rock near you?

I am glad you have had a positive experience with the drivers.  Sounds like a good way to give back--maybe when we are feeling better?!  Big hugs!

fauxma's picture
fauxma
Posts: 3572
Joined: Dec 2008

October is bittersweet for me as it was October 23rd when I had my biospies and found out I had breast cancer so sometimes all that pink is just a sad reminder.  But I like the concept of it, just not the overkill of stuff that claims it supports breast cancer.   Any money I donate goes to ACS or Relay for LIfe and now that Doris mentioned Metavivors I will look into that as well.  I don't have as much to donate now but I always do something each year.

Stef

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

CC,

Thank you for the article on the puffins.  I am not familiar with the name of the Island but I do have somewhere on one of my bookshelves, that story about the puffins written by Frank Graham Jr. and his wife Ada.  I know the Grahams as my former husband and now my son run a bird sanctuary.  I never seen a puffin as they are sea birds.  After living all these years in Maine, I've only taken one trip across the bay, I have been on whale watches and similar excursions.  Frank must be up in years.

Best to you,

Doris

 

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

I found this on another web page but finally SK is finally acknowledging MBC.  To bad they waited so long and I hope more money will be giving to research stage IV.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Los Angeles is having it's first ever Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC) event on Saturday, October 5, 2013 from 10am - 2pm. There will be educational lectures and networking opportunities for those living with metastatic / advanced / stage 4 breast cancer (MBC) to meet each other and share experiences.

All who are living with metastatic breast cancer in Southern California are cordially invited to attend this FREE groundbreaking event! Bring your loved ones and caregivers too.

Please share this event information with anyone who may benefit from attending, including clinics and cancer centers.

The Los Angeles Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure invites you to attend their first conference on:

Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer 
10 am - 2 pm on Saturday, October 5th, 2013 The Olympic Collection Conference Center 

11301 Olympic Blvd #204 / Los Angeles, CA 90064

This FREE event is sponsored by Susan G. Komen, LA County Affiliate and Anthem Blue Cross of California.

· Learn how others with metastatic breast cancer cope with advanced breast cancer 
· Learn about available resources and the latest advances in treatment 
· Network and connect with others living with metastatic breast cancer 
· Learn about integrated medicine, treatment, and the impact of the Affordable Care Act from experts in the field, including: Dr. Sara Hurvitz /UCLA, Dr.Debu Tripathy / USC, Dr. Patricia Ganz/UCLA and more! 
· Lunch, snacks and drinks will be served free of charge

To RSVP and for more information, please contact Gauri Joshi at

GJoshi@komenlacounty.org 

or 

(310) 575-3011 Ext. 14 
or 
via Facebook at: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/140876706121604/

Sincerely,

Dikla Benzeevi 
11-year advanced breast cancer thriver

 

1surfermom's picture
1surfermom
Posts: 295
Joined: Mar 2009

Thank you CC  for your eloquent post. I couldn't agree more. I especially like your mention of the care giver, I often think that cancer is a family disease and it affects those around us just as profoundly.  A friend of my teen aged son  once wore the "I love boobies" bracelet, it really annoyed me. I told him that it was nice that he was supporting the cause but that I wasn't that crazy about my own breasts since it seems that my breasts were trying to kill me. He was pretty quiet after that. Love Surf 

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

I absolutely love your reply to the teen!  I may have to quote you Smile!  

 

Cricket64
Posts: 63
Joined: Sep 2013

Adding my own, 'well done' comment.  And the same to everyone else who replied before me.  We all have to be very careful what source we gather our 'battle plan from', and who we will allow to 'to enter our safe zone'.  I am now a two year survivor, but cancer, still lurks in the shadows.  One of the best bits of advice I received right after my diagnosis, came from our former pastor and dear friend.  He know that our new pastor, and I just did not see eye to eye, and attending his services, only upset me more.  ( an interesting situation, considering that my husband is the music director ).  The advice, although simple, was so profound at me:  He said, pick your battles, and to put myself on the top of the what works list.  Perhaps not the answer his superiors would have approved up, but as the following Sundays rolled around, I choose to take calming walks with my dog, and felt better.

 

Double Whammy's picture
Double Whammy
Posts: 2449
Joined: Jun 2010

Pink October did a wonderful job In raising awareness and raising funds.  Komen did a wonderful job.    I am for anything legitimate that helps women/men with breast cancer in any way(research, financial, access to care, etc).   Unfortunately, I think the general public has really had it with all the pink.  And that's really a shame.  This week I encountered two situations that bring that home .

