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Got my results

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Before Tuesday we called it my "oddly shaped tennis ball" Now we call it my "Cancer ball"...Tongue Out

I got my MRI results Tuesday - I have cancer. It was a roller coaster of Bad news/Good news...

Bad news: I have cancer.
Good News: They are pretty sure it is contained in my left kidney.

Bad news: Its in the collecting ducts of the kidney which means they have to do a radical nephrectomy.
Good news: You only need 1/3 of a kidney to live- so hey - Im up by 2/3 lol
Bad news (at least my 8 yr old thinks so lol he thought having a robot do the surgery would be "way cooler") - Its too large to have robotic surgery, >8cm.
Good news : They dont have to do an open surgery. It will be a hand assisted laproscopic surgery: 1 inscission in front, from my belly button up big enough for him to get his hands inside and 2 on my side for the "tools" - Im gonna be a backwards puppet - Jeff Dunham comes to mind lol

Anyone faimilar with the hand assisited lap.? Any tips for afterwards?

The surgery itsself should be about 2-4 hours and then 3-5 days in the hospital.

I dont know when the surgery will be yet - should know by the end of Friday. Though this isnt an emergency - like do it tomorrow kind of surgery - he wants to do it sooner rather than later and I agree!

So I guess on the totem pole of kidney cancer this is pretty low - not as low as it could be but not nearly as bad as it could be either.

Staying positive and logical...I have cancerous mass, we will remove it, then I wont have a cancerous mass...the end (kinda not the end b/c of the follow up scans for the rest of forever which is going to be long time since im only 32 Winkbut I digress...)

My only concern is that on the MRI  report it states that there are 'smaller subcentimeter T2 hypertense lesions in the right kidney...suggestive of cysts' and basically the same thing on my spleen. 3 years ago they told me the "cancer ball" in my left kidney was 'just a cyst'.....  At least we are aware of these issues involving the right kidney and spleen early and can monitor them. BUT...Could they be wrong about it being contained in the keft kidney? Or am I just a cysty person??? I plan to ask him about all of this at my pre op visit, but what do you think? Anyone had similar issues?

Any advice is always welcome! Thanks for listening!!

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

and you're way ahead with that excellent attitude!  I think you should remain incystent! - keep asking those questions.  Many, if not even most of us, have lots of harmless cysts that we don't need to get worked up about.  If we didn't have the scans we'd never know about them and could reach a ripe old age and die without anyone ever knowing about them.

With a bit of luck, your tumor will remain contained and once it's out you'll be fine. In any case, the need for future monitoring does guarantee that the cysts will also be watched so, as you've said, you've got an early warning system built in should it ever be needed. I hope all goes well.  Keep us posted.

icemantoo's picture
icemantoo
Posts: 1529
Joined: Jan 2010

Cysts ar common and normal. I have one or two on the Kidney I have left (the right Kidney) and it has been monitored the last 10 and 1/2 years by CTs initially and the last 5 years or so by an Ultrasound.

 

 

Icemantoo

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Thanks! After I posted that I talked to my husband about the cysts and said the doctor went over that when we were in there, I guess I kind of zoned out a bit when the dr was talking after I heard the part about cancer lol

Eims's picture
Eims
Posts: 420
Joined: Feb 2013

hey memejoy,  a lady across from me in my ward had her kidney taken out by keyhole surgery and she was up an about within 24 hours and she smoked 30-40 ciggies a day!!!  its great that you are asking all the right questions and to be honest any question is justified.  everyone on this board is here for you.....stay in touch.

eims x

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Thanks so much for all the encouraging words! Sorry I didn’t respond sooner !

 

I found out that my surgery will be on May 9th. My doc will not be doing the surgery, it will be performed by the the chief urologist at the hospital, so that works! They are in the same practice as well.

 

Since he (surgeon) and I have never met, I have a meet-and-greet appointment with him next week to ask questions about the surgery and what not. I don’t have another appt. with MY doc before the surgery.

