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Wifes Surgery just finished but question about lymph nodes, PLEASE HELP !!

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

My wife had a bilateral mastectomy today and just came out of surgery, during the surgery they did a sentinal node mapping and biopsy. The surgon said two nodes showed positive so they took all of them out of her arm. My concern is that she had chemo BEFORE surgery so obviously it didn't kill everything. Will she have to go through chemo again ?  The Surgon wouldn't answer the question when I asked him and just said we have to wait until the path report comes back..  Any one out there have a similar experiance, Positive lymph nodes found AFTER chemo? I am praying she doesn't have to suffer through chemo again. Thank you all.

 

Dennis

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Has anyone had radiation with tissue expanders

Patti1967
Posts: 186
Joined: Mar 2013

Sorry to hear that, wish I could be of more help, I had my chemo after, I had one positive found during surgery and they removed 10 more on that side.  I will tell you  her recovery will probably be a little longer now, having those nodes removed is rough.  I hope someone comes along soon who can answer your question from experience.  Again, prayers to you both. 

Patti

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Patti,

Thank you so much for the reply. I just hope she doesn't develop lymphadema for them taking the nodes or have to go through chemo again. God Bless

tufi000's picture
tufi000
Posts: 468
Joined: Jun 2005

I had 8 rounds of chemo prior to surgery. Surgery pathology results were 15 nodes out of 17 positive for cancer.  Then I had rads. That was 11 years ago and so far so good.  Sooo she will be staged too and its okay to tell the Doc that though she does this all the time it is your first and traumatic time so a bit of softening would be appreciated.  They are aware they have tendencies toward the G-d complex.  Let her know you are equals and she works for you without being angry.

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi  Tufi,

Thank you so much for your reply. We hope that she will not have to go through any more chemo and only rads. She is doing much better today, in good spirits, smiling and slowly walking around. I'm so happy to hear that you have been 11 years NED :)

CatsBoys
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2013

Yes I had radiation with tissue expanders last fall.  The important thing is to keep putting the "lotion" on as much as possible.  I had radiation in the a.m. and before I put my clothes back on, I applied Radiaplex.  It is a prescription.  I would then put a light cotton v-neck tshirt on.  (You can get packs of mens white t-shirts inexpensively).  I then would put the lotion on again late afternoon.  I would take my shower at night and put it on again after the shower.  This allowed it to soak in over night. 

Keep applying the lotion as much as you can.  Start as soon as you have radiation.  I had 35 radiation sessions.  The last week when they do targetted radiation, I finally started to blister.  Another important tip is to lie down with no clothes on and have a ceiling fan on.  It pulls the heat out.  As a reference point, I have very fair sensitive English skin.  The radiaologist was very worried about how my skin would react.  Therefore we were very proactive with the lotions. 

Another tip, I always took my IPOD in with me so that I could remove myself mentally from the treatment.

Good Luck!  You will be fine.

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Thanks for the reply. My wife is a red head with fair skin also/ Hopefully if she has rads she wont burn. God Bless

Rague
Posts: 3383
Joined: Aug 2009

Not all of us have 'boosters/targeted' rads and we are all different and different things' work for us.  We have all done the best we could to handle our rad issues.  Mine were after but I too have very light skin (I'm a many generation American but my ancestor is primarily German and Irish - so have very light skin, green eyes and dark hair).  I BURNED very bad after the en of rads (have the scars to prove it).  I did nothing 'wrong' - I'm glad that waht you did worked for you - but that is not the 'answer' for all!

Winyan - The Power Within

Susan 

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Gabe N Abby Mom
Posts: 2415
Joined: Sep 2010

That was me...I was scheduled chemo first (6 roundsTAC), then surgery (bilateral w/axillary, no reconstruction) then rads (44 rounds 2x/day).  The surgeon removed 14 lymph nodes, 12 were positive.  I asked the onc about more chemo and was told I'd had the maximum amount of TAC...If I had known more then I would have asked for a different kind. 

I think waiting (as hard as it is) for the pathology to make this is decision is wise.  That report may change your Onc's plan for your wife.  Be sure to ask for a copy of the path report, and read it.  Then ask the doc for any clarification you might need.  I keep copies of all path and scan reports.  I think you should also find out if your wife's positive nodes were level 1, 2, or 3.  (In this particular case the level refers to their location.  Level 1 is closest to the breast.)