1.  A friend informed me Friday that September is also Alzheimers Awareness month (she thought Sept was Breast Cancer Awareness month).  She went on to proclaim that breast cancer is all but cured so all the $$ given for breast cancer research should go to Alzheimers research instead.  Really?  I hope I helped her understand that bc is not all but cured and  she should look into what is being done for Alzheiners research or not and get involved if she feels that strongly.  No one could argue that it is not a worthy cause, but so is breast cancer.  I guess she's sick of the pink. 

2.  Today I helped at an Ovarian Cancer run/walk.  Setpember is Gynecologic/Ovarian Cancer Awareness month.   I was happy to help our sisters in teal.  Conversations amongst various participants included comments about all the publicity and fundraising dedicated to breast cancer and yet most women don't know about the warning signs of gyn cancers, hence they they're often not diagnosed until they are in an advanced stage.  It was a nice turnout, but nothing like all the breast cancer walks/runs. 

   I don't know what the answer is, but I do want fundraising to continue and I want the public to know that this is still necessary and why.   I find all of the profits being made from breast cancer merchandise troubling, but the mere fact that people are annoyed by all of this shows that we are aware.

Suzanne

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

I don't want to be misunderstood, because I love so much about Pink October.  I love the infusion of money into breast cancer and I love the legitimate coverage and focus on our cause.  At the same time, I can't help having mixed feelings. 

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

The causes you mention are all worthy one.  They all need hope and cure.

I was very tired of pink because I associated with ignoring the fact that the disease was far from being cure, none was even in the works.  I associated all that pink stuff profiting from the disease and giving so little if anything back for research.  Though Susan Komen Foundation did wonderful things, only a % was being given the research and the fact that they didn't want to acknowledge stage IV, ignoring us really bummed me out.  I hope more will go into research now and less into administration.  There was something very wrong about that fact.

I do believe they might be coming around.  Nancy Brinker did a lot for breast cancer but "for the cure" was being missed by miles.

A donation to some of the worthy causes of breast cancer especially if the research is to find a cure is worth more than buying a pink tea towel, pink hat or trowel.   Less Pink and More Green should be the new motto.

Doris

 

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

I love what your former pastor said!  We have to do what works for us now.  And I love my walks which are sometimes very short now, but I try whenever I can.  Hard to say who moves slower--my geriatric dogs or me...Lol.

 

desertgirl947's picture
desertgirl947
Posts: 554
Joined: Oct 2012

I do not like those "I love boobies" bracelets at all.  I see high school students at the school where I work wearing those bracelets.  Most of them are wearing the bracelets with a different meaning in mind and/or they like being able to wear something with the word "boobies" on it.  (I won't  say ALL because that is not a safe word to use.)

Although I do appreciate all the attention that comes to breast cancer and the hope of its eventual demise due to advances in medicine, I wish the same were true for other cancers as well -- that they had their months . . . that they had their walks . . . and the list goes on.  Some cancers have a very quick death rate (i.e. pancreatic, which two of my aunts had); some cancers require treatments that take years (i.e. leukemia, which two of my friends' toddler-aged grandkids have endured). 

lizzie17
Posts: 536
Joined: Nov 2009

I  completely agree with you about everything.  I really dislike pink now, and I also resent the Save the Ta-Ta's----mine  are gone and

every day I continue to pray and fight.  And some  people ask, How are you? I respond "oh fine, thanks"  and then it  is "NO, I Mean

how are you REALLY"?  I don't like to talk about it.  Ever....except to a few special long-time friends.  I feel like the others are just

curious.  Not compassionate.

My "caregiver" has changed my almost entire diet to organic.  I just hate the concentrated effort on what I eat (I am still overweight).

He has never weighed over 150. 

Friday I had a STAT breast ultrasound with 3 enlarged lymph nodes under my right arm.  They appear benign.............just wondering

why they are not doing a biopsy...

WOW, thank you all for listening. This post is all over the place!!!! 

Hugs,

Carol

 

sandra4611's picture
sandra4611
Posts: 121
Joined: Sep 2013

As someone new to the fight, I do so appreciate the wisdom of those who are ahead of me. I was uncomfortable with the whole awaremess/merchandise thing but couldn't put my finger on why. Guess it's because I was only diagnosed 2 months ago and haven't had time yet to explore those feelings. Too busy with BMX, complications, 2nd surgery, drains, PICC lines and IV vancomycin for nearly a month. Thanks for helping me understand those little voices in my head. Sometimes I feel those voices are speaking a language I've never heard, don't understand and don't WANT to understand. But the feelings that come with the words linger and nag at me.

