CSN Login
Members Online: 10

Ovarian Cancer - Please help

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

My wife got diagnosed with an ovarian cancer. Please help me with dos and don;ts. Kindly help me as parallel to chemo what treatment should I follow.

 

As per doctors here, this is an advance stage 3.

I am scared with this word "cancer" request all survivors to kindly guide me. 

 

lovesanimals's picture
lovesanimals
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sep 2011

You've come to the right place for support.  The women here are wonderful and caring.  I can truly understand you and your wife's fear and shock with the "cancer" diagnosis.  There are many women here who were diagnosed at stage 3 and are long-term survivors.  Believe me, your wife has every reason to be very hopeful about the future.  Has your wife already had surgery?  If not, she needs to get herself a gynocological oncologist surgeon.  Her doctors (oncologist) should have a game plan in place that will address her particular situation, including the chemo treatment.  Before chemo begins, the oncologist should arrange for your wife to meet with a chemo nurse or some other medical expert who will explain in detail the possible side effects and how to deal with them.  If you tell us the name(s) of her chemo drug(s), ladies on this board will probably be able to share with you their experiences with potential side effects.  Be wary of what you read about ovarian cancer on the internet.  Much of the information is outdated and does not take into account each woman's unique set of circumstances.

Please come back often to let us know how you and your wife are doing.  Perhaps your wife herself will want to come here when/if she feels up to it.

Sending lots of good wishes and prayers to you and your wife.

Kelly

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Kelly - Yes surgery done. now we are looking for a best medical oncologist to start chemo. may be we would start chemo in next 2 weeks time till then she would recover from curgery also. 

 

Would surely share the namae/drug of chemo. 

 

Tanks indeed for your wishes and prayers. 

 

Danny 

Pamela B's picture
Pamela B
Posts: 108
Joined: Jan 2013

Speaking from recent experience (diagnosed with Stage  3C in December) I was overwhelmed and scared.  But the wonderful ladies on this board answered every question, even the silly ones, walked me through the process, and told me exactly what to expect.  It took all of the fear of the unknown out of it for me.  They gave me resources and information that I could take to my doctors and have informed discussions.  I don't think I would be as well off as I am now it it were not for the support of this board.  Looking forward to hearing about your wife's travels through the maze of cancer.  We will be here to help.

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Yes - i can see people are very helpful here. 

 

Thanks indeed. Keep helping. 

 

Danny 

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

I'm sorry to hear that your wife had this diagnosis.  She really has a choice.  She can follow only the advice of her doctors, or she can be proactive and take an integrative approach.  I took the second choice and am 3 1/2 years in remission (NED), despite my suboptimal debulking (after a diagnosis of stage IIIc, very aggressive ovarian cancer) and my doctor's prognosis that I would not live beyond a year.  I've learned a lot about the body and what actually causes cancer through seeing a naturopath, who herself is a 21 year survivor of stage IV ovarian cancer.  It just makes sense to me that a healthy body does not grow cancer.  So there are imbalances and malfunctions present even before the cancer grows.  Thankfully my naturopath has identifed my body's weaknesses and we work dilligently to keep it working properly with diet, supplements, exercise and stress management.  My best advice to you would be to find a practitioner who takes an integrative approach, to augment your wife's treatments and to, prehaps, make them more effective.  I hope all goes well for her. 

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Dear Tethys41,

Thanks indeed, can you please tell me more about yourintegrative approach. what all suppliments you took and who is your naturopath?

can we also contact them ?

 

Danny 

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

Danny,

I've sent you a private message.

Loewenhart
Posts: 26
Joined: Nov 2013

Hello

I also have advanced aggressive Cervial cancer and waiting word on a possible clinical trial. I'm interested in usinging an integrative approach. How do you find a good naturopath? 

Thanks for any advice

Alexandra's picture
Alexandra
Posts: 1210
Joined: Jul 2012

Mo, Tethys is no longer on this board.