 

Which brings me to this:

 

Last year I went to my GP about some “bumps” on my left shin. After doing skin scrapes he said he had no idea what it was and that it was probably an allergic reaction to something. Well those bumps are still there, the EXACT same bumps. I looked online to try and see if I could figure out what they were to no avail. However now that I know I have kidney cancer I decided to do another search and see if the 2 could be related. This led me to HLRCC.  Both of my parents were adopted (mom fully – dad by his dad – paternal grandmother was also adopted by her father) so not much is known about my family history. However, my paternal grandmother is the one who passed away at 50 from RCC. (my user name has nothing to do with my name, it is a nod to her)

 

Question(s)1: I want to ask my dr. about the possibility of HLRCC, or at least let someone know that I feel this warrants some attention, should I bring that up with the dr. who is doing my surgery or wait and tell my urologist when I see him next?  Does anyone have any experience with HLRCC? Should I start a new thread about it?

 

Question(s)2: My doc said the cancer was in the collecting duct…does this imply Collecting Duct Carcinoma? Or can that only be confirmed after it has been removed?  I’ve seen some things regarding that particular cancer type and they aren’t exactly …….reassuring….. Again, is this a question that I should bring up with the surgeon or with my doc.?

 

I feel like there should be a 24 hr hotline for cancer related questions once you are diagnosed because the questions just keep coming lol

 

Thanks again for everything!

 

AprilandChuck's picture
AprilandChuck
Posts: 95
Joined: Feb 2013

Chuck had hand assisted surgery I think the biggest difference is a slightly longer recovery time and just a bit more pain...he did well with it and recovery is faster than open...which is a good thing...as to the collecting duct I did not see if you said you had a biopsy I would think they would wait to state type till after you pathology report comes back..just my opinion..some of the ones wyo have been here longer may know more than me lol lots of people do about this because I am still learning...don't borrow trouble would be my advice..worry about doing what you can now..and healing from the surgery after you have it..and see whats goinng on with it..sometimes I think it was a blessing that everything happened so quick with us ...we did not have time to worry..praying that everything goes wonderful for you...huggss p.s. I would bring it to both doctors attention..about your grandmother...

AprilandChuck's picture
AprilandChuck
Posts: 95
Joined: Feb 2013

One more question is your doctor or the chief of the department a urological oncologist...and have the suggested bringing an oncologist onto your case..in our experience the sooner you meet an oncologist and they review your stuff the better..

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

I can't speak for the UK position as a whole but questions like April's can't arise where I am being treated.  We have the MDT model, where each case is constantly reviewed in weekly meetings involving a team of urologists, oncologists, radiologists, cancer nurses, with nephrologists pulled in if necessary.  There's no question of a hole in expertise (even though it's RCC) so no need to go looking for it.

It seems to me that that is relatively rare Statesside - is my set-up the exception rather than the rule over there?  Of course, the UK is tiny compared with the US so we're much more likely to be close to specialist facilities when we need them.  I guess that when it comes to a tricky rare cancer like RCC, where there is a paucity of real experts, many of you folks must need to look a lot further afield, sift through much larger numbers of possible experts and then, quite often, travel considerable distances to get the expert treatment that you need.  If that's right, then a major virtue of forums like this is in enabling seasoned patients to advise newbies accordingly and to give help in pointing to the best places to go to.  That must be a valuable function in countries as large as yours.

Galrim's picture
Galrim
Posts: 274
Joined: Apr 2013

Regarding the setup for UK you describe, thats the same here in Denmark where I live. All evaluations, including even regular control scans, goes to what they here name as a "Kidney Conference" (direct translation). Minimum staff attending the conference is always 1 x oncologist, 1 x urologist, 1 x radiologist.

But in general I guess there will always be differences to the rules and applied practises. And as you mention, geography and availability probably plays a part.

Regarding the latter, I can share a story from my own family which is food for thought (though with a happy ending):

I have a large family in Canada, my great grandfathers sisters descendants which we still keep contact with. Three years ago my uncle once removed discovered he had a lot of enlarged lymph glands in the scrotum area.

He lives in New brunswick, small rural town, not many specialists around. Went to see his GP who sent him to get examined in a small provincial hospital (think it was in Frederickton). Verdict: Lymphatic cancer (lymphoma). Prognosis from the MD´s there? Nothing we can do about it, too progressed. It evolves slowly so you have some years to go, but no treatment except for palliative once you get to that stage.

