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Question from breast cancer board -- any thoughts about pink ribbons & October?

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

Hello, all -

I'm a 3-year breast cancer survivor, and an active member of the CSN breast cancer board. I hope you don't mind my sticking my head in here with a question for any of you who might like to share your thoughts?

On October 28th, I'm leading a worship service at my church to honor all cancer survivors, and we’re very intentionally holding this service in October, when breast cancer gets all the attention, to do what we can to make the month a tiny bit more inclusive, and to talk about how this month feels to survivors of other forms of cancer.

I would love to hear any of your thoughts on this issue: Do you have any feelings about all the pink ribbons everywhere you look in October, or about all the attention that breast cancer receives, or the whole fuzzy issue of "awareness"?

As a breast cancer survivor, I realize that I have my own perspective and biases, and would love to be able to speak from a slightly wider perspective.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts you'd like to share,

Traci

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 4262
Joined: Feb 2009

Ribbons are a lovely gesture to symbolize a terrible disease but us colon people get very little recognition and our cancer is the second highest death rate and so cureable. Of course we couldn't have a month dedicated to every cancer because there are many. I'm glad that breast cancer gets so much attention (my mom died of it), but just wish there was more awareness for the others. Good luck to you and your event.

Kim

janie1
Posts: 753
Joined: Apr 2011

Hello, nice to meet you.

Just want to say how very, very sad that more hasn't been able to be done to conquer this disease, cancer in general.

Billions and billions of dollars are raised, and it is very frustrating that drug companies want to manufacture the same type drugs over and over (i.e. Avastin). We don't need another Avastin......we need new immunotherapy treatments, or CURE.

It can be done, but there is too much red tape, and greed. It is a human tragedy. Where do we turn???

2 new drugs have recently been approved for CRC. One has very bad side effects. The other, Zaltrap (avastin-like), will not even be used at Sloan-Kettering (too expensive and too much like avastin which is half the cost). There was an article in the NY Times.
Oh, and these were fast-tracked......?????????????????????????????

Hope you can get the word out there, and hope some smart people take a chance, and go for the cure, in whatever way they can. There will be plenty of money in it for them regardless of the "mechanism".
Too bad there is this monopoly against the human race.

Thank you for asking.

Lovekitties's picture
Lovekitties
Posts: 2942
Joined: Jan 2010

Thanks for asking and for being an advocate against all cancers.

I have to admit that I get a bit "pinked out" particularly in October. I understand that millions of folks have done a tremendous job at promoting breast cancer awareness. I get particularly pieved about products which promote intestinal health being all pink in October but don't have a hint of blue in March for colorectal cancer.

I feel that the bottom line is this...Everyone who has received a cancer diagnosis of any kind and each of their loved ones wish that there was a cure for all. Cancer takes the lives of millions of good men, women and children every year and the statistics only grow. We must have a cure for all cancer soon.

Again, thanks for asking.

Marie who loves kitties

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4672
Joined: May 2005

I see so many ribbons on almost EVERYTHING that to me, it only signifies that someone is basically give some cause a "Harumph". It doesn't signify wholehearted support to me. It falls under the least one can do. I wish that pancreatic cancer got much more funding than it does get. It's just not as "popular" as breast or colon cancers.

I'm probably totally off base with this but one of the first things I think of when I see the pink ribbon is the "Susan G. Komen for the Cure" organization and the thoughts are negative due to their copyright of the phrase and not allowing other cancers to use "for the cure" in their fund drives not to mention their stand on "women's issues"...

In 2007, the organization changed its name to Susan G. Komen for the Cure and trademarked the running ribbon as part of its new branding strategy. Komen has come under fire for legal action against other non-profits or organizations using the phrase "for the cure" within their names. An August 2010 article in the Wall Street Journal detailed a case in which the organization Uniting Against Lung Cancer was told in a letter from Komen that they should no longer use the name "Kites for the Cure" for their annual fundraising event. Komen also wrote to the organization to warn them "against any use of pink in conjunction with 'cure.'" More than 100 small charities have received legal opposition from Komen regarding various uses of the words "for the cure" in their names. Among the offending charitable organizations and events were "Par for the Cure," "Surfing for a Cure," "Cupcakes for a Cure" and "Mush for the Cure".

I just wish more was spent on less common cancers by our Government and that regular people took cancer more seriously. At some point, everyone's affected by cancer.
Aren't you glad you asked?

janderson1964's picture
janderson1964
Posts: 1613
Joined: Oct 2011

I couldnt agree with you more.

Varmint5's picture
Varmint5
Posts: 371
Joined: Feb 2012

My feelings about the pink ribbon campaign is well summarized here: http://www.ihadcancer.com/h3-blog/10-04-2012/Is-It-Time-To-Regulate-The-Pink-Ribbon

Many people I know and love have been affected by breast cancer and I am sympathetic to the issue and have supported them in any way I could while they were battling the disease. A couple are no longer living. Many are. I love them and am thankful they are alive. I miss and grieve those who aren't.

My precious daughter - my only child - was diagnosed at age 32, 6 1/2 weeks after the birth of her first child, with stage IV colon cancer. She is battling it now. She is one of five people in her age group (30s, one was 42) recently diagnosed with colon cancer in our small rural community. I live in a town of approx. 4500 people. By recently I mean over this past 12 months. Something is wrong.

Discussion of colon cancer doesn't generate the "warm fuzzy" feeling that discussions of breast cancer sometimes does - and right now I am speaking from a perspective of what shows up on my facebook page. We have "Boobie Bashes" (fundraisers) and talk about "the girls" (breasts), and pink everywhere. People in chemo for breast cancer are bald and look like they have cancer and this garners sympathy in all of us, myself included.

But what I've learned about colon cancer is that those battling it aren't usually bald. They many times look normal, but are in a life or death struggle. My daughter lost a third of her body weight. People say "You look good!" She has her (thinning) hair and a horrible rash on her face and God forbid - a colostomy. People whisper about it. It's not discussed. One of her friends showed up at my door with a bunch of her cast off loose clothing and a horrified look on her face and whispered, "I hope she can use these to hide her BAG."

I applaud everyone attempting to honor cancer victims or raise awareness. I just don't know what can be done to promote colon cancer awareness. I plan to try to help but right now am so overwhelmed with everything. Just look at the number of members and posts on this board - right up there with breast cancer.

Best wishes to you and your efforts.

Sandy

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

I'm learning a lot already from all your comments, and so appreciate your willingness to share them with me.

Marie, I never thought about the irony of products promoting intestinal health being all decked out in pink in October, but not recognizing anything in March -- what a great point.

And Sandy, I wasn't aware that the chemo you get for colon cancer doesn't typically make you lose your hair? I sure remember all the "But you look good" comments I got after my surgery, before I started chemo -- in clothes, I looked exactly the same as I did before I was diagnosed, and it was almost like people didn't believe that I was sick. I was almost a little bit grateful to start chemo and lose my hair, because FINALLY people were willing to recognize that I had cancer!

And oh yes -- "Cupcakes for a Cure" is surely a covert sinister organization, and must be stopped immediