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Aromasin for 10 years?

Josie21
Posts: 335
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Everyone,

I just went for my 6 month check-up and was told I will be stopping Aromasin in December.  That will be my five year mark.  My oncologist said it was only determined that tamoxifen will be used for 10 years.  Has anyone heard anything different from their doctors?  I thought maybe I would be done because I had a full hysterectomy 2 years back.  How much estrogen can I have left?

Also, it seems that so many Pink Sisters are struggling right now and I want you to know you are all in my thoughts and prayers.  

Please let there be a cure soon!!

Hugs,

Ginny

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 3700
Joined: Oct 2009

Honestly, I don't think anyone knows for sure.  When tamoxifen came out, the oncologists first had no idea, then strongly recommended 5 years.  Now that has changed to 10.  I took 7 years of tamoxifen but I wish I had taken 10.

The aromatase inhibitors are another kettle of fish and I would listen to the oncologist (unless you are really high risk), but I would keep my ears open for changes in the recommendations.

My younger sister had Stage 1 IDC and had a local recurrence 5 years later.  She has now been on an aromatase inhibitor for about 7 years.  She doesn't know what to do, but her oncologist doesn't feel strongly one way or the other in light of our terrible fanily history and my progression to Stage 4 after 18 year remission.  Also have another sister who had breast cancer and numerous other relatives.

"What is the role of aromatase inhibitors for women with breast cancer?"

http://www.nccn.com/component/content/article/57-cancer-answers/244-cancer-answers-aromatase-inhibitors.html

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 3700
Joined: Oct 2009

After menopause, your fat and adrenal glands still produce estrogen:

"Menopause. Menopause is considered to have occurred when a woman has gone a full 12 months without a period. At the point at which menopause occurs, the following hormonal changes occur:

  • Ovarian secretion of estrogen and progesterone ends.
  • Once the ovaries have stopped producing estrogens, however, they still continue to produce small amounts of the male hormone testosterone, which can be converted to estrogen (estradiol) in body fat.
  • In addition, the adrenal gland continues to produce androstenedione (a male hormone), which is converted to estrone and estradiol in the body fat.

Source: http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_menopause_000040_1.htm#ixzz2S6GAiVDz"

Josie21
Posts: 335
Joined: Nov 2012

Thanks CC.  I will definitely check out the website.  I hope your chemo treatment goes smoothly today and you feel well afterwards.  

Hugs coming your way,

Ginny

Rague
Posts: 3158
Joined: Aug 2009

I have only been on Femara/letrozole  for 3+years.  I've been told by my Chemo Dr that  being a high risk of recurrance/mets (IBC) that the current protocol is to stay on it forever.

Estrogen is in our bodies even with a hysterectomy or passing menopause.  The amount does go down but not away totally.  Also many foods contain it or what will let our bodies produce it.  Check to see how many foods in the grocery contain soy.

Winyan -The Power Within

Susan

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