Hell no my uncle said. He didnt want to accept it just like that. Normally the next step would probably be to go to Toronto, Ottawa or similar and see a specialist. However, my uncle had been stationed in Germany when he was a soldier (hes 55) and still have a lot of friends there. Knowing Germanys reputation in cancer treatment they helped him find a specialist, think it was in Hannover, and he went over there in 2011. Saw the oncologist there, had a lot of tests and checks. Comes in for the consultation to get the conclusion from the German oncologist: "You will die of old age before this thing gets you if you get the right treatment".

The German oncologist then wrote a letter with instructions and his diagnosis as well as treatment plans. Gave them to my uncle who went home, went to a specialist in Ottawa who concurred with the German oncologist and started chemo for three months. Today he is 18 months NED...

/G 

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Gee, thanks for that interesting and illuminating post! 

It demonstrates the value of not taking 'no' for an answer - just like Fox's history.

It  shows the value of the team approach, in Denmark too, and it confirms how far ahead Germany is in some important areas of cancer treatment.

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Thats awesome that your uncle had the means and determination to fly all the way to Germany!

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

"...the sooner you meet an oncologist.. the better". True.

My urologic oncologist was very slow to recommend me seeing a medical oncologist. This seems to be the norm. I highly recommend seeing a medical oncologist with experience in RCC as soon as you can. It's not a higher priority than the urologic oncologist, but it should be done soon. They can tell you about the risks of metastatic disease, and they can look into studies and drug trials you might be eligible for. They are the ones that will be treating the disease if it does spread, not the urologic oncologist, so they have better information about the disease from a systemic point of view.

Todd

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

When my doc told me the news one of the first questions we asked was if I needed to go to an oncologist and his response was that, for this, he is my oncologist. I know that he, the surgeon, and many of the other doctors in the practice specialize in kidney, and other urological, cancers but honestly I dont know if that makes them "urological oncologists". The only place I have even see that specific title listed is at Emory (I'm outside of Atlanta and I've been looking around).

I imagine that if it ever decides to spread then I may need to see someone else. I will add that to my ever growing list of FAQ I plan to take with me next week.

 

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

They really won't know what it is until they get it out and put it under a miscroscope. Unfortunately, that's pretty much the case.

A week or so after the surgery you'll get a detailed pathology report that will tell you exactly what it is (was).

Make sure you take at least 1 person with you into the appointment. Write your questions down between now and then so you get them all answered. It's hard to reach these doctors at other times. I took 3 people in with me, and I was glad I did. They had to put us in a larger room. I felt the doctor went slower, and explained more thoroughly when he had a larger audience. By the way, each time I saw my doctor he was accompanied by 2-3 people as well (interns, research coordinators, etc). Having my son and 2 of my best friends with me, really helped me to feel like my side was well represented. :)

Funny story. One of my good friends is Vietnamese. I thought he was going to wait in the waiting room during the appointment. However, when they called us he just started in with us. I started to tell him to wait, but the nurse said it was no problem he could come. I had thought he wouldn't be of much use in the meeting because his English is quite poor. We had the meeting with the doctor which lasted about 20 minutes and then he left. Then later we were discussing the questions and answers and one of the questions we couldn't remember exactly what he said. Then my Vietnamese friend pulls his phone out of his pocket and says "Well, let's just listen to it again..."! Turns out he was the most useful person in the room with me. He'd thought to turn his phone on record and he'd recorded the entire conversation! It was very helpful. Lol.

Todd

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

From here on out my husband will be going to all of my appointments with me.

Thats a really good idea about the phone! I just may do that!!

I figured there was no way for them to tell for sure what kind it is until they did the whole pathology thing.

Thanks to everyone for all the info!!!

AprilandChuck's picture
AprilandChuck
Posts: 95
Joined: Feb 2013

Urological Oncologist. ? I did not know there was such a thing till the hospital explained my husbands urologist special training in his field..however thatdid not stop him from asking for our permission to bring  in a medical oncologist/with immunotherapy background to look everything over and meet with us too..which ended up being what we needed realitivly quickly..the more eyes on the problem the better. Huggs 

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

 I was mistaken ...Emory has a Uro-Oncology Center but, looking again, it doesn't look as though anyone is actually designated as a Urological oncologist - I just made that leap I suppose. No one has mentioned bringing anyone else on board, however I haven't seen anyone since I had "the" appointment.

