CSN Login
Members Online: 10

Sugar?

Hooley's picture
Hooley
Posts: 149
Joined: Aug 2012

I hear sugar feeds cancer.   Are there people out there that don't fully cut sugar from diet.  How are results?

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

Sit back and watch the debate (again).

 

Sugar –does not- feed cancer. The cancer cell uses more sugar than an ordinary good cell, because the cancer cell can not take orders from the body/brain to limit it’s uptake of glucose. The cancer cell can be said to “steal” the glucose away from the good cells that need it to survive.

 

Eliminating sugar will  not do a damned thing to fight cancer, but eliminating it –will- starve your good cells that require it for survival and growth.

 

A cancer cell is a good cell that’s been damaged to the point of death, where it can no longer receive instructions from your body/brain for it’s survival. The now defective cell is not expelled from our system by our immune system (for whatever reason) and instead begins to stay alive using the fermentation process. The fermentation process uses glucose for survival and expels lactic acid as it’s waste. Your liver converts lactic acid back to glucose, adding to the supply that the cancer cells (and the rest of your body needs).

 

If/when the cancer cells grow large enough (tumors), more glucose is used by the cancer faster than the glucose can be used by the good cells. The reason for that? The good cells are taking instructions from the brain to only take as much as they require, while the cancer cells receive no instructions; they run rampant and uncontrolled.

 

The bottom line? No-one should eliminate from their diet what is normal for growth and health. Glucose is a normal and natural requirement; sugar substitutes and other products that are “sweeter than  sugar” are -not- normal for our bodies and can be detrimental to what is required for good health.

 

Forget the bologna about "white sugar", but do eat a well rounded diet the way we were intended to.

 

Best wishes,

 

John

renw's picture
renw
Posts: 282
Joined: Jan 2013

There you go again john. Spreading your personal unfounded beliefs. You are really not helping. Look up the scientific studies people and make your own minds up.

Eliminate sugar and normal cells switch to a ketone based metabolism. They will not starve. Most cancers can not use ketone bodies for energy. They can however ferment glutamine as their backup, so the ideal strategy, eliminate Glucose and control glutamine levels at the same time.

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1202
Joined: Oct 2010

No one is debating about Glucose, the debate is about sucrose. 

 

Best Always,  mike

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1202
Joined: Oct 2010

How many articles and different research studies does one need to read?   http://www.naturalnews.com/041232_cancer_cells_processed_sugar_research.html

 

Sugar is bad for us!  I think there is a valid argument that over use of sugar can and does feed any digestive system cancer.

 

Best Always,  mike

PS  I am going to see a TCM Doctor in two weeks.  

Lovekitties's picture
Lovekitties
Posts: 2900
Joined: Jan 2010

There are those who will eliminate all sugars, including those in fruits and veggies.

There are those who only eliminate refined sugars and things made with them.

Then there are those who don't worry about sugar which one would normally consume.on a healthy diet.

Yes, cancer cells have a higher uptake of sugar than other cells.  That however does not mean that you will "starve" those cells if you eliminate sugar.

An excess of anything is not good.

Marie who loves kitties

lp1964's picture
lp1964
Posts: 839
Joined: Jun 2013

...we eat way too much sugar and products that turn into sugar very fast like white flour and anything that's made from it. Large segment of the population is overweight with all its consequences. Can low sugar diet help to fight cancer? I don't know. But low sugar diet is good for you, that's for sure.

Laz

manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

Cancer is not a collection of unrelated diseases that each need to be treated individually, cancer is one disease—a mitochondrial disease—and diseased mitochondria prefer glucose and glutamine for fuel.  Healthy cells with healthy mitochondria are flexible and can adapt to just about any fuel source, but not cancer cells.  In fact, the majority of cells in our body function best when they burn fat for energy.  Cancer cells are bad at burning fat, because fat burning requires respiration, which requires healthy mitochondria.” Dr Thomas Seyfried