I don't understand the goal of saving breasts. Shouldn't the focus be on saving lives? When I was diagnosed I was astounded that the medical personnel just assumed I would want to "save" my breasts by having a lumpectomy instead of mastectomy, and then later assumed I would want nipple sparing surgery. (I didn't.) I'm not a valuable person unless I have nipples? The decision to also have "a perfectly healthy breast removed" seemed to horrify some of the medical personnel who kept saying the chances of developing it there were so low, it didn't make sense. In the end they respected my decisions. Good thing because the pathology report should the "good breast" also had cancer - in fact was slightly more advanced - but hadn't shown up on any of the mammograms or MRI.  

I ended up having immediate reconstruction with implants...not because I felt I needed breasts or even wanted them, but because the surgeon just assumed I would and had already made plans with the plastic surgeon to do it.  I didn't have much time to think about it (3 days from diagnosis to meeting the surgeon) and really couldn't think of a reason why not. One side turned out fine, the other didn't and required a second surgery. Two more will be needed. Sometimes I wish I'd waited to have the reconstruction until I fully understood what I was getting myself into.

October should be "Aware That There Is More To Breast Cancer Than Boobs" Month. 

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Sandra, I am so very sorry to hear of all that you have been through!  Just wanted to say that I am glad that you found the MB and I know your insights will help others.  Gentle hugs and prayers and please keep us posted on how you are doing!

Lavender babe
Posts: 5
Joined: Sep 2013

Definitely agree with all you have said.  I find it beyond reprehensible that people have created this farce to benefit from the suffering of women everywhere.

Pink is a great color until you associate it with breast cancer.

Sad that people are such sheep to follow such ridiculous hyperbole.

A cancer diagnosis leaves most people subject to a wide arena of con artists, trying to sell you a miracle cure, this is almost worse because it is trying to sell you hope in a lie.  May God have mercy on their souls.

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1920
Joined: Jul 2009

Last October, I researched and presented a talk on "Surviving October" at my church, for a Sunday service we held honoring all cancer survivors.

I include a bit of the history of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month -- but most meaningful for me was talking with some members of the Colorectal Cancer board here on CSN, and including their thoughts on all the attention breast cancer gets, their frustration that breast cancer has become the "sexy cancer."  I agree with what Suzanne and desertgirl have said here about awareness months for other forms that cancer that go unnoticed, and grueling treatments that many who have other forms of cancer have to endure.

My "Surviving October" talk is posted on my Expressions page, 3rd post from the top.  I'm still very proud of it.

Traci

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

I said it last year and I will say it this year.  Would you consider putting your essay of "Surviving October" on the discussion board?  It is excellent.  Some may go to your Expressions page, some may not.  All should read it.

Doris

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1920
Joined: Jul 2009

Doris, I remember how supportive you were when I gave my talk last year, and so appreciate your praise.  I do think it's too long to post directly on this board, which is why I posted it on my Expressions page instead.

If anyone would like to read it, just click on TraciInLA right

<--- here, then on the Expressions tab.

But maybe I should update my talk?  This morning, at the grocery store, there was a big display of breast cancer awareness kettle corn.  Yes, big bags of Angie's Kettle Corn all decked out in pink -- they do state that they will donate 5 cents per bag to the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Genome Guided Therapy Study, so I appreciate they they're specific about how much they're donating and to where.  

Geez, WHERE was breast cancer awareness kettle corn last year?  I could have passed it around to the congregation and let them crunch away while I talked!

Laughing Traci

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

I do hope people will go read your essay.  

Stating the amount and where it is going is great.  If there is no amount stated with a specific donor, people should not buy.  I just read an article on what the tsunami of pinkness and how little improvement it has given us.  It knocked Komen of course but I do believe that they might be turning the corner.  Either that or I am just so hoping more of their research fund will be larger than their administration budget.

Doris 

 

 

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Traci, I just finally found your beautifully written and poignant, "Surviving October" talk.  Thank you so much for sharing it.  I am embarrassed that it took me so long to find it, but, unfortunately, I really do believe I have chemo brain going on right now. 