I will say this, at first I didn't think 3 weeks was that long of time to wait between "You have cancer" and surgery but it seems aas though it is taking forever!!! I am trying to stay all happy happy like its no big deal but with each day its getting harder and harder to do. I know I should 'not worry' and 'focus on other things' but I'm finding that that's easier said than done at times. Somedays I feel like a 4 year old with ADD lol

Thanks for the insight!

AprilandChuck's picture
AprilandChuck
Posts: 95
Joined: Feb 2013

Scared is normal whether its 3 days or 3 weeks give yourself a break...this kind of news will rattle the calmist of people..praying for you to have a good surgery and recovery..and for you to get good news after..hugggss

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Thanks so much! BIG Hugggsss back at'cha Wink

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

Then there is the plain old "urologist". It took me a few weeks to sort this naming of specialists out. I think the naming is confusing and misleading. So if you want something cut out, see a urologist or a urologic oncologist (better with regards to tumors and laprascopic surgery and partial nephrectomies), but if you want a sort of "systems specialist" with regards to cancer and someone that treats systemic/metastatic disease with chemo, radiation (and might recommend surgery but not likely to do it), then see a medical oncologist.

The urologic oncologist is a urologist/surgeon first and then specialized in removing tumors by surgical means, where the medical oncologist often is an internal medicine doctor first (often with a specialty in either hematology or immunology) who then specialized in treating cancer mostly with chemotherapy.

It sounds like you have a good doc if he brought a medical oncologist on board quickly. Mine did not. In fact, I had to go and do it myself. Now, my doc did consult other specialists when trying to decide if he could do a partial or it had to be a radical. He mentioned that. I was glad for it.

I agree. The more eyes on it, the better.

Todd

donna_lee's picture
donna_lee
Posts: 402
Joined: Feb 2009

It appears others have sent many positive notes to sustain you.  And I wish you well as you begin the surgery and recovery phase.  Then you will be able to get on with your life and enjoy the 8 year old.

For those of us who've been on the testing merry-go-round, we have found that we have lots of cysts in various organs-pancreas, what's left of the liver, the other kidney, etc.  Had we not had cancer and gone through a myriad of ultrasounds, bone scan, CT'sssssssssss,etc., and PET scan, & blood tests, we would have lived our entire life not knowing about the cysts.

But, they caught yours, and you're having that sucker taken out.  Hope you're up and back on your feet rapidly.  On this side of the pond, there are many tough nurses who say, "Let's go for a walk."  And you look at her/him and say, "You've got to be kidding."  Baby steps, first.

I had my first surgery in 2006, diagnosed by untrasound for what might have been gallstones on 4/29 that year.  It's 7 years, and 4 years cancer free, but who's counting?   ME and my family and friends.

Sounds like you have your ducks in a row and a great attitude.  Keep it up.

Donna

DonMiller's picture
DonMiller
Posts: 96
Joined: Feb 2013

Don’t worry about the hand assisted laprospotic surgery.  It hurts when you first wake up; it is a bit hard to breathe for about a day and you hurtin for about a week. Everyone is really nice to you which doesn’t become annoying for three or four days by which time you are starting to feel better.  The thing to watch is after about a week you feel ok, but you are really not and if you try to do too much you get exhausted.  For me this lasted a couple of weeks.

My mistake was not getting to an oncologist sooner.  My urologist gave me the impression that while it was major surgery as long as things went well I would be fine. I found out later I had a 11cm T3a grade 3 tumor with vascular and sinus invasion.  Even then the urologist told me she “got in all” and I just needed scans as a precaution.  By the time I read up on this I was past my eligibility for a clinical trial.  Moreover there are vaccines they can make from the tumor but arrangements have to be made in advance.  I understand their effectiveness has not been proven but I think I would have tried it anyway or at least made arrangement to preserve the tumor. 