I don't know if this helps you.  If you have more questions, please feel free to send me a pm.  I hope recovery goes smoothly and swiftly for your wife. 

Hugs,

Linda 

 

 

Double Whammy's picture
Double Whammy
Posts: 2336
Joined: Jun 2010

Dennis, I want to shed a potential positive light on this.  You said "2 nodes were positive", so they took them.  It may be that 2 nodes took the die they injected and were identified as sentinel nodes, so they took them and had a look at them.  Period.  Usually when nodes are positive for cancer at the time of surgery, they will remove more nodes to be sure they cancer has not spread to other nodes.  They don't typically stop at 2 if they were positive for cancer at the time of surgery.  I had 2 nodes that took up the die, so they removed both.  Neither of them had cancer on initial pathology so they did not remove any more.  Happily,  they were also negative for cancer on the final pathology.    I'm hoping this is the case for your wife.  Get clarification of what was meant by "positive". 

Wishing you the best.

Suzanne

Gabe N Abby Mom's picture
Gabe N Abby Mom
Posts: 2415
Joined: Sep 2010

Good advice Suzanne...I didn't even think about that!

 

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Suzanne,

Thank you so much for the reply, I think the exact words the Surgeon used were two nodes were positive so we took all  of the nodes in her arm. When I asked how many that was she replied" we won't know until the path report gets back". With that being said it led me to believe that two of the nodes were positive for cancer so the removed all of them just in case. I am praying that none of them are cancerous but my fears are that they will be and what will we do next?  I do not like her Surgical Onc, she is very arragant and acts like she is being bothered when I ask her questions, but aparently she is the best surgical Onc in VA, but certainly not the best  in the personality or compassion department 

Double Whammy's picture
Double Whammy
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Joined: Jun 2010

but it doesn't sound like it, Dennis.  Take one step at a time if you can and try not to worry about the what ifs until you know what they are.  I know the waiting is very difficult (we've all been there), but the time will evenually pass and everyone (including the arrogant oncologist) will be waiting for the final pathology in order to formulate a treatment plan for your wife.  Surgeons are all typically arrogant, no matter what their specialty.  I guess they just have a lot of self esteem!  As long as you TRUST the ability of her health care team, that is the most important thing.  And it never ever hurts to get a second opinion.  There's usually plenty of time.  As patients we want this thing taken care of asap, but often (not always) there is plenty of time to seek a second opinion.  I believe one of the most important things is faith in our health care team.

Good luck.  Hugs to your wife.

Suzanne

SIROD's picture
SIROD
Posts: 2204
Joined: Jun 2010

"Surgeon used were two nodes were positive so we took all  of the nodes in her arm"

 

Just so you know there are 3 levels of axilliary lymph nodes in the arm.  Level 1 closest to the breast and more than likely where the cancer would hit first .  Most surgeon take as mine stated a sampling.  There like grapes, you don't count how many you take or buy in the bunch.

I had my first lymph node dissection with a mammogram with positive nodes.  There was no such thing in 1994 as a sentinel node biopsy.  I believe they counted 27 or some such number.  The 4 years later, I had a 2.4 cm tumor (not lymph node) that wrapped itself around the axilliary vein.  I insisted that the tumor be removed (dumb on my part and no one and they all tried to talk me out of it).  I had a 2nd lymph node dissection at level 2.  Level 1 was lower in scar tissue.  He did remove all of level 2 nodes given the size of the tumor and took a few of level 3 nodes.

I've had 2 lymph node dissections, 4 bouts of cellulitis (bad enough to be given antibiotics by IV in and a hospital stay), I travelled considerably never wore a sleeve or was even fitted for one.  18 1/2 years later did I developed lymphedema.  I do have chronic bursitis, a full thickness tear of the supraspinatus tendon in the rotator cuff and neuropathy in the arm.  I believe the 2nd lymph node dissection is what cause my problems.  I would advise never, never to do what I did.

You can look up levels of axilliary nodes on the internet and you will find there are 3 levels.  .No surgeon would remove all those levels of lymph nodes.  A person does need some nodes.

