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New; CD8 (Cytotoxic) T-Cell Lymphoma

MChantal's picture
MChantal
Posts: 92
Joined: Apr 2013

Well, the title says it all. Kyle has been diagnosed with CD8 T-Cell Lymphoma. In which, I am finding it hard to find information on this type of lymphoma because I do not think it is the correct diagnosis name. I think it actually is something along the lines of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma. So I am awaiting the doctor's notes.

We are grateful tho, still, that it is note Hepatosplenic Gamma Delta T-cell Lymphoma. And, that there is 90% chance of getting Kyle into remission. Than it turns into a 60/40% ratio to cure this cancer. However, Kyle is the perfect candiate, so to say. Because, he is young, has no past medical history and well, before this was in great health. The boy could run a mile and a half in 5 mins and 34 seconds!

The plan of action is;

  • Port placement next week
  • Predisone started
  • 6 cycles of CHOP-R
  • After chemo, stem cell replacement (due to the aggression of his lymphoma which had a rapid onset)

We are ready to beat this! Bring it on cancer!

I think I failed to mention that I am currently in the nursing program at the University of New Mexico here in Albuquerque about to start my second semester. Talk about helping me decide whether I truly want to become a nurse...Haha.

 

illead's picture
illead
Posts: 476
Joined: Aug 2012

Michelle,

     I don't know anything about T-cell lymphomas but it sounds very encouraging that Kyle will get through this.  I know it must be a big relief for you both and your families.  Now you know what the battle is and how to fight it and great odds.  We are so happy for you.  How coincidental that you are studying nursing.  You two will do fine now that you have a light at the "middle" of the tunnel.  You have everything going for you.  Please keep us all in loop and we will be here whenever either of you need us.    Kyle gets to experience prednisone Wink Sue is the expert on that.  The very best to you both, we'll be thinking of you, Bill & Becky

P.S. BTW, you make a handsome couple.

 

MChantal's picture
MChantal
Posts: 92
Joined: Apr 2013

It is actually a big relief, that we know what it is. Finally, after 2 months of contemplation. It's okay tho, we are as ready as we can be for this. Our families are both amazing in what they have done for us so far. We leave back home tomorrow from MN and my mother is already at our home making sure the vents are cleaned, with new pads, and is setting up so we can clean and sanitize the house complete. Make it "Chemo proof!" Ha!

I will definitely have to talk with Sue about Prednisone. From the little blogs I have read, it should be a trip! Lol.

Thank you very much Bill & Becky for the support.

P.S.S. Thank you again for the comment about us :)

anliperez915's picture
anliperez915
Posts: 741
Joined: Sep 2011

Hi Michelle,

Sending you both positive vibes, I just know that you guys will be ok! 

I visited Albuquerque in 2010, I had my graduation there..I live in El Paso, anyway I loved the city especially Casa Rondañe and El Pinto Restuarant. Wish I could go back just to have another wine glass from there hehehe :D

take care and please keep us updated

Sincerely,

Liz

jimwins's picture
jimwins
Posts: 1975
Joined: Aug 2011

Hi Michelle and Kyle.  I'm glad you have a diagnosis and things look hopeful. Many of us here have been on similar regimens (R-EPOCH here).  One thing often suggested here is to get a second opinion.  I know in my case, I was told a stemcell transplant would be the next step if my cancer recurred. October 2013 will make two years remission for me and we'll talk about getting my extra nipples (dual port) removed ;).

You will certainly be enhancing your nursing education with this.  You will meet some wonderful medical staff and most likely learn alot from the nurses on your team.  Just know you guys are not alone here.

Hugs and postive thoughts - Jim

po18guy
Posts: 237
Joined: Nov 2011

I have been intreatment for an unknown subtype of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma (NOS) for almost 5 years. There are several subtypes that are known and some are indolent, or slow growing. These are normally Cutaneous Lymphomas that present in the skin. However, other forms can be quite aggressive. There has been a huge amount of progress made in the past few years against T-Cell Lymphomas, yet little is known about them. Prognosis is generally given as poor, but I have no evidence of disease at the 5-year mrk, so it is obvious that there is a lot of hope. If you can obtain the precise diagnosis, it will help yoiu to know treatment types as well as potential outcomes.

Although I am only a patient, I would caution you to watch the progression of treatment closely. Since most T-Cell Lymphomas are aggressive, treatment should be immediately effective. If it is not, I woukd seek an alternative chemotherapy regimen quickly, as these types do not allow much time for error. You might ask doctor what plan B is, since these are also known to be resistent to chemotherapy, and to relapse once treatment is completed. I know this is not very reassuring, but the fact that I am here (when I had about 12 weeks to live at my diagnosis in 2008) should provide at least some hope. All the best to you!

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 465
Joined: Mar 2013

 

Michelle, it is so good to see you smiling (beaming;glowing) and sounding so much better than you did when you posted before. You and Kyle have come a long way in a short time. I will continue positive thoughts and prayers for you.

Rocquie

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