Anyway that was 8 months ago and I am back at work and feel fine……….but it sure has changed my life. Sure I get anxious and sometimes depressed because I know I have close to a 50% chance of reoccurrence.  On the other hand, great progress is being made every day and more importantly I sure appreciate my family and friends like never before in my life.

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Thanks! It's good to hear from someone who has had HAL and to know that its not that bad.

"My urologist gave me the impression that while it was major surgery as long as things went well I would be fine." This is the impression I am getting from mine as well... This may sound dumb but what are the implications of having a tumor with vascular and sinus invasion? Do you see an oncologist now?

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

They believe that a couple of the ways that kidney cancer spreads is by access to either the blood or  lymph systems (there are other ways). The difference between Stage 1/2 and 3, is mainly that the cancer has grown into the blood supply (vascular invasion), or into the adrenal gland, or outside the kidney in some other way. What comes with increases in stage is increases in chances that the cancer will spread to other parts of the body. Roughly a Stage 1 tumor has something like a <10% chance of recurrence (I'm talking about clear cell RCC) while a Stage 3 tumor the probabilty can be closer to 50% chance of it spreading to other parts of the body. They generally don't find out what the tumor has grown into until they remove the kidney and slice it up and put it under microscope and have a pathologist look at it.

I had a Stage 3a tumor that had vascular invasion. Because my risk was higher for recurrence, I was very interested in looking into clinical drug trials. Many of these trials have a 12 week deadline that you have to meet following your nephrectomy. That's why it's important to see a medical oncologist that knows about RCC and drug trials as soon as possible just so you can get the information to consider drug trials. There's often a bunch of tests that have to be done to see if you qualify for the trial, so don't wait until the last minute if you have any interest at all.

Hope this helps.

Todd

Galrim's picture
Galrim
Posts: 274
Joined: Apr 2013

Recurrence risk related to tumor size:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2735023/

Recurrence risk related to general prognostic factors (stage, grade etc):

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1471767/

 

And a quote regarding the percentages you mention:

"After nephrectomy, the incidence of RCC recurrence has been reported to be 7% with a median time of 38 months for T1 tumors, 26% with a median time of 32 months for T2 disease, and 39% with a median time to recurrence at 17 months for T3 tumors."

 

/G

 

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

G please keep those links ready to hand for posting whenever newbies and others appear here and post misleading information about small tumors!  Of particular importance is the finding from studying a few thousand cases, that :

 

Conclusion

In our experience, tumor size is significantly associated with synchronous metastases and asynchronous metastases following nephrectomy. Our results suggest that risk of metastatic disease for patients with tumors <3cm is negligible.

[Just hope we don't have to spell out what negligible means, or explain that "< "  means "smaller than".]

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

I think its more important, when looking at stats, to see where those stats came from...

For example, some of the info in the articles you cite was pulled from a study of patients from as far back as the 70's. As I'm sure you will agree, much has changed since then and advances occur daily. Another study cited for the article followed only 11 patients, not nearly a large enough sample size from which to draw meaningful conclusions.

My point is, rather than blindly believing any statistic or %, one should find out how those numbers were generated. Often, articles can be recently published but simply be a compilation of old data and it is up to the reader to determine if the source is credible/relevant enough for them.

Statistics don't lie, they simply say whatever they need to Undecided

Sorry...I am 95% confident that I have a 50/50 love/hate relationship with statistics....

 lol

 

 

 

Rea's picture
Rea
Posts: 10
Joined: Feb 2013

Hi MeMeJoy!  my hand assisted lap done last Jan 30 2013, it was an 11cm tumor, renal cell carninoma most commonly known as kidney cancer, T3A.  I was back to work after 5 weeks and had good results in my bone and CT scan last March. i am cancer free now.  i still need to do tests every 3 months.

the recovery is quicker compare to open surgery. i still have some sharp pain on my lower incision and in my flank where the kidney and tumor was removed.  so far, it was good.  i am still awaiting what excercises i can do cause i tend to be exhausted easily. i can say i am back to normal activities, just no heavy lifting

i pray that your surgery will be sucessful, keep up the positive attitude. everything will be ok.