Dr. David Servan-Schreiber MD, PhD, writes in regards to sugar, “when we eat sugar, or white flour, or foods with a high ‘glycemic index’, the blood levels of glucose rise rapidly.  The body immediately releases a dose of insulin to enable the glucose to enter the cells.  The secretion of insulin is accompanied by the release of another molecule, called IGF (insulin-like growth factor), whose role it is to stimulate cell growth. He writes that “insulin and IGF not only stimulate the growth of cancer cells, but also their capacity to invade neighboring tissues.”  Furthermore, insulin and IGF have another effect: “They promote the factors of inflammation, which also stimulates cell growth, and acts in turn as fertilizer for tumors.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaDt3AJQ98c

coloCan
Posts: 1842
Joined: Oct 2009
annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2184
Joined: Oct 2011

being cured by the removal of all sugar from their diet.  And I mean cured, as in "visible tumors - all sugar=tumors disappear and don't return".  I really don't need to hear any more anecdotes about people who had surgery, had all tumors removed, and then, having reached NED via surgical means, claim that it was diet that did the trick.  I personally am an anecdote that suggests the opposite...multiple surgeries to remove cancer, no effective chemo, no dramatic dietary changes (pretty healthy diet to begin with, but I eat sugar in moderation, and drink gin on a weekly basis...figured it worked for the Queen Mum), and here I am.  NED for 20 months.  Maybe a weekly application of martinis is the answer?

Anyway, I think you can do whatever you want when it somes to diet. It probably isn't going to hurt one way or another (except possibly to make one feel more miserable than one already does).

Cheers~AA

ETA that I just read Steve/Colocan's study...again, research involving fruit flies is interesting, but there is a ton of research out there that falls into that category, and is never proven to have any bearing in reality.  In fact, if you want to read an eye-opening article on scientific research, and how the "law of diminishing returns" applies to virtually every study ever done, you might want to read "The Truth Wears Off".http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/12/13/101213fa_fact_lehrer

Nana b's picture
Nana b
Posts: 2765
Joined: May 2009

Sugar may not feed cancer, but Cancer sure makes you want it!     I will sitck with very limited sugar  I don't eat sweets so that s a plus and I dont drink soda, so that is another plus.   If it's in the fruit great, but I won't give in to temptaions, it's not good for me, period! 

 

 

History, prior to Cancer I never had sugar in the house, I would not even eat my birthday cake.  Ice cream was a one time a year thing at Baskin Robbins.  After Cancer, I had bowls of M&Ms next to me, and I was baking peach cobbler, banana bread, eating ice cream, then I said, "what the hell."  I stopped.

 

 

coloCan
Posts: 1842
Joined: Oct 2009
manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

Hi Ann, I can provide links to show patients cured of 'incurable' brain tumours by a no sugar ketogenic diet, and also various metatastic advanced cancers stabalised by low carb/sugar diet or even genes changed by diet, but I'm not as I have done so many times already, really the evidence is 'low' 'more research needed' etc....

This is a personal choice, and people should do there own research and make an educated decision.

Excellent article BTW.

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2184
Joined: Oct 2011

I am very much a "science has all the answers (or will have)" kind of person, and that article really knocked me back.  I had no idea that replication of research was so difficult.  I really give the side-eye to every study I see nowadays...

manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

But I did read a while back that many studies can't be replicated or get conflicting data, which is worrying for the empirical system, I'm also finding that a lot of things I took for granted as true aren't.

Thanks to QI http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwdcGhPTkhA

gfpiv
Posts: 48
Joined: Apr 2010

So I'll try to make this short and sweet (sorry, bad pun):

Cutting down a little on your sugar intake - not to mention processed foods and red meat - will NOT have a bad effect on your health.  And it just MIGHT help, based on what I consider a mountain of evidence.  I'm not suggesting going crazy with diet changes, but just eating a little more healthy - especially since, as cancer survivors, we need to boost our health and immune system with good foods.  In addition, getting a little more moderate exercise is a good idea for us, for many reasons (including controlling blood sugar).

I will also say that way too many people oversimplify the debate to "sugar feeds cancer".  I highly recommend the conversation shift towards minimizing SPIKES in blood sugar - because these are what causes the body to release insulin and IGF-1 which DO feed cancer (and yes, other cells too).  P.S. manwithnoname thanks for mentioning this in your response above.

kennyt's picture
kennyt
Posts: 109
Joined: Jun 2013

eliminate sugar completely it is in everything

lp1964's picture
lp1964
Posts: 839
Joined: Jun 2013

Yes the body can make sugar almost everything: fat, protein, carbohydrates, nails, paper lol. More of the reason you don't want to much straight up sugar (glucose) in your diet. Gradually decrease the sugar you put in your coffee, tee, cut out every thing that has corn syrup in it. Everything that's made of white flour ( pastry, white bread, pasta) turns into sugar in a second. Whole wheat too, but slower. Desserts, chocolate, candy, ice cream, sodas: pure sugar. Dark-dark chocolate is good for you.