Naturopath she was going to is Dr. Nasha Winters, The Namaste Health Center, 1800 E. 3rd Ave., Ste 112, Durango CO 81301, 970.247.2043, namastehealthcenter.com.

 

In GTA check out Dr. Ahmad Nasri, Nasri Functional Medicine Clinic, www.nasriclinic.com, info@nasriclinic.com

7611 Pine Valley Drive, Unit #7, Woodbridge ON L4L0A2, (905) 266-0959

730 Essa Rd., Barrie ON L4N9E9, (705) 735-2354

I had a consultation with Dr. Nasri once ($180), was not particularly impressed with his credentials and decided not to proceed.

But maybe you will feel differently.

mopar
Posts: 1950
Joined: May 2003

I'm so sorry to hear about your wife's diagnosis.  It's wonderful that you are being proactive in her journey, as we need all the support we can get.  As everyone has already said, this discussion board carries a wealth of support, info and might I add, HUGS.  Let us know what your wife's oncologist is going to recommend.  Then we can be more specific with our suggestions.

In the meantime, I will be praying for you, your wife, and your family.  There is much hope, many reasons to be positive and uplifted, as you will see the more you visit here.  Please encourage your wife to take a look also.  She may find it very therapeutic to 'vent' her feelings.  If anyone understands, we sure do.

(((HUGS)))

Monika

 

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Thanks indeed monika for help, wishes and prayer. 

We have got surgery done and would start chemo in next 2 to 3 weeks time once she recovers form surgery. 

Would surely share what oncologist is recommending. 

 

Danny 

Glad to be done's picture
Glad to be done
Posts: 558
Joined: Jul 2012

Hi danny and welcome.  First  let me say a cancer diagnosis is not a death sentence.    Please remember that.  Second.  Don't believe everything you read on the internet and try not to search statistics.  Every case is different.

I was diagnosed January 2012 with stage 3c after my hysterectomy.   3 weeks after that surgery I was back in having an intraperitoneal  port put in.  That is a port in the abdomen for chemo.  Three weeks after that I started chemo. 6 rounds of cisplatin/ttaxol.  If and IP (abdominal).  I finished June 25th and just celebrated one year cancer free last month.

 

Encourage your wife to join us.  It truly helps to chat with ladies who know exactly what she is going through.  This is a helpful, caring bunch and we are all here to help each other.  I was so happy when I found this wonderful group of ladies.

 

Good luck and please come back with any questions you may have.

 

Eileen

 

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Thanks for sharing your experience, the case is almost the same as my wife's case. 

It gives me confidence now. 

Thanks once again. 

 

Danny 

123Miley's picture
123Miley
Posts: 94
Joined: Jan 2013

I am a little late to the party on this one - but still wanted to chime in.  I was diagnosed with Stage 3C ovarian cancer 6 years ago this month.

Medically there are a few different options - usually surgery (hysteroctomy and any other "ectomy" that is required - I also had my appendix and part of my colon removed -  and debulking) then chemo.  Usually first line drugs are carboplatin and or cisplatin combined with taxol.  I trust you have a good gynecological oncologist on board. He will help guide you through any decisions you and your wife have to make.  But be sure to read and seek out any information you can that will help you to make better and more informed decisions - or that will just reinforce that you are doing the right thing.   

Be careful on the internet.  Not sure wher you live but I would suggest you try to stick to reliable sites like the American Cancer Society, Mayo Clinic or MD Anderson and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.  Knowledge is power. But DO NOT let any statistics you read get to you either.  The first and only time I mentioned stats that I had read about to my doctor.  His nurse responded with "Oh we don't discuss statistics in this office"  He said nothing, he simply gave me a stern fatherly look that was in total agreement with what his nurse said.  Best advice I have received so far!    

I won't surgar coat it - this is a devistating and life altering thing.  However it is not the end of the world either.  As I have said many times before on this board:  There is life after AND WITH cancer!  