I did have radiation in the axilla all the way up to the jaw bone.  Radiation killed the saliva gland on the lower left bottom of my mouth.  A year later all teeth, fillings collapsed at the same moment.  I have a bridge there today.  The cancer had already spread to my ribs .I had been on Tamoxifen for four years and 3 of the bouts of cellulitis were the warnings that there was a blockage.  Sort of a plumbing problem and the infection was a backup of the bacteria not being absorb by the lymph system in the proper way.  While on antibiotics, my arm was raised (like the statue of liberty) to allow the infection to flow out.  The 4th one happened 7 years later both to my total surprise and my surgeon.  I had an infected hang nail.  Since then -- so far so good.

Wish you and your wife the best of luck.  May she remain cancer free with no recurrence after this one ordeal with breast cancer.  

Doris

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Doris,

Thank you so much for the very detailed and informative post. I certainly did not know all of that information about the lymph nodes. Hopefully we will find out more on Tuesday when we go back to the surgeon for the final path report. Again, thank you so much for your post. God Bless You

 

Dennis

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Doris,

Thank you so much for the very detailed and informative post. I certainly did not know all of that information about the lymph nodes. Hopefully we will find out more on Tuesday when we go back to the surgeon for the final path report. Again, thank you so much for your post. God Bless You

 

Dennis

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi LInda,

It is great to hear form you again, we were all getting worried. Thank you so much for the reply. When you mention you had TAC is that Taxol?  My wife did 4 rounds of  DD A/C then 4 DD of taxol but no RADS. We will wait to see her Onc until the path report comes back but I am just worried.  On another note, how are you doing? God Bless.

 

Dennis

carkris's picture
carkris
Posts: 4529
Joined: Aug 2009

They never know how many nodes the take until the path because taking them out is random, they go in take some tissue. I know my doc xrayed them to see if he got enough. O dod not have an atronmical amount taken but only have slight managable swelling .

Josie21
Posts: 364
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Dennis,

I am so sorry that the waiting game has now begun for you and your wife.  You both want answers and you can't get any.  It's horrible, but you will get your answers followed by a game plan.  No matter what it is, I have no doubt that with your support your wife can get through this.  Please let us know how she is doing and please take care of yourself too.  My breast cancer took its toll on my husband as well as myself.  You are both in my thoughts and prayers.

Sending hugs to both of you,

Ginny

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VickiSam
Posts: 8497
Joined: Aug 2009

as you and your wife are in a holding pattern until you actually get in to see your Specialist/Doctor.  I had a bilaterateral, with tissue expanders -- chemo completed B4 my surgery.  I had a total of 6 lymph nodes removed -- all negative.

My suggestion:

Take a tape recorder, note pad with you to your appointment -- as the next few days unfold, write down any, and all questions you current have.  Remember, no question, comment or concern is silly -  Ask the question over and over, again if you do not get a clear and concise answers.

Just a few suggestions for your wife to aid in recovery --

Have her take pain medication when necessary.

Multiple pillows in various, sizes help with sleeping on your back. Your wife will need help getting into, and out of bed for a week or so.

No DRIVING for a 7 to 14 days.

Please have cups, saucers, plates at arm level - as well as re-arranging your fridge for more commonly used items at arm levels. Tide/Downy small container sizes - also at arm level. Reaching up and grabbing heavy items -- will tear your stitches, as well as hurt your arms. Muscles and tissue in breast, as well as arm areas will be cut, moved and sewn back together.

I tried to take a bath ..but hence could not pull myself out of the our spa tub, no muscles or strength in my arms after bilateral mastectomy to pull myself out of the bath tub.. I DO NOT do well with the sponge bath only -- == . So I opted to shower ...My husband removed our shower head, and replaced it with a flex hose type so I could shower maneuvering the flex hose from waist down, as well as place shower water under my arms, without saturating my bandages with water and soap.

Lastly, please make sure you do your exercises as prescribed by Plastic Surgeon, and Physical Therapist.

Strength, Courage, Hope and Speedy recovery.

Vicki Sam

 

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi VIkki,

Thank you so much for the great advice, I will put on the hose shower head as soon as we get home. I will also get her a wedge pillow for sleeping on her back. We hope to be able to go home tomorrow. SHe is still in a good bit of pain but in great spirits, smiling and begining to walk around slowly. Her Drs all say she is doing great. The fuid in her drains have almost no blood in them.. all great signs the Drs say. God Bless.