Regardless of healthy or sick, we consume ten times more sugar than we should.

Laz

Maxiecat's picture
Maxiecat
Posts: 524
Joined: Jul 2012

I have cut down on the amount of sugar in my diet.  Has it helped...I have no idea if it has or font.  I am eating more healthy now after the cancer...maybe that has something to do with getting to NED.  I must say, I do feel better...and I am getting a little skinnier.  Do I still eat foods with sugar... Yes...you can't pry that bowl of pistachio ice cream out of my hands!  But am I more careful about what I put in my body now...yes I am...but I am not going to extremes...I guesis the key is in moderation.

alex

Coloncancerblows's picture
Coloncancerblows
Posts: 296
Joined: Feb 2013

I thought the same thing about sugar.  I'm not a big sweets person but after every chemo session, I would crave all kinds of sweets.  I told my onc about this and he told me to eat whatever I wanted.  Now that I'm done with the chemo, the cravings for sweets has mostly gone away. 

janderson1964
Posts: 1531
Joined: Oct 2011

Typical oncologist answer.

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 229
Joined: Feb 2012

It infuriates me hear doctors tell patients diet doesn't matter or shrug it off.  During my wife's illness, and now mine, I found quite a lot of research which points to the benefits of a good diet (and moderate exercise).  The typical doctor, whether oncologist or not, is not trained in nutirtion, and generally has at best little more knowledge in this area than a layman.  

 

any physicians who lends the authority of their professional position to the notion that diet does not matter should have their license to practice revoked!!   

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1202
Joined: Oct 2010

Most Docotrs and most research believe that sugar adds to the growth of all of the diegestive system cancers.   We cut out all processed white sugar and use a little molasses or honey when we want something sweet. Obviously they are sugars, but they are less processed and easier to digest. 

 

I stopped all processed foods in our diet. This helped my health a lot. 

 

Best Always,  mike

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

Sugar Cane

Cane stalks are shredded and squeezed to extract it natural juice, which is boiled until it thickens and molasses-rich sugar crystals begin to settle. The molasses-rich crystals are sent to a rapidly spinning centrifuge to remove molasses and leave pure naturally white sugar crystals. The sugar crystals are then dried. It is important to note that cane sugar is neither chemically altered nor bleached to achieve its naturally white color.

Sugar is a carbohydrate. The body's primary source of energy is from carbohydrates. All vital organs – brain, heart, liver – need carbohydrates to meet their energy demands. Carbohydrates, including sugar, also play key roles in muscle function, growth and regulation of body temperature.

Sugar Beets

After washing, sugar beets are sliced and soaked in hot water to begin the process that separates sugar from the rest of the plant. The hot sugary liquid is filtered, concentrated to a deep brown syrup, whose color is due to its high molasses content. The molasses – rich syrup is allowed to cool slightly before it is whirled in a centrifuge – a large perforated basket spinning very rapidly much like a washing machine in the spin cycle – where most of the molasses is spun away. At the end, hot water is sprayed over the light brown crystals to remove the remaining molasses, leaving pure naturally white sugar crystals. The sugar crystals are then dried. It is important to note that beet sugar is neither chemically altered nor bleached to achieve its naturally white color.

(Read more at:

http://www.sugar.org/sugar-basics/how-we-get-sugar.html)

It’s interesting how many seem to believe the food industry’s hyperbole regarding “sugar”. The environmentalist’s hate the farming, and the industry seeks a less expensive substance, while health freaks insist that we all should “watch our weight” and use sugar substitutes to lessen our calorie intake....

Our body knows how to react to natural substances and has trouble with “man-made” garbage. Trying to fool mom nature by eating things like “stavia” that will trick the body into  thinking it’s getting a ton of sugar when it isn’t, only causes spikes in insulin production when it’s not needed. And we wonder why diabetes is on the rise?

Common sense should prevail. Sugar isn’t the “cause” of any malady, and it isn’t “processed” as your tasty frozen healthy chosen TV dinners are.......

We really oughta’ get a grip....

(just  sayin’)

Best wishes,

John

 

renw's picture
renw
Posts: 282
Joined: Jan 2013

Sugar is a carbohydrate. The body's primary source of energy is from carbohydrates. All vital organs – brain, heart, liver – need carbohydrates to meet their energy demands. Carbohydrates, including sugar, also play key roles in muscle function, growth and regulation of body temperature.

True BUT: You are again leaving out an important part of the metabolic process. When there are little or no carbohydrates, ALL vital organs including the brain switch to a ketone based metabolism. Once in ketosis, your body no longer needs glucose and ketone bodies become the primary source of energy. Normal cells can quite happily function without glucose. Cancer cells on the other hand have a very hard time surviving without it.

Think about the implications.

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

 

Some helpful links?

 

Our results suggest that the fate of normal human cells should be considered in evaluating nutrient deprivation as a strategy for cancer therapy

The Journal of Cell Biology

http://jcb.rupress.org/content/178/1/93.full

 

 

Cancer cells need food to survive and grow. They're very good at getting it, too, even when nutrients are scarce. Many scientists have tried killing cancer cells by taking away their favorite food, a sugar called glucose. Unfortunately, this treatment approach not only fails to work, it backfires -- glucose-starved tumors actually get more aggressive.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130131144427.htm

 

 

Here, we found that depletion of glucose killed normal human cells irrespective of induced MYC activity and by a mechanism different from apoptosis.

http://jcb.rupress.org/content/178/1/93.full

 

 

To move to Ketogenic survival; to force the body to survive on ketone rather than it’s natural survival means, is to stress the body needlessly.

 

And to what gain? The cancer cells will again form, since the body’s immune system will again neglect to remove the damaged cells that survive by the fermentation process.

 

Temporary fixes are fine, if there’s an ulterior motive to follow. The body will not survive for too long while it’s dependent on surviving in it’s emergency state. We need glucose to survive naturally.

 

This topic has been hashed and re-hashed. Even with proof of this theory’s failure, it manages to continue being broadcast to those that are in fear of dying.

 

I guess it may be time to go the “juicing gals” route….. quit trying to fight windmills and put away the Don Quixote gear….

 

Good luck with whatever you’re  doing. I truly hope you have as much success with your choice as I have had with mine so far.

 

(always subject to change, however)

 

 

Be well,

 

John

 

 

manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

PREFACE

One morning at breakfast, the autumn of 1955, my explorer-anthropologist husband, Vilhjalmur Stefansson, asked me if he might return to the Stone Age Eskimo sort of all-meat diet he had thrived on during the most active part of his arctic work. Two years before, he had suffered a mild cerebral thrombosis, from which he had practically recovered. But he had not yet succeeded in losing the ten pounds of overweight his doctor wanted him to be rid of. By will power and near starvation, he had now and then lost a few of them; but the pounds always came back when his will power broke down. Doubtless partly through these failures, Stef had grown a bit unhappy, at times grouchy.

My first reaction to his Stone Age diet proposal was dismay. I have three jobs. I lecture, in and out of town, and enjoy the innumerable extracurricular activities of our New England college town of Hanover, New Hampshire. Forenoons I write books about the arctic, "for teen-agers and uninformed adults," to be able to afford the luxury of being librarian afternoons of the large polar library my husband and I acquired when we were free-lance writers and government contractors, which library now belongs to Dartmouth College. I take part in a course called the Arctic Seminar, and last winter was director. I sing in madrigal groups and act in experimental theater plays. Only by a miserly budgeting of time do I manage these things. "In addition," I thought to myself, "I am now supposed to prepare two menus!"

But aloud I said: "Of course, dear." And we began to plan.

To my astonished delight, contrary to all my previous thinking, the Stone Age diet not only proved effective in getting rid of Stef's overweight, but was also cheaper, simpler, and easier to prepare than our regular mixed diet had been. Far from requiring more time, it took less. Instead of adding housekeeping burdens, it relieved them. Almost imperceptibly Stef's diet became my diet. Time was saved in not shopping for, not preparing, not cooking, and not washing up after unrequired dishes, among them vegetables, salads, and desserts.

Some of our friends say: "We would go on a meat diet too, but we couldn't possibly afford it." That started me investigating the actual cost of the diet. Unlike salads and desserts, which often do not keep, meat is as good several days later as the day it was cooked. There is no waste. I found our food bills were lower than they had been. But I attribute this to our fondness for mutton. Fortunately for us it is an unfashionable meat, which means it is cheap. We both like it, and thanks to our deep freeze, we buy fat old sheep at anything from twenty-two to thirty-three cents a pound and proceed to live on the fat of the land. We also buy beef, usually beef marrow. European cooks appreciate marrow, but most people in our country have never even tasted it, poor things.

When you eat as a primitive Eskimo does, you live on lean and fat meats. A typical Stefansson dinner is a rare or medium sirloin steak and coffee. The coffee is freshly ground. If there is enough fat on the steak we take our coffee black, otherwise heavy cream is added. Sometimes we have a bottle of wine. We have no bread, no starchy vegetables, no desserts. Rather often we eat half a grapefruit. We eat eggs for breakfast, two for Stef, one for me, with lots of butter.

Startling improvements in health came to Stef after several weeks on the new diet. He began to lose his overweight almost at once, and lost steadily, eating as much as he pleased and feeling satisfied the while. He lost seventeen pounds, then his weight remained stationary, although the amount he ate was the same. From being slightly irritable and depressed, he became once more his old ebullient, optimistic self. By eating mutton he became a lamb.

An unlooked-for and remarkable change was the disappearance of his arthritis, which had troubled him for years and which he thought of as a natural result of aging. One of his knees was so stiff he walked up and down stairs a step at a time, and he always sat on the aisle in a theater so he could extend his stiff leg comfortably.

Several times a night he would be awakened by pain in his hips and shoulder when he lay too long on one side; then he had to turn over and lie on the other side. Without noticing the change at first, Stef was one day startled to find himself walking up and down stairs, using both legs equally. He stopped in the middle of our stairs; then walked down again and up again. He could not remember which knee had been stiff!

Conclusion: The Stone Age all-meat diet is wholesome. It is an eat-all-you-want reducing diet that permits you to forget you are dieting--no hunger pangs remind you. It saves time and money. Best of all, it improves the temperament. It somehow makes one feel optimistic, mildly euphoric.

Epilogue: Stef used to love his role of being a thorn in the flesh of nutritionists. But in 1957 an article appeared in the august journal of the American Medical Association confirming what Stef had known for years from his anthropology and his own experience. The author of this book has also popularized Stef's diet in England, with the blessing of staid British medical folk.

Was it with the faintest trace of disappointment in his voice that Stef turned to me, after a strenuous nutrition discussion, and said: "I have always been right. But now I am becoming orthodox! I shall have to find myself a new heresy."

Evelyn Stefansson

*NOTE* back then animals were grass fed.

lp1964's picture
lp1964
Posts: 839
Joined: Jun 2013

...and interesting story. I'm glad that both of you have been experiencing these benefits. 

If I may, I'd like to add my thoughts to it.

Many of us are astonished that in some parts of the world, that are usually isolated from the rest by water, distance, terrain or elevation people live long, healthy happy lives in great numbers. Some eat seaweeds and fish (Okinawa), some veggies and lot of olive oil (Greek islands, some nothing but meat and fat (Eskimos) or whatever grows (high mountain communities), not by knowledge or design, but simply that is what was available to them. What makes these peoples healthy is not the type of diet they are on, but the fact that their life is isolated, tranquil with little stress and environmental damage and strong sense of family and community. That's what they have over the rest of the world, not their special diet.Their life was plagued by other illnesses: early childhood deaths, infectious diseases, food poisoning, frequent violance etc.

In a modern society we have many choices: all meat and fat, vegan, organic, processed, vegetarian, raw vegan, anything goes. With options come responsibility, experimentation and passing on the knowledge.

Laz

 

Laz

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

As an Alaskan Native (my grandmother was full blooded) I was raised in Alaska on that diet, moose, caribou, fowl, etc., which by the way includes lots and lots of seafood.

Alaskan Natives have the highest colonrectal rate per capita of all races.  I don't recommend our "healthy" diet.