As worried as you are about your wife - chances are she is at least as worried about you.   Most of the time my husband and I have  sort of been able to take turns if you will.  When I was weak he was strong and visa versa.  But sometimes we were both blibbering balling idiots together - the key word there being "together".  

Cancer is a very scary word - but believe it or not it will get a little less scary as things progress.  I am 6 years in and although I have had a few - ok more than a few - bumps in the road we are still getting up everyday and doing our thing.  We just got back from a fabulous week long vacation in the mountains.

So much is going through my head because I am so familiar with the impact this has had on my husband and the hurt and helplessness it has caused him.  I can't fix that any more than he can fix me!  It is frustrating for sure. 

Hang in there and just stand by your wife as you go through this journey.  My husband and I have learned a lot and have a bit of an altered perspective on life and what really matters.  An unfortunate way to come about it but ... I believe you have to look for the silver lining where ever you can.  

Please keep us posted.  I hurt so much for my husband and am sure your wife does for you as well.  

 

 

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

thanks indeed miley, yes i also have stopped reading stats on internet. 

we have started chemo form last week, paclitaxel and carboplatin. 

will sure keep posted the updates here. 

thank you very much for writing and its truly motivational for me to be strong. 

 

Regards,

Danny 

pattysoo's picture
pattysoo
Posts: 173
Joined: Oct 2010

The thing that helped me most in finding correct treatment for my cancer was to understand exactly what type of Ovarian Cancer tumors I have. There are a number of different kinds and some respond to different treatments. That being said, I believe most women receive the same chemo as your wife for front line treatment because it statistically has been shown to be effective. In the meantime, see if you can get more precise information about her subtype of cancer and then go to ACS or any other reputable site and google that. It'd be good if you knew if her tumors are hormone receptive or not.

 

Everyone is different in their reponses to medicine and how the disease presents itself. It's good to remember that what one person believes or experiences may not necessarily be the same as your wife's. So take this time during the chemo marathon to do some research...unless you don't want to, of course! 

harleyisme's picture
harleyisme
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2013

Hi I'm sure you're so frightened

I myself was diagnosed with advanced

Stage 3 I've had a few surgery s and chemo

And am in remission its hard and scary but very

Very doable. Well wishes

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Hi - can you please share what all surgerys

 

 

Regards,

 

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

 

Three chemo are over and surgery scheduled .. please pray for her. 

 

 

Alexandra's picture
Alexandra
Posts: 1210
Joined: Jul 2012

You wrote that your wife had surgery in July prior to starting chemo. Was it just exploratory surgery and is she having interval hysterectomy with debulking now?

She has the best chance if the surgery is performed by the experienced GYN-ONC. Right after in the recovery room the surgeon will tell you if it was optimal (no visible cancer over 1 cm left). She will be able to get up and start walking the day after surgery and should be out of the hospital in a few days once her bowels start working, even less time with laproscopic surgery. Pain should be manageble with painkillers. Wearing an abdominal binder helps. Avoid foods that cause gas. Avoid constipation and straining while having BM. Staples come out in 10-11 days. Full recovery takes 6-8 weeks. I was able to drive and go shopping after 2 weeks. No heavy lifting, no reaching, no sudden movements if she doesn't want hernias or to pop the insicion.

They will restart chemo a few weeks after surgery to kill microscopic cancer cells and will do another 3-4 rounds. If they offer her IP (intraperitoneal) chemo - take it.

Best wishes to both of you.

Alexandra 

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

In the monht of july - the surgery was debulking surgery where ovaries, uterus and tumor got removed. Colostomy done, post that 3 chemo are over and now one more surgery for removing of cancer tissues. 

Thanks for sharing your information. 

 

 

CRM's picture
CRM
Posts: 13
Joined: Sep 2013

Hi.  I'm glad she had the debulking.  I'm new to this board and am at a loss when I read that people are living with the tumors that are killing them.  I'm not a doctor but common sense says cutting it all out is the first step to getting rid of it.  I think the ones living with the tumor have a ticking time bomb in side and should seek another medical opinion.