DonMiller's picture
DonMiller
Posts: 96
Joined: Feb 2013

Some good advise from the folks on the board

 

I had my surgery on October 5, 2012   11CM  T3a  Fuhrman grade 3 with sinus & venos invasion.   No symtoms  No sick days in 30 years at work.  

The surgery was really not that bad.  I was in the hospital for 2 days.  On the first day I had some trouble breathing because of the gas and and  had some significant pain for a few days....although pain medication worked fine and I pretty much just laid on the couch and watched reruns of Law and Order & The Closer.

I was back at work in two weeks although I got tired by the middle of the afternoon...should have taken another week off.

My big mistake was listening to the optimistic urolgists and ultimtely passing deadlines on available clinical trials.  My only advise would be to see an oncologist before the surgery if at all possible.  There are treatments that must be arranged for before the surgery or shortly thereafter.  I did not take advantage of these.

 

Good luck you will be fine

 

Don 

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Good advice indeed! Everyone on here is so helpful and respectful of one another.

Luckily I don't have to worry about work. I work at the university but only part time and during the spring and fall when I am enrolled in class.  I am a bit worried that they may try and rush me out of the hospital though. I don't think I'd be comfortable with a 2 day stay honestly, it just doesn’t seem long enough to determine that everything is ok after they remove an organ lol

I don't know how I feel about clinical trials....I know there are a ton of people who recommend getting involved in them and are happy that they did so, but I don't know if I feel comfortable with doing that. I don't know why exactly, maybe just because I don't like taking meds period...the thought of taking something that hasn't been proven weird’s me out lol To each their own I guess Cool

I’ve thought about renewing my subscription to Netflix just for at least the week after my surgery lol

Thanks again everyone!

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

It's a personal decision, and if you don't feel comfortable, don't do it. We've had some very long discussions/debates on this issue. Search through and find them if you're interested. We were pretty well split. Many people don't feel comfortable with doing a drug trial and don't do them. I'm sure there are people that have done trials and aren't happy they did them too, btw. I know one for sure whom I met. He was on a trial for votrient and his cancer progressed and it turned out he was on the placebo. He wasn't happy about that. It is not an easy decision.

I didn't want to go home after 2 days. They sent me home without even having had bowel sounds or bowel activity (which many at other hospitals say they didn't do that) and I was not happy about it. But it turned out ok. I was even able to walk up and down the stairs at my house the day I got home (but I avoided it). I had a friend stay a couple of days, but I really didn't need it. I was able to take care of myself. I had my son come by every 2-3 days to do some shopping for me or move things that I couldn't lift, etc. but for the most part I was self sufficient when I got home.

Todd

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

I can't imagine it is an easy decision...Hopefully it's not one I will have to make! But I feel that may be wishful thinking... It's good to know there are others out there going through the same emotions/issues - NOT that I would wish this on anyone! - but...you know what I mean though?? lol

My house has a lot of stairs but I think I may just camp out in the living room for a few days :)

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

I have a large bed and very large bath en suite with 2 sinks, but on the second floor. Temporarily, I turned my bath into a combo bath/kitchen for about a month. I put a small fridge and a microwave there, and brought a few dishes, canned good, etc. upstairs so I could remain in my bedroom for the first 2-3 weeks and avoid the stairs. I arranged this before the surgery. I was glad I did this. It came in very handy until I felt like doing the stairs regularly. These kinds of appliances are so inexpensive nowadays. The $150 I spent on this was well worth it.

Todd

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

I am very fortunate in that my husband works from home (hes a Sr. Software engineer) so Im pretty sure that where ever I decide to make base camp it'll work out. The only catch is the bathrooms, they are all either upstairs or down - none on the main level lol

MDCinSC's picture
MDCinSC
Posts: 574
Joined: Feb 2013

This has been very enlightening for me!  I appreciate all the candor. 

My hand assist is two weeks from today!  Mine is, by all accounts fairly small (about 4.7 cm) and I am hoping to be back in the classroom (one day a week for four hours) in two weeks. Am I pushing it?  I sure see mixed tales here!  I'll share more as I know it, but I am doing my level best to be positive and aggressive with the recovery.

Thanks again!

 

Michael

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

I go in next week so Ill let you know lol

My doc told me I may want to avoid driving for 2 weeks after the surgery and no heavy lifting for a month. (this is seeming more and more like a C-section every day Surprised)

What do you teach? Or are you a student?