Winter Marie

manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

discussion already, I asked for proof of that statement and you couldn't provide it.

 

"Field physicians in the arctic noted that the Inuit were a remarkably healthy people. While they suffered from a tragic susceptibility to European communicable diseases, they did not develop the chronic diseases we now view as part of being human: tooth decay, overweight, heart attacks, appendicitis, constipation, diabetes and cancer. When word reached American and European physicians that the Inuit did not develop cancer, a number of them decided to mount an active search for it. This search began in the 1850s and tapered off in the 1920s, as traditionally-living Inuit became difficult to find. 

One of these physicians was captain George B. Leavitt. He actively searched for cancer among the traditionally-living Inuit from 1885 to 1907. Along with his staff, he claims to have performed tens of thousands of examinations. He did not find a single case of cancer. At the same time, he was regularly diagnosing cancers among the crews of whaling ships and other Westernized populations. It's important to note two relevant facts about Inuit culture: first, their habit of going shirtless indoors. This would make visual inspection for external cancers very easy. Second, the Inuit generally had great faith in Western doctors and would consult them even for minor problems. Therefore, doctors in the arctic had ample opportunity to inspect them for cancer."

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.co.il/2008/07/cancer-among-inuit.html


"UK researchers found that vegetarians had a lower overall cancer rate than meat eaters, but contrary to suggestions from other studies, they found a higher rate of colorectal cancer among the vegetarians than among the meat eaters."


http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/142427.php

 

https://www.itk.ca/sites/default/files/private/factsheet-seriesFINAL2.pdf     Actual documented cancer studies on Inuit which show most die from lung cancer.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

But here you go:

http://www.anthc.org/chs/epicenter/upload/CRCSP_ANMC_brochure.pdf

That's from our Alaskan Native hospital in Anchorage, if you google you will find much more on it. 

This brochure actually says "and Alaska Natives almost twice as much as the general population"

in getting colorectal cancer.  Just google a bit more and you will see more of the same, from the cancer society

 etc, yes they

still do NOT eat the carbs others do, we still ate the way of the elders, no sweets, our milk 

consisted of powdered MilkMan milk, wild fruit gotten off the land, same for greens.  You

may like to tell me how we ate, but I lived it.  

When you actually live that life and see what we ate then you get to give me informed facts, I

lived it, many still live it, even some city dwellers and by the way not many of us believe white

men from those era's, plenty of lies and plenty of false tales,(especially in the 1800 and early 1900's)

when the priests came and children were taken away, women held hostage so the men would

go fur hunting for the Russians, diseases brought  by them killing off our peoples, along with the raping

of the women and children and the shooting deaths of our men.

My mother, my grandmother, my aunt's and uncles and other of our people were sitting in

"native only" sections in the back top of theaters, and not allowed in many stores or shops 

"no natives, no dogs" were the motto's in many businesses even until the late. 50's and 60's my

birth mother sent to Holy Cross, not allowed to speak her language, our people interned and taken

from their islands during World War II.

Our  people have been treated poorly since the Russians invaded our land and when the U.S. took

over from the Russians. I'm sure the Inuits trusted the "whites". (Sarcasm there). And various tribes

the Tlingits,, Aleuts, Eskimos, and many other, have diets varying from each other depending on the 

region they live in, Artic, Aluetian Islands, Southeastern, etc., all regions are different.  For instance my people

didnt hunt whales and eat blubber or use seal oil for eating fish but other Northern regions do.

and yes it sucks to be in the highest rate of colorectal cancer race, but unfortunately that's  the

truth, and you can keep saying it isn't so, but the facts prove we are,  again unfortunately we as a

race have the highest chance of getting colorectal cancer, again unfortunately.

And that's the history lesson for today.

Winter Marie

 

 

manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

but lets not drag that thread up.

you said "Alaskan Natives have the highest colonrectal rate per capita of all races"

You show a health brochure that says they have a higher level than Canadians 

And actualy the rate only increased after 1989.