CRM's picture
CRM
Posts: 13
Joined: Sep 2013

I couldn't agree more with the recommendation of binding after surgery.  I was up and around very quickly thanks to binding.  My doctor didn't recommend it, I just did it on my own having used back support in the past.  Only this time, I turned the back support belt around to support my belly and limit gravity from pulling on the surgical spots.  That is what causes the pain and keeps women bedridden.

kimberly sue 63's picture
kimberly sue 63
Posts: 396
Joined: Apr 2012

Be there for her and be her pillar of strength. Cancer is one thing and treatment gives the challenge. Let her know she is not alone, she is beautiful even with losing hair and that she is a fighter and will prevail. For you fill your strength in the support you give to herand know you are needed even if not recognied. Be tough and love! Kim

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Thanks indeed 

CRM's picture
CRM
Posts: 13
Joined: Sep 2013

Hi Danny.  Where to begin?  I was diagnosed at age 52 and am now 54 and cancer free.  There is hope.  Being supportive and loving and communicating about her needs is very important.  I did not want my husband to go with me to chemo appointments for the simple reason that I didn't want to be there either.  Also, it's very depressing to see cancer patients that look like holocaust victims and who are so depressed and weak that they already look dead.  If you go with her, try to find privacy in a corner or private room if it is available.  I think it's a good idea to avoid other patients aside from polite greetings.  During my chemo it quickly became apparent that people like to talk about their cancer illness.  I think talking about it gives it power.  Never make cancer a part of your identity.  Treat it like the life-sucking parasite that it is and focus on killing it.  Encourage your wife to do whatever is recommended to relieve the chemo side effects even if it means eating nothing but cheese or whatever tastes good to her. Chemo leaves an awful taste in the mouth that won't go away and it creates a mediciny body odor.  You will smell it and it will be a part of your life for the duration of her treatment.  My husband and I used to plan getaways after each chemo treatment, mostly to reaffirm LIFE.  If you can do minivacations, keep it simple and relaxing, nothing too ambitious.  She will need beauty, breath and comfort.  We have a hottub and it was fantastic for helping with the after chemo stiffness and soreness and feeling alive again.  Let her rest as much as she wants and snuggle by her when it feels right.  I had a blessed kitty who always napped with me and she was my angel.  Be patient, do most of the cooking and housework and baby her.  Right now she needs compassion and love more than ever.  She is frightened too.

Alexandra's picture
Alexandra
Posts: 1210
Joined: Jul 2012

Congratulations on being cancer-free and sorry you got fired due to cancer. That's not fair.

I suppose everyone's chemo experience is different: throughout my 7 rounds of Taxol / Carboplatin I was never weak or depressed, I never smelt any mediciny BO on myself or any other chemo patients, didn't have any unpleasant taste and never lost appetite. In my opinion socializing with other patients, sharing experiences and attending support groups is helpful; it does not make cancer part of your identity, it makes you a decent human being, conscious to the suffering of others. Being grossed out by other cancer patients' appearance is not something I would discuss on the cancer forum. I also don't see the point of the husband hiding in the corner or private room while the wife is getting chemo; it's cancer, not leprosy. And I can't imagine why anyone would compare chemo patients to "holocaust victims", but I am Jewish and may be oversensitive.

Good luck to you, your husband, your son and your blessed kitty.

Alexandra

ConnieSW's picture
ConnieSW
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2012

Although I had uterine cancer, I was treated with the same drugs as Alexandra.  My experience was much like hers except I did lose my appetite.  It was nothing like the previous poster experienced and I really valued my time with the other ladies in the chemo room.  We supported and educated each other.  

pattysoo's picture
pattysoo
Posts: 173
Joined: Oct 2010

Three years down the road with this disease and I've started to be more active in seeking respite for my husband who is my primary caregiver. I rely on him for so much and recently realized that I can encourage him to get away from it all now and then. So he goes to play raquetball with a friend, has a part time job he enjoys, and allows friends to accompany me to chemotherapy now and then. He worries that I don't tell him everything, but I now try to screen out my more unsubstantial worries. This is good self monitoring for me too. So, if you can, be sure to take care of yourself. It's ok for you to have a break now and then. I hope you have support from friends and family that allow you to do that.

