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when it rains...

LaCh
Posts: 514
Joined: Dec 2012

When it rains, it pours. After several scheduling fiascos, they've ended up with what might be the biggest, which is my day Monday: first radiation Tx and straight from there to the port implantation and straight from THAT to the first chemo Tx, all in one day. Someone dropped the ball if you asked me. This doesn't seem like the ideal way to do this.
Has anyone else had it done like this?

Also soliciting reactions to the initial chemo infusion (which is the most worrisome part for me) and one more thing.. In all this, I forgot to ask the chemo onc how long the infusion of Mitomycin takes and how long it takes to hook up the pump... So... how long do these things take?

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 2940
Joined: Jan 2010

While I can understand not wanting to start chemo and rad the day of your port insertion, this is not uncommon.

As for how long the chemo infusion takes, the Mito and the two anti-nausea drips given to me prior to the Mito only took about 2 hours or so. Hooking up the pump is a simple thing and will take only a few minutes.

I faired pretty well during the first round of chemo--just a little nausea and fatigue during the first week.

LaCh
Posts: 514
Joined: Dec 2012

Thanks mp... this is good to know....
Thanks.

Marynb
Posts: 1134
Joined: Aug 2012

That is exactly the way it is done at the top rated hospital I go to. It is a long day, but only happens twice during this treatment. It works out fine. For me the infusion only took about a half an hour. Sme people are also infused with anti nausea and steroids. I was not. My body was always sensitive to chemicals, but I did just fine with the chemo. Hopefully, you will do fine too.

Think positive thoughts. You will do fine. You will beat this. You will be healed by spring. You will live a happy and full life.

LaCh
Posts: 514
Joined: Dec 2012

Hey marynb... I also pay close attention to your responses because you've said that your body is hyper sensitive to drugs like miine is....
Anyway... I've had a difficult life, like most people have, I think, but I've also had a happy life, so I have that under my belt. As for the Spring... yes, it'll be a sweet Spring indeed....

Tyson
Posts: 5
Joined: Aug 2012

I don't know if I'm the best one to respond to your answer. But I'm only six months post treatment. I did not have a port because I took pills but did take the mytomycin. So they had to start an Iv in my arm. Was only in there a few hours for everything. Not to bad at all. Got a little nauseated. But not bad. Hope that helps a little. Good luck with everything. You will get threw this. We all are here for you. Take care Sandy

LaCh
Posts: 514
Joined: Dec 2012

Thanks Tyson... good to know...

pamela_preib's picture
pamela_preib
Posts: 51
Joined: Nov 2012

I'm having a picc line, chemo and radiation on the 20th. What's the difference between a port and a picc?

Jo Joy
Posts: 39
Joined: Oct 2012

All of these procedures require a sterile field and people will be swabbing down everything and using masks. A PICC line is a temporary IV like thing they put in your arm. It stays in for about 6 weeks . This can be inserted with a localized injection of lidocaine in a heart cath lab or radiology OR room. It is done with an ultrasound to locate a good vein in your arm and then threaded to a major vein in your neck and down by your heart. Proper placement is confirmed with an portable X-ray machine to make sure it is placed correctly. A port is inserted under your skin on your chest during a surgical procedure under anesthesia in an outpatient OR. The line is threaded thru a major vein and down near your heart. I had neither of these. I had what is called a TICC line or more commonly known as a tunneled subclavian central line. It was like being a Borg because there was a small IV line coming directly out of my chest with 2 IV connectors on it. There is an increased chance of infection with this one and I had to get weekly dressing changes. (Tegaderm became my friend becuause I could shower with them covering it. They tried to do a PICC insertion but my veins in my upper arm would not cooperate. They asked me if I wanted to have it in my chest and I went for it cause I didn't want to wait to have outpatient surgery for the Port.

Care wise and less chance of infection - the Port is the way to go. U can shower and not be concerned about it. I have a 50 year old friend that is stage IV colon cancer and has had her port in for five years now.

Marynb
Posts: 1134
Joined: Aug 2012

I had a picc line which was removeed after the first round of treatment. A new picc was inserted for each round of chemo.

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