"The ranking of cancer incidence was different in Inuit Nunangat compared to the rest of Canada (19). For example, following lung cancer, cancers of the prostate and breast were the most frequent cancers for the population in the rest of Canada, whereas these cancers ranked third behind lung and colorectal cancers in Inuit Nunangat. Our results did show that residents of Inuit Nunangat were at substantially elevated risk for cancers that tend to become more prevalent in economically developing countries (20) specifically lung, bronchus, and colorectal cancers compared to the rest of Canada. Incidence and mortality for these cancers have been attributed to changes in population health behaviours including increased smoking, changes to dietary patterns and less physical activity (20). Smoking and diet are important risk factors for many types of cancers"

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3417551/?report=classic

It's also interesting that colorectal rocketed at 1989 after being very steady, what happened in 1989?

Proof here; https://www.itk.ca/sites/default/files/private/factsheet-seriesFINAL2.pdf

 

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

 

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

And I'm talking about Alaska Natives, we're UNITED STATES, not Canada.  The area code in the brochure is an Alaska area code, the SouthCentral Foundation is part of the Alaska Native health care system in Alaska.  It says general population not races in this brochure, but I'll let you spend your time googling, there is much more out there that shows the Alaska Native (again Natives from Alaska which is in the USA)  have the highest colorectal rates per capita of their Race then other general population (just added the "other population" part to be more specific as I noticed I hadn't done that on this one) This isn't a statistic that I enjoy stating, it's sad for my people, it sucks, I'm now done with this thread.

Winter Marie

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

 

renw's picture
renw
Posts: 282
Joined: Jan 2013

1989? Didn't McDonalds open up a chain of restaurants in Alaska that year? :)

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

Your ignorance is showing.

renw's picture
renw
Posts: 282
Joined: Jan 2013

Then you have no sense for humour.

renw's picture
renw
Posts: 282
Joined: Jan 2013

Then you have no sense for humour.

seanman's picture
seanman
Posts: 7
Joined: Aug 2013

I thouhgt it was quite funny!

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

This debacle is why some of us gave up and left. You can't tell "them" anything; they don't hear as well as they talk.

Catch you on the PM side, Marie... good luck here!

John

 

manwithnoname
Posts: 390
Joined: Jun 2012

really what's the use, opinon and anecdotes against facts...last time I bother replying to either of you.Laughing

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

I wonder how well their little camera scopes worked doing colonoscopies in the 1800's as they searched for colon cancer.  Oh wait, it HAD'NT been invented yet. But I'm sure with their shirts off the doctors of that era could tell just by that.

Winter Marie

 

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

So i have been on ultra low carb since march, I feel healthy as i have ever felt, doing another tace on tuesday and a scan. 

actually today i had a record keytone bodies 2.4 i was stoked. I even had a frozen yogurt with berries and a glass of red, all permitted on an mct ketogenic diet.

its all on my blog.

what you got to loose if you ditch sugar, and go paleo ? a few kilograms.

maybe an extremely deadly illness needs an extreme response, so far i am alive and well, broke and living in the black forest.

time will tell.

as for the science, read about candida and the gut and pathogenic bacteria, where do you think our immune system comes from ?

not out butts ! but further up, the correct balance of bacteria on entrocytes is needed for lymphocytes.

hugs,

pete

ps thanks tony the raw organic liver maybe working 25% white blood cell boost in a week

pps get real swap sugar for raw liver and see how your health improves, try it for a year and see.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU_0BwbNsH4 bruce lipton about cell biology and hope

http://petertrayhurn.blogspot.de/2013/08/im-grateful-and-joyful-and-my-friend-is.html

the first few links my favourite ketogenic video and reference and some discussion about glutamine depletion

ppps i have an excellent ketogenic reference book for cancer patients, pm me if you want to read it

Bluejuniata's picture
Bluejuniata
Posts: 20
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi, Pete,

I'm on a ketogenic diet and was wondering if you could tell me about your book? I am intrigued by the yogurt, blueberries and red wine! Actually, I'm allergic o dairy so it makes things a bit more challenging. I am going to read your blog. Thanks so much for any and all help. Susan.

rlridings's picture
rlridings
Posts: 43
Joined: Nov 2011

elaine cantin wrote a book w a keotgenic diet routine and she cuts out all dairy - so you might want to check on tit

lp1964's picture
lp1964
Posts: 839
Joined: Jun 2013

Fresh dairy products like milk, half and half, cream has lactose (a type of sugar) that is converted into glucose in our body in five minutes. Products made out of milk like cheese, yoghurt should be ok, because the fermentation broke down all the lactose. These products provide you with protein, fat and healthy bacteria.