But I am so glad that I did find it!  I really appreciate your mentioning other cancers--the pink stuff is making me feel cruddy about my friend with Stage 4 lung cancer right now.

Also, I am so glad you brought up how isolating cancer can be.  I was so physically ill the last 5 months, I was by necessity (white count so low, exhausted, etc.) more isolated than I have ever been.  My beloved career is on hold and my world has really shrunk.  You really hit the nail on the head for me and made me feel less alone. 

You should be proud! Thank you.

 

 

bledford's picture
bledford
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2013

I think your comments were dead on especially the "Aunt Mildred" thing.  I have thought several times about writing a book on how to talk cancer patients. I too was diagnosed in October and I can remember looking around thinking these people have no idea. My boss even offered to take the stuff down the company had up.  Everyone needs to know the reason behind the ribbon. I think sometimes people think its pretty and they are doing a good thing but they need to be sure the reason they buy it is real.

camul's picture
camul
Posts: 2242
Joined: Dec 2010

I do understand it is bcuz more die from bc than other forms of cancer. However, It uas gotten where I feel exploited with so many profiting from this horrid disease. Aso, billboards stating that early diagnosis gives 99% cure rate! This gives people the message that people dont die of bc. I personally know that isnt right, I am one of the 30% with stage iv who will not make it. Which brings me to my biggest gripe, that more money is raised for bc, yet under 5% (last year went up, which I helieve that not more money was given to adv research but that way less money was taken in, thus, the raise in percentage points) is used for adv research to actually find a cure. So as my time is looming closer, being one of the 30%, and having tumors that did not respond well to chemo , I have a very hard time seeing people profiting financially from this horrid disease, and seeing that all this awareness hype is giving people the impression that bc is one of the "good cancers" to get if you are going to get cancer.
Thanks s CC,
Carol

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

Carol,

Before I was diagnose with breast cancer, I thought they were close to a cure.  My friend had ovarian cancer and I was so grateful that mine was breast cancer with so many raising money for that cure.  It didn't take me long to learn the truth.  I worked in a library where I did have all kinds of articles, books and anything I needed at my finger tips to endlessly research this topic before the internet and before I purchase my first computer.

In an article I just read, The National Breast Cancer Awareness Month was launched in 1985.  It asked the questions:

Have survival rates improved? Are treatments less toxic? Are fewer people diagnosed? The answer is "no" to each of these success factors.  

I believe that early detection doesn't really mean much, all that pinking that we will see in October only means that people are profiting on a cruel disease.  It has always made me angry, so in October anything with a pink ribbon I don't buy.  

Best to you,

Doris

 

Lynn Smith
Posts: 1265
Joined: Mar 2011

I'm a 4 year survivor. It was non invasive and Stage 0.Still I don't feel comfortable.I have the cancer gene and even though it is early stage doesn't make me feel any better and probably any others who are once told"You have breast cancer". In the beginning I went out and brought ribbons, bracelets shirts and necklaces.Now I prefer none of that.I went into the store the other day and so much Pink.A few years ago I was in awe about it all but not now. 

Since dx I get so much from people. if I mention I lost  a few lbs 2 times a friend had to ask me "is Your cancer back".One time it hurt the next time I was ticked and really don't feel like talking to her.She hasn't seen me but when we talk it's about "is your cancer back".If and when it ever does come back I don't think I'd tell her. So I guess the cancer thing is dwindling down for me. I get so hurt and upset hearing what so many are going through and some are fighting a fierce battle.Then we have those who lose the battle and it hurts. I know that it could be me someday, another Pink Sister or a family member or friend.  

Breast Cancer does get alot more recognition than any of the other cancers.There's so many of us who've been dx with it. I support it but the Pink thing(wearing it) I'm giving up.Although I will ride the Pink Bus to support those who are going for tests appts or procedures. The Pink Bus is important. 

Honeslty there are times I wish I hadn't told many people I did tell. I prefer to be more private. If it ever comes back I will be more discreet.  

Lynn Smith

24242
Posts: 1417
Joined: Mar 2001

I guess I am to much of a realist to find comfort in the CURE.  I am starting to get mad that all we have heard about is the successful cure rates and have almost closeted the fact that cancer rates rapidly rising especially since my own diagnosis and treatment for this disease. 

I almost fell over when I heard that 2 in 5 or 1 in 3 people in my country will be diagnosed with cancer.  Yet we are not talking about that or the strain it is having on our health system.  Now more and more people get paid less and have less benefits to help offset health care costs because unlike what people think it costs us all to have a good system in place nothing is free.

