CSN Login
Members Online: 17

Raw Vegan with an occasional splurge of wine

FourBee's picture
FourBee
Posts: 15
Joined: May 2013

Two and a half years into this Stage IVB Grade I uterine adenocarcinoma saga I have finally gone raw vegan. In addition to this I let my gyn onc know that I am exploring copper chelation (have known about it for a couple of years but a recent clinical trial success on aggressive breast confirmed efficacy). So today is day 10 of the new eating regime and I feel fine. Thankfully I am also losing weight as that could have been a contributing factor to my cancer (hormone positive).

Anyone else gone down the all raw road?

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

FourBee,

I've known a number of women who went the raw vegan route.  It appears to be a great short term cleanse that will reset certain things in the body, but not sustainable for the long term.  I know a number of ovarian cancer patients who stared eating this way and ended up with recurrance.  I know an ovarian cancer patient who was raw vegan for 20 years before being diagnosed with ovarian cancer.  She has been fighting the disease for 3 years, without acheiving remission.  Evidently, her system was so compromised by the long term raw vegan lifestyle that it has been hard to get things turned around.  She is still fighting a good fight and doing better than ever, working with a naturopath who gradually switched her over to a Paleo diet.  I've seen a number of women, whose tumor markers were rising, get good results from switcing to a Paleo diet alone. 

Copper chelation, using Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is a very effective procedure.  If your copper level is not elevated, however, it can be a dangerous avenue.  Have you had your serum copper and ceruloplasmin checked to see if they are elevated?  Too much copper is definitely a bad situation for a cancer patient, as it is an angiogenic and promotes blood vessel growth to the tumor.  If your level is only slightly elevated, however, it may be more appropriate to reduce it by supplementing with zinc citrate.

 

FourBee's picture
FourBee
Posts: 15
Joined: May 2013

Thanks for your comments. I find it hard to sustain raw vegan but do not eat any meat. There is a link between meat and an inflammatory response in the body. The copper chelation is my avenue of choice and I will see if I can make it to the end of the year before I have any disease spread.

Looking forward to learning more from you.

Bee

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1057
Joined: Sep 2010

Good luck with the chelation therapy.

You are absolutley right about the connection between conventionally raised meat and the inflammatory response.  This is a result of the high omega 6 content in commercially raised meats, along with the antibiotics and hormones used in this type of meat production.  Feeding animals grains, just as feeding humans grains, fattens them up quickly.  If, however, the meat is raised AND finished on pasture, and this includes chickens, the meat is high in omega 3s, which actually helps reduce inflammatory response.  Commercially raised fish also have the high omega 6 content, as they are also fed grains.  Wild caught fish is healthy fish.

Not that I'm trying to convince you to eat meat.  Just saying there is a vast difference between commercially raised and pastured forms. 

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I think the more plants we can eat, the better, except for grains. Plants have many nutrients that are obviously beneficial in fighting disease. 

FourBee, when you're speaking about link between meat and inflammation response in body, assuming you're looking at "commercial" type meats?  As Tethys mentioned we want the pastured, grass-fed, non-grain fed meats which offer the good Omega 3's.  Commercial meats are loaded with hormones and pesticides, and is grain fed, which changes the composition of the natural fats in meat. Non-organic chicken, although raised without hormones, is also high in arsenic.

People who are limiting their animal products to ORGANIC animal products (fish, organic eggs, poultry and some red meats) are seeing their CA125s come down. It's hard to ignor their success. And there are a number of former vegans who have participated in this forum who got cancer anyway, and have seen their CA125s come down since they have switched to eating more ORGANIC animal protein and eliminating grains (which metabolize like sugar). 

I consume a high intake of plants, AND some ORGANIC animal protein, while as well limiting sugar and grains, I try and get lots of cooked (many more are cooked due to side affects from radiation causing some intestinal problems) and uncooked veggies every day (including onions and mushrooms, which are supposed to be cancer-fighters), and I have increased my animal protein intake to modest servings at every meal. 

It's all about choices and this has been my choice after research and input from Tethys and a few others.   So far, it's working very well for me. I feel better, and my CA125 is staying low.  This approach limits carbs, sugars and grains, maximizes veggies that fight cancer (I eat probably 5 cups a day), and provides good quality protein to help keep blood sugar low. It's very easy, when eating vegan, to eat way too many grains.

Thoughts to ponder as do what works for YOU....

Jan

 

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network