Chemohubbyau's picture
Chemohubbyau
Posts: 7
Joined: Sep 2013

Hi my wife has also been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. We are yet to be told what stage we are looking at. It was found by default after all ultrasound external and internal plus cat scans all suggested a gall bladder problem. Fortunately the surgeon opted for a laproscopy and discovered some tissues that shouldnt be there. They called in our local gynacoligist who was 2 weeks from retirement who called the Mercy Hospital gynacological oncology unit and we were off to the big city ( we live 2 hours east of Melbourne). She has had 2 cycles of carbo/taxol with a scan to be done next week then discussions on possible surgery (we hope not) or 4 more cycles of chemo. Afer the first round we went thru he highs and lows in the first week then had some great days until round 2. During the 2nd round she had a reaction to the taxol and after a half hour break was able to continue with the chemo. Today is day 5 after chemo and we have had a shocker. With no sleep last night and an upset tummy with pains similar to the reaction she had during the last treatment she had some severe panic attacks. I contacted our local doctor and got some diazapan which has settled her down very well and we are hopefull that a good nights sleep will make for a better day tomorrow. Sorry to prattle on but would like to hear any ideas that can help me look after her better.

pattysoo's picture
pattysoo
Posts: 173
Joined: Oct 2010

Possibly it's steriods that don't allow her to sleep and then panic attacks follow. Steriods are given along with benedryl and sometimes ativan and/or pepsid to buffer the effects of chemo. Ask her physician if these medications are giving her problems like you describe. Sometimes just knowing that it's the meds can help you cope. I use the steroid "high" to get lots of things done the day after chemo. Then I crash for a day or so - meaning lots of rest time. After that I perk back up until the next round. (sigh)

Pamela B's picture
Pamela B
Posts: 108
Joined: Jan 2013

I have to say the husbands on this board are amazing!  Well done gentleman your wives are lucky to have you at their side.  Everyone's experience is different.  Find the best doctor you can, someone you like and believe in, and go with it. Stay positive and know it is a chronic, treatable disease.  I had 5 rounds of IP/IV Taxol and cicplatin.  I did have a funny odor during chemo but I never lost my appetite or had any nausea.  In fact, because of the steroids I gained weight.  Research all you can and listen to the experienced advice from this board. These ladies are lovely and we will all share what ever we can to help your wives. Wishing you all the best.

dannythakur
Posts: 12
Joined: Jul 2013

Thanks indeed all of you for sharing your experience and for your support. 

 

Aftert three chemo, when doctors did surgery they could see again many cancer nodules inside the body - spread over near by areas. 

 

Does it mean chemo not working ?

 

Doctors have asked to repeat 3 more cycles of chemo, paclitaxel and carboplatin. 

 

Kindly suggest. 

Alexandra's picture
Alexandra
Posts: 1210
Joined: Jul 2012

Your wife had her main surgery debulking / hysterectomy back in July followed by 3 rounds of Carbo-Taxol and second-look (?) surgery in Septemer. Just because disease was found inside her does not mean that chemo is not working. Actually the fact that doctors intend on continuing 3 more rounds of the same chemo tells me that it's working. If her CA125 is decreasing - chemo is working. If her tumors are shrinking in size - chemo is working. Even if all cancer was removed by the surgeon, it's common practice to do total 6-8 rounds of chemo to get rid of microscopic cancer cells.

I would ask her doctor about the status. If they are not being forthcoming and clear - request the copy of the progress notes, CT scans, blood tests, surgical transcripts and surgical pathology and get the second opinion. From a reputable Gyno-Oncologist, not on the internet.

My best wishes to you and your wife.

Alexandra

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network