When I was diagnosed they had delisted allot of medication that was covered before and the price of my care went up drastically having to now pay for expensive medications that were needed in my treatment phases.  I am mad that densification of our cities seems to be having a direct result on cancer rates though no one wants to talk about it Tax dollars more important cities and provinces/states than ever before and less middle income earners to pay for.

I am mad that we ship things across our seas that we don't allow in our own countries and let other countries contaminate the world and no one cares it seems including my own government here in Canada.  If you listen to my leader Canada is the greatest place to live though we can barely afford our homes and lives working harder and longer than we ever have leading to the stress we are suppose to avoid.  Doesn't this sound all too familiar...  Just reading about this scares the hell out of me and big corporate America can only dream of ways to make money off of the diseases that exist.  Caring too much about humanity comes with a price and often it is our own health...

Tara

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1306
Joined: Jan 2013

C.C. and Danny... keep on going..!!  OK, so I almost bought a Kidney Cancer T Shirt, but noticed no where on those WEB sites were any proceeds going to help fight Cancer...  I am not rich, and am fighting my own battle.. but I have donated multiple times to what I hope goes towards reasearch etc  (BC and Prostate).   Hopefully research for any one type of Cancer could somehow help all of us..  But I must say I get so many phone calls and plea for $$$ no way can I donate to them all...  I also agree that too many people focus in on the organ(s) that have the Cancer and not on the rest of the person trying to live and go forward..  I chalk that up to ignorance...  same with those that offer miracle cures, etc.

Keep fighting all..!  Be Well All..!!

Ron

sandra4611's picture
sandra4611
Posts: 121
Joined: Sep 2013

Today I was at a craft bazaar where several people were selling "pink ribbon" merchandise. One table was manned by a young couple representing their son's sports team. They were selling water bottles and had a sign saying purchaes would help the team fight breast cancer. I had to ask how. They were shocked and said no one had ever asked them that before. They were proud to say they donated 20% to Susan G Komen. I asked if that 20% was after they deducted the cost of the water bottles, supplies to decorate them, and the booth rental fee. They admitted that it was after, and that it would end up being a token amount, maybe $10 or $20. I asked if they knew what Komen would do with their little check and they said they didn't know but they were sure it would help fight breast cancer. (sigh) 

 

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1306
Joined: Jan 2013

Educating Neanderthals..  Yes, I do thank all of you for giving me an education and perspective.  I was amazed to see a BC thread on a mostly male motorcycle forum I read.  I suspect not many of you watch pro football... but they are doing their "pink" schtick.. (so where is the money..??).  I took the time to try and educate the guys, based on your comments..  Sometimes we "guys" need a good smack on the head to gain understanding...

FYI, I have now spent two different days in the Infusion ward... I saw lots of women fighting without even a whimper.. hope the drugs helps them and gives them lots of time on their clocks..!!

Bless you all... you DO count..!  Oh and thanks for the education..

Ron

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Ron, you are most certainly not in the Neanderthal group.  And, BTW, I have personally experienced as many women being insensitive as men!

My feelings are just my feelings and I am going through a rough patch having experienced bone, lung and liver metastases, so I may be grumpy.  I am so very grateful for the true support and glad there is a pink month.  Thank you so much for your comments and your caring. Laughing

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1306
Joined: Jan 2013

Ah CC with what you are going through... geesh.. only grumpy..?  Yes men do not have the market cornered on insensitivity..  But what you likely do not know about me.. is that I strongly believe that one must be able to poke fun at themself in order to poke fun at anyone else.. And trust me there are a few women over on the Kidney board that take great delight in poking fun...   

Oh yes, thanks for the kind words... Now get your stamina in line and keep up the good fight..!  Feel free to give me crap at any time..  We all need an extra ear every now and then...

Lastly, if you look at the one picture of my race bike I posted, you would see that there is this pink helmet decal on the fairing..  I was amazed at the Cancer (not just BC) awareness of the people on this tiny island..  I got Kudos for not wearing a Cancer T Shirt over there... all the folks that know me (and a bunch that don't) know...  and I was amazed at how many people wished me well with no drawn out questions..  On a small island the "word" spreads quickly..  And yes they even had a Relay for Life there..

Be Well All..!!  Keep up the good fight... and remember.. I am demented.. I would not tickle you with a feather.. I would use the whole chicken..!

Ron

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