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Has anyone had the BRCA gene test and what were your results?

Angie2U's picture
Angie2U
Posts: 2993
Joined: Sep 2009

My other post on Angelina's decision for a preventative mastectomy got me thinking on how many here have had this test done and what were your results.

Thanks, Angie

Ritzy's picture
Ritzy
Posts: 4384
Joined: Aug 2009

I didn't have the test done Angie and it was even offered free of charge at my cancer center. I know it is quite costly for those that have to pay for it, if there insurance won't.  There is talk that if you decide to have the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 tests done and you are negative, you might want to go further and have the BART test done.  I found this info:

 

Patients who tested negative for a BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutation may still be at risk for familial breast or ovarian cancer. Recent research found that standard genetic testing failed to detect cancer-associated mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in about 12 percent of patients at very high risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

This new technology, called BRACAnalysis® Rearrangement Test (BART), detects rare, large cancer-associated rearrangements of the DNA in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which were previously undetected by standard genetic testing called comprehensive BRACAnalysis®. BART and BRACAnalysis® were developed by Myriad Genetics Inc., the single supplier of BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing in the United States.

Sue

Smiley happy 040.gif

RozHopkins
Posts: 475
Joined: Dec 2010

So Sue, do you mean with a negative BRCA test result, I only had one I think, my daughter could still get breast cancer from the gene because test wasn't accurate?  I thought she had a NORMAL chance as any others female without gene.  How much would this new test be do you think?

Ritzy's picture
Ritzy
Posts: 4384
Joined: Aug 2009

I really don't know Roz.  I know, this is confusing.  I pray she doesn't!   Here is some additional information I found:

BRCA testing means comprehensive BRACAnalysis® that includes complete sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and an additional procedure to identify five common large rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene.

About 96% of all mutations and rearrangements of BRCA 1 and 2 are found with this method.

BART (BRACAnalysis Large Rearrangement Test) was introduced in 2006 and detects additional rare large genomic rearrangements in both BRCA1 and BRCA2. About 1 percent of individuals who meet the family history criteria for BART will have a mutation detected by the test.

In 2012 NCCN guidelines were updated and now recommend BART testing for all individuals undergoing BRCAAnalysis.

 

Sue :)

Josie21
Posts: 359
Joined: Nov 2012

I had it done and I had a 'a mutation of unknown significance'.   Whatever that means!  I was surprised that no one ever got in touch with me over the years to see what happened to me.  Maybe people who had my mutation are at a higher risk of breast cancer.  I know I was because I got it!  

Ginny

Patti1967
Posts: 186
Joined: Mar 2013

Yep I had it done last Oct, neg...there are two others that I had, can't think of the names right off hand, but they were also neg.  U of C now wants to run a full genetic screen on me.  They think with all that is going on with me I must have a "mutated" gene.  So I said sure, why not, knock yourself out.  It could help my children, grandchildren one day.

cathyp's picture
cathyp
Posts: 366
Joined: Dec 2009

I also had a "mutation of unknown significance".  At the time in 2008 there were 11 women with this mutation.  At the time I was undergoing surgery to remove a complex ovarian cyst with an elevated CA125.  The docs weren't sure how to proceed with this unknown siginificance at the time. 

I think it was about a year later i received an update saying it was reclassified as no mutation.  I'm fairly certain I have some type of gene mutation as I have had Hodgkin's Lymphoma.  My BC was a result of  radiation treatment for Hodgkins.  I also have another clotting mutation.  Who knows what else!

Whitneyburk
Posts: 4
Joined: May 2013

I had it done last month, it was negative, even though I was diagnosed last month with stage 4 breast cancer at the age of 37. I don't have any family history of bc, had 2 kids in my 20's and breast fed both of them, I got the test thinking it would make some sense of the situation. It didn't, but it did give me peace of mind knowing I didn't pass a mutation to my daughter.

 

Kristin N's picture
Kristin N
Posts: 1969
Joined: Mar 2009

No, I haven't had this test yet.

camul's picture
camul
Posts: 2119
Joined: Dec 2010

Yes, mine was negative, however, there is so much cancer in our family that my oncologist feels there is a mutation of some kind, and all of my brothers and sisters agree.  So they are all proactive on getting checkups, etc. 

camul's picture
camul
Posts: 2119
Joined: Dec 2010

Dbl post.

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4015
Joined: Oct 2009

Had the test (so did one of my sisters).  We both tested negative.  Terrible family history: 3 of 4 sisters have had breast cancer; my dad and his 2 brothers had colon cancer (my dad had no  sisters); my dad's mom and all of her sisters (5 of them) either died of breast or, in one case, colon cancer.

Docs say I have genetic cancer but there is no test for it yet.

 

chicaroo44
Posts: 18
Joined: May 2013

I tested positive for the brca1 mutation.  My mother and 2 of her sisters out of 5 and mymothers mom all had breast cancer.  I have a 22 year old daughter whom I want to have tested but my doctor says they won't even consider it till she is 25. 

June Bugs
Posts: 169
Joined: May 2013

I have not taken this test.  I think it's just a blood test, isn't it?  I probably will once I finish radiation for my daughters sake.

Thanks for bringing this up,

June

Angie2U's picture
Angie2U
Posts: 2993
Joined: Sep 2009

Yes, it is a blood test June. 

taylor manny
Posts: 114
Joined: May 2013

I haven't.  Is this important to get?  I think they mentioned it at my cancer center, but, with everything else going on, I didn't pay much attention to it. 

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