 

Dennis

PennyJ's picture
PennyJ
Posts: 31
Joined: Dec 2012

Hi Dennis,

I am so sorry that you and your wife are going through this.  Hang on to the thought that chemo and mastectomies are usually the roughest part of the treatment.  I had chemo before surgery, AC x4 and Taxol x1 but had to stop after the 1st Taxol as I was hospitalized twice for side effects (once for AC and once for Taxol).  My medical oncologist recommended proceding w/ my double mastectomy as my tumor had shrunk so much (from 11cm to almost non detectible) and chemo was making me so sick.  Postop I found that I had 4 out of 18 positive lymph nodes (I knew some were + going in) and the recommendation was to complete the chemo using Abaxane instead of Taxol and then to proceed w/ radiation.  Since your wife has completed her recommended chemo regime, I suspect that she will move forward to radiation from here.  Also, I had radiation w/ my tissue expanders in and it was fine, just the expected skin irritation/burns. 

Some thoughts that might help:

  1. If your surgeon is unapproachable, there may be other staff members in his/her office such as a physician's assistant, nurse practitioner or RN (not a medical assistant) who can help to listen to your concerns and answer your questions.  These folks work w/ breast cancer patients regularly and are usually very knowlegable.
  2. If you have been receiveing treatment through a cancer center, they should have a nurse navagator, a nurse who helps guide cancer patients through every stage of treatment and can explain pathology/surgical reports and what to expect next.  The nurse navagator usually works closely w/ the medical oncologist and surgeon so they are "in the loop" about your wife's condition.  If you don't have access to a nurse navagator, then a case manager through the hospital or your doctor's office can do many of the same things.
  3. It is ok to contact your medical oncologist's office w/ this questions as well.  They should be willing to help.
  4. I really understand your worry about lymphedema.  If you haven't had at least 1 visit w/ a physical therapist who specializes in lymphedema prevention and treatment, this is a good place to start.  Then, when your wife is ok'd to start the lymphedema exercises, do them faithfully.  I felt like a T-Rex at first (only able to use forearms that didn't move much--no wonder they became extinct!) but now at 1 year postop I have full range of motion of both arms and no problems w/ lymphedema (so far).

I hope this helps.  Your wife is very fortunate to have you in her corner!  My husband was absolute wonderful during my illness, I don't know how I would have done it without him.

Sending good thoughts your way and please let us know how you both are progressing,

Penny

 

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Penny,

Thak you so  much for the reply and great advice. We are at the VCU cancer center in Richmond Va. They have been great so far. He nurse navigator is awsome as is her plastic surgeon, as stated before I just do not like her Surg Onc.  She doing much better today. She is istill in pain but in good spirits, smiling and begining to walk around slowly. Hopefully we will go home tomorrow. Thanks again. God bless

 

Dennis

CathyACK
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi Dennis,

I have been reading your concerns with regard to the lymph nodes and the oncologist.  I have to share that my oncologist was very difficult, she  gave orders.  I made it clear that any decisions were mine, she was not in charge.  After two very stressful appointments I asked for another person and I have been dealing with her resident.  She is wonderful and less "used to" telling people what will be needed.  I think perhaps dealing with this full time can make some doctors numb to the things they are saying. 

I also found great compassion with the nurses, when I last went in to hear whether or not Chemo would be needed, they rushed up and hugged me.  They make the visits tolerable. I realize being in the best place is important which is why I am still going to my cancer center, but there are people there that understand what you are feeling, I am sure you will find them. 

God Bless, I hope you are both home soon, that is the best medicine.

Cathy

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Thanks Cathy, we should be going home tomorrow, she is doing really good today. We will just be nervously waiting on the final path report. Waiting is the worst. God Bless

CathyACK
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi Dennis,

I agree with Vicki Sam, bring a tape recorder or use your phone, I brought paper and a pen but during these appointments one is so stressed that taking notes doesn't happen. 

God Bless,

Cathy

Patti1967
Posts: 186
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi Dennis

So glad she is doing well! 

Patti

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Thanks Patti, she is doing great today, still in some pain but her spirits are high, she is smiling and laughing and I arranged for her friend she hadn't seen in a few years to make a suprise visit this afternoon, I went walking around for a few hours to allow them some "girl time" . I have taken next week off from work and my mother who is a RN will be staying for two weeks or more if needed.

Patti1967
Posts: 186
Joined: Mar 2013

How sweet!  Are friends are great spirit lifters!