Laz

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

dear susan,

congratulations on trying the ketogenic diet, besides Ren I think you are the first colorectal besides me to have a go at this challenging diet on this forrum tht i am aware of. the diet has got lots of challenges.

I will help you however i can, i think supprt essential. this diet may not suit anyone or everyone, then again it may really help some, I enjoy it and am well.

my argument is if you do your homework and research and want to try it, then do it really well ie blood keytones >2.0 and glucose < 4.

You have made my day and restored my faith that desperate times demand desperate measurers. this approach suits some, its suits me.

I hope that your ketogenic adventure exceeds my own, so far i have excellent health, except today with diarrhea and pain as the after effects of my 7th liver operation, ok its a minor op with large benefits and a few risk and unpleasant side effects.

, i have benefited so far from the diet in many many ways.

just pm me and i will email a link to the book, dont tell anyone but its supposed to be purchased, if you like it alot, then buy it, until then enjoy.

I have read and purchased almost every book on ketogeni diet and exercise nutrition and cancer in my effort to be well despite a few misguided cells.

I have good news that i will post about soon as i have a report from my doctor about tace 7. 

I enjoy the challenge of the ketogenic diet, 

http://www.carbs-information.com/gluconeogenesis.htm i find our biology compelling, that i am being successful and healthy despite our curse my greatest achievement, this link, to do the ketogenic diet really well, you need to be a rocket scientist or have a really good diet, lots of pitfalls depending on your therapy choices.

my blood keytones this morning were 0.7, tonight after mainly fasting 0.9, i was expecting better, but i am patient with my biology, it could have been worse.

knowledge is power, the lack of knowledge is lack of power, so being really well informed about your lifestyle choices improves your faith and confidence. with faith we can move mountains. i have faith in all my therapies, especially the ketogenic diet.

maybe faith is the key! then again it could be the prayers, the ketogenic diet, some exercise, a few supplements, meditation, yoga.

hugs,

Rat ( used to known as Pete ) 

ps my next post will be 4000, that will be when i am in remission again and NED.

 

 

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

I had two cans of soda, and a nice helping of pineapple upside down cake today.  Yep, I still have cancer, but that doesn't mean that my soda and occasional sweets is what is doing it.  The way I figure it, I have cancer and I'm going to enjoy life, I haven't baked in ages and last night I baked the cake and yes, I'm enjoying it.  The horse has been out the barn already, no one can say what caused the cancer to pay me a visit and know one knows how to get rid of it completely from this world.  So I'm just going to enjoy the ride as best I can which means I'm going to eat steak or whatever else I have an enjoyment of.  And milk, I drink at least two large glasses of Vitamin D milk a day, then again I dont have low levels of vitamin D. As for the debate, to each his own.

Winter Marie

lp1964's picture
lp1964
Posts: 839
Joined: Jun 2013

The average person, healthy or sick, consumes many times the healthy amount of carbohydrates in the last few decades and we see the results: obesity, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, heart disease and other degenerative diseases. No matter how common it became recently, it's not normal to have pastry with sugared up coffee or sweet cerial for breakfest, pasta for lunch with sweet ice tea and stake with starchy potatoes for dinner and dessert. Through in some chocolate, candy bar, cookies, sodas for snack and you have got a problem.

I believe that both cancer and healthy cells will get the glucose they need since our body can make glucose out of anything, fat, protein, probaly even from Folfox lol.

Cancer no cancer it makes sense to reduce your carbo intake to the minimum.

Laz

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3390
Joined: Apr 2010

I think most of us don't eat as much sweets as you showed above, I myself drink coffee black.  That being said lot of carbohydrates come from eating processed bread in our daily habits, I myself don't eat bread because I simply don't care for it.  

Again, cancer is going to kill me some day, be it next year or ten years down the road, and I am going to enjoy myself whether it be food, flying a Cessna (I could die in an airplane crash) going to DisneyWorld (I could fall off a ride and die), skiing (I could hit a tree and die), motorcycle riding (I could crash and die)etc., for me, now is not a time to limit things I enjoy unless it hurts someone else or me, sweets are not going to do that in the foreseeable future.  

Winter Marie

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network