CSN Login
Members Online: 4

Naltrexone

shirleyroberta's picture
shirleyroberta
Posts: 15
Joined: Jun 2010

Has anyone used the drug Naltrexone?

Alexandra's picture
Alexandra
Posts: 1198
Joined: Jul 2012

Hello Shirley Roberta,

Naltrexone is a powerful opiod receptor antagonist, blocking euphoric effect from alcohol and drugs. "Party pooper" drug...

There are many wild claims online that off-label in low doses it works to help HIV/AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and central nervous system disorders. I tend not to trust pseudo-scientific research published on web-sites that also have links to purchase the drug.

http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_dose_naltrexone

RoseyR
Posts: 462
Joined: Feb 2011

 

As one of several cancer patients I know who are on LDN, I'd to dispell wild claims about it--such as its capacity to be a "party-pooper drug." For a few, it may be--but for others such as me, the effects of a glass of red wine--very mild intoxication--are what they have always been, even after taking LDN for a year.  

I suggest you read articles by Dr. Burt Berkson and books such as The Promise of Low-Dose Naltrexone by those who pioneered its research at Penn State University rather than write the drug off merely because some web sites that praise it show links to the product; however effective a substance, it invariably spawns a few sites that are commercially connected to the product. 

MS patients, in particular, have often found dramatic relief of symptoms after starting LDN.

My own integrative doctor, a very conservative M.D. from an ivy league university, was the one who suggested I try it to delay cancer recurrence.  (My tumor, a rare and aggressive one, usually recur within a year and a half to two after diagnosis.  So far it's been three, and I remain NED.)

LDN doesn't claim to be a cure for cancer.  But there IS evidence that it often delays recurrence, sometimes substantially.  And with IV alpha-lipoic acid, even more effectively.

Best,

Rosey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

LDN is used extensively in the integrative world of cancer treatment.  Cancer has opiate receptors, which means that taking opiate pain killers actually stimulates cancer growth.  By blocking these receptors, whether taking pain meds, or not, you block another avenue that can feed cancer.  The bonus of LDN is that it provides a feeling of well being for the patient.  I know a number of women who are on LDN and it certainly is helping them in a number of ways.

jt25741
Posts: 22
Joined: Apr 2012

Since after initial diagnosis over 4 years ago Stage IV Clear Cell PPC, she is on 4.5mg LDN daily.    I dont know how much it is helped.....if any...but the fact is she is doing much better than the avarage cancer patient after being through as many chemo treatments as she has.  I feel it has helped her stay strong, at minimum.      It boosts endorphines too.

shirleyroberta's picture
shirleyroberta
Posts: 15
Joined: Jun 2010

Thanks everyone for your responses.  This drug has been prescribed for me by a naturopath oncologist. I am taking it along with mistletoe as well as doxil. The doxil hasn't been very effective which is why I'm willing to try anything else.

RoseyR
Posts: 462
Joined: Feb 2011

 

Yes, my integrative doctor--a very very conservative M.D. who prescribes only with a lot of clinical data--asked me to consider taking Low Dose Naltrexone a year ago.

I started at 1.5 mg a night and gradually worked up to 4 mg at bedtime.

It has had NO side effects for me--nor is it a "party pooper."  (I still feel the effects of a glass or red wine; I enjoy it as much as ever!).

You will have to get it by prescription from your doctor from a compounding pharmacy.  

There are several well researched books on the topic.

And while of course there is always "junk" on the internet that at best is of anecdotal interest, you will find there too evidence that many MS patients swear by it and that a growing number of cancer patients are staying in remission longer than usual while on it.

Best,

Rosey

 

kikz's picture
kikz
Posts: 1267
Joined: Jun 2010

So promising why is it not used more?  We need all the help we can get.  I will mention it to my doctors.  I hope they have some knowledge of this.   I have never broght them any kind of suggestions for treatment.  I am also curious about hemp oil which I have read about on Facebook.   Something has to start working for us.  At this rate I think I'll go nuts before the cancer gets me.

Karen

RoseyR
Posts: 462
Joined: Feb 2011

 

First, LDN is inexpensive: no pharaceutical company is going to make millions on it.

 

Secondly, oncologists are trained in med school to prescribe ONLY chemo, radiation, and pharmaceutical--to administer treatment exactly by "the book," as it HAS been administered for the prior two decades, not to do their own research and think "outside the box," the limited and self-perpetuating paradigm in which they are trained.

 

Thirdly, few doctors have time to stay abreast of research on promising new treatmentsexcept those that, promising to extend our lives "for amother three months" and paying oncologists a fortune to administer them, are touted by pharmaceutical companies, who even wine and dine doctors to prescribe agents, such as taxol, which maim our immune systems, not anything as bengn and inexpensive as LDN.   

 

This may sound a bit cynical, but after three years of research into the panoply of treatments available to us, I honestly believe that these are the main reasons.

 

Rosey

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network