 

MDCinSC's picture
MDCinSC
Posts: 574
Joined: Feb 2013

I can't say I have much experience in that! LOL  However for ME to hav a child it would HAVE to be C-section!

todd121
Posts: 575
Joined: Dec 2012

As I remember my doctor said no driving for 4 weeks. Even riding in a car was uncomfortable for the first 2-3 weeks. The bouncing and shaking were painful. I don't think it's that regular driving is stressful on the body per se, I think it has more to do with what might happen if you were to get into an accident or need to respond swiftly with an energetic response to avoid something. That was my take on the advice not to drive. I think I did start driving at 3 weeks though (short trips).

I was very glad I didn't go back to work until 6 weeks. My work involves sitting all day, and that was the most uncomfortable position for me. It put a lot of stress on the suture area. I was most comfortable standing or laying. I got tired very easily. I think I would have been ok to work 3-4 hours a day after 4 weeks, but not full time. I took a trip to Vegas (and even drove part of the way) at 3 weeks. I did ok, but rested and was careful not to overdo it. It's about a 4 hour drive each way with no traffic (but I think it took us longer because of holiday traffic) and I drove half the way each direction.

Walking was very good for me. After 1 week I was going for walks outside and pushed myself to walk a little farther each day. I think this helped my recovery. This was based on advice I got from people here.

Todd

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Michael, you'll doubtless listen to your doc's advice and pay close attention to what your body is telling you but that doesn't sound an unreasonable expectation.

By the way, do you happen to have a GRAF gene mutation?

MDCinSC's picture
MDCinSC
Posts: 574
Joined: Feb 2013

Nope!  Just can't hold tall drinks of Lagavulin! :)

 

I am a 66 year old college prof.  I teach in the Humanities, Communication and English!  My PhD is actually in Theatre as a historian.

 

Not bad for a fella who was a beginning freshman when he was 46! ;)

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Not bad at all :)

I'm a full time student - finish my first bachelors next spring, and I teach supplemental instruction during the fall and spring for a prof who has also become a good friend of mine.

Even though I haven't had the surgery yet, (come'on Thursday!) I don't think I would be able to handle all the walking around campus that was required this semester soon after. Thankfully I will finish my last final on Wednesday, so I have the whole summer for recovery!

Djinnie's picture
Djinnie
Posts: 769
Joined: Apr 2013

Hi MeMe,

Just wanted to wish you all the best for Thursday, it will soon be over now. I look forward to reading your postings....post op.  I will be raising a glass of red, or two, for you.

 

Djinnie

 

 

MeMeJoy
Posts: 68
Joined: Apr 2013

Thanks so much! We are about to head out for my last real meal for a few days. :) I am not looking forward to all the *fun* stuff I get to drink tomorrowFrown but am sooo looking forward to moving forward! I probably wont post tomorrow but I will post soon after  - promiseWink This site, and all the people here, have been so wonderful and helpful! I hope that my story can be as helpul to someone someday!!

Thanks again!

 

cran1's picture
cran1
Posts: 128
Joined: Mar 2013

Good luck MeMe! My partial went very well as your surgery will to.

Blueraidermike
Posts: 16
Joined: May 2013

MeMe

 

good luck, I will lift you up in my prayers.   I am 12 weeks out from my open partial and I feel great.    You will get thru this!

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 1901
Joined: Oct 2011

Good luck MeMe. We're all pulling for you.

MDCinSC's picture
MDCinSC
Posts: 574
Joined: Feb 2013

I'm counting on you to set the standard for me to follow!  This time next week, I'll be heavily sedated and hopefully sleeping soundly!

 

Kick some RCC butt tomorrow!!!

 

Michael

Galrim's picture
Galrim
Posts: 274
Joined: Apr 2013

...oh I remember that night before surgery..."Night of the living Colon monster from outer space" :-D

Bad jokes aside, Im sure all will go well and that you will be back on your feet in no time. Take care and good luck with the surgery :-)

/G

gatorgirl11
Posts: 5
Joined: Jun 2013

I hope all is well Meme! How did it go?

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