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

They were so glad to see each other, they were both in tears or joy

New Flower
Posts: 4131
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi Dennis,

 You have gotten a lot of good suggestins, I am not sure I might repeat what otehr sisters have said:

  • Please ask for copies of "pathology report" Surgery report", two separate documents which will help you and your wife to understand the situation and future treatment.Usually given at post-surgical check up visit.
  • Recovery is a very important step and Drains are too. make sure that draind are taking care of and are not pooled before liquid is minimal (you will be given instructions and measuring cups. 
  • Rage of motion can be a challenge since most of lymph nodes were taken out. Please ask your surgeoun for referral to Physical therapist, who will help her working on her arm. Usually 1 month after the surgery If healing goes well.
  •  Based on your wife's pathology report her Medical oncologist will make recommendations on her next treatment plan. Please keep an open mind about additional Chemo. Every person medical case is unique, what works for some, is not relevant to others. If tumor Estrogen positive or Her2 positive there additional are treatments which follow Chemo and radiation, For those cases positive nodes are less concerning.

While your surgeoun is not approchable, she did a very good job determining during your wife's mastectomy mastectomy that additional lymph nodes needed to be removed, so everything was done at once durinng ongoing surgery.

I have had 21 nodes removed, 11 were positive. I had Chemo after my surgery.

Wishing easy healing for your wife and good pathology report

New Flower 

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

I can't really answer your question because, back in 1987, they did surgery first.  I had a large tumor and 4 + nodes and then underwent chemo, radiation and tamoxifen.  Just wanted to say that after 26 years, I am still here (although still fighting).  Hang in there!!!

jendrey's picture
jendrey
Posts: 377
Joined: Sep 2009

I had radiation with a tissue expander and didn't experience any problems while undergoing the therapy. However, I have since had a multitude of problems due to the skin being radiated. For instance, I had an open wound for 7 months which included two debridements. Personally, had the doctor told me (and I did ask lots about long term effects) that rads would practically exclude a reasonably acceptable reconstruction, I never would have agreed to the radiation. But, I am in the minority with this notion.

FYI - It took a long time (months) for the feeling to come back all the way in my arm from the lymph nodes being removed!

Taking a pad and pen to appointments is a great idea. I took it a little further and got one of those spy pens from eBay for about $20 and just surreptitiously recorded my doctors! (I can't even read my own writing, it really is that bad!)

Hoping for a speedy recovery for your wife. =)

Hope this helps.

(((Hugs)))

 

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi CC,

Great to hear form you again. You were so helpful when we first got on this crazy train back in October. We were hoping that the double mast and the reconstruction would be the final stop, but the two positive nodes has gotten me really worried again.  How are you doing ?

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Thanks everyone for all of the comments and support, we came home from the hospital today and my princess is doing very well,she is sleeping in her favorite recliner, she  is still hurting and sleeping alot. I made her Potatoe soup and fresh buttermilk biscuts for dinner. Tonight we start he excersises to keep mobility back in her arms. She wanted a glass of wine when we got home and it broke my heart to tell her no because of the pain meds she is on. Maybe I'll give her a little sip tonight with dinner. Happy Easter everyone. God Bless

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1862
Joined: Jul 2009

A handsome man bringing her soup and fresh biscuits...sigh...she's a lucky lady to have you to care for her!

Dennis, I actually clicked on this thread to compliment you on your profile picture, and what a lovely couple you are...now I see you've changed your profile picture to yet ANOTHER beautiful picture!  Do y'all ever take a bad picture? Smile

Traci

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Traci,

Thank you for the compliments, she is the love of my life and my best friend and I am so scared of loosing her. I do take quite a few bad pictures but she always makes me look good.  I hope you are doing well and I look forward to keeping in touch with you and all of the other wonderful men and women on this forum. God bless and Happy Easter

 

Dennis

burcu123
Posts: 70
Joined: Jan 2013

I had chemo before surgery also. I did a lot of medical literature search and found that chemo before surgery does not influence node status. Meaning it was not expected for chemo to change or kill the cells in lymph nodes. However chemo significantly improves survival whether given before or after surgery. There seems to be a trend to give chemo prior to surgery nowadays. It may help to reconstruc breast better by shrinking the tumor in the breast.

I did not get radiation. i do not think your wife is going to get more chemo , however the last word will belong to the oncologist. If she was ER positive she will need hormonal treatment but that is nothing like chemo

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Burcu,

Thank you so much for your reply. That makes me feel better. My heart sank when the surgeon said they found two positive nodes during the SLN mapping and biopsy. I guess I was under the false hope that the chemo would kill everything and all we had left was to take the source out. Did you have any positive nodes after your surgery? Thanks for your reply. Happy Easter.

 

Dennis

burcu123
Posts: 70
Joined: Jan 2013

I was lucky that my nodes were negative, that is how I avoided radiation therapy. Altough chemo do not change node status it does kill cancer cells that may have gone to other parts of the body.

Rague
Posts: 3383
Joined: Aug 2009

You haven't said what type of BC your wife is - IBC/DCIS/IDC/LCIS/ILC - or her HER2 or ER/PR status is.  All that makes  difference in ongoing TX (treatment).

I haven't posted because I did not have BMX or recon at time of surgery.  I'm IBC (Inflammatory BC) so recon was not an optionat at time of surgery.  Personally, I did 4 DD A/C neoadjuvant, mod. rad. mast., 12 weekly Taxol adjuvant followed by 25 rads., Femara/letrozole since.  My TX plan was different than most other IBCers here but at this time 3+ yrs post TX and nothing stops me from doing anything I want to do with Hubby.  For me, all nodes taken out at suregery were positive (already knew node involvement) but as far as I know I'm still NED (No evidence of Disease) .  Talk to her Chemo Dr about what might be needed - surgeons do not always know anything along those 'lines'.    Surgeons 'cut' out' but they are only part of the whole TX plan.

Winyan - The Power Within

Susan

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Hi Susan,

Thanks for the reply. Sorry I forgot to put what type of cancer she had. She was diagnosed with stage2 grade 3 IDC. Her 2 neg, partially estrogen receptive (50%). I'm so glad you are NED. I am still confused as to what exactly IBC is when compared to IDC. Thank again for your reply. God bless.

 

Dennis

Les2
Posts: 3
Joined: Apr 2013

Hi Dennis,

I, too, had a double mastectomy (DCIS stage 1) in January 2012, with reconstruction. During my initial healing, I was able to connect with someone who underwent the same surgery, which was so helpful.

I learned, by trial and error, a lot of tips and tricks to manage the discomfort and how to be comfortable as the days and weeks passed.

I've got a year under my belt and happy to share any info with you :)

Les2

carkris's picture
carkris
Posts: 4529
Joined: Aug 2009

My rads onc did not want to radiate reconstructed breasts so i had to have an expander removed.

IDC ivasive ductal, and IBC Inflamatory breast cancer. Even if your nodes are positive, you can do just fine, it determines your treatment. (as you can see by the ladies here who have done just fine)

Patti1967
Posts: 186
Joined: Mar 2013

Hope all is still well:) Please keep us posted:)

Patti

Rague
Posts: 3383
Joined: Aug 2009

(A USMC friend told me that it's "OK" as an USA/WAAC to say that to a Marine.  Hubby's a retired USN 'Rigger')

I don't know enough about IDC (Invasive/Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma) to compare it to IBC (Inflammatory Breast Cancer) but I can give you a bit of an overview of what IBC is.

IBC is rarer as only somewhere between 1% and 5% of all BCs are IBC.  It is the most aggressive form with a 5 yr survival rate of only 25%.  It is almost always at least Stage III and often IV when DX'd.  It does not form lumps but makes 'nests/bands' that are often/usually not detected on mammos.  Neo-adjuvant chemo is done to try to get it to from a 'lump' for surgery.  It can literally present itself overnight.

Winyan - The Power Within

Susan

chantal44
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2013

HI,SORRY TO HEAR THAT THEY HAD FOUND THE cancer in 2 of my lymph nodes and they  took all of them out of that arm and the only thing i had to do after the surgery was go for the radiation which is for 40 treatments 5 days a week and you cross your fingers that it doesn't burn you to the point were they have to take a break

 

 

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Thank you all for the repies, it certainly helps ease the anxiety of the waiting game. God Bless.

 

Dennis

dthompson's picture
dthompson
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

Thank you for all of the comments. God Bless You all.

 

Dennis

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Marcia527
Posts: 2735
Joined: Jul 2006

I had chemo before surgery. There were still two knodes with cancer out of fifteen removed. My surgeon who said after surgery I'd just have radiation, changed his mind and said I'd need four more cycles of chemo. First four cycles were A/c and second four cycles were Taxal. Than I had six weeks of radiation. I had large tumors . I was stage three with grade three Tumors.

 

I was diagnosed in 2003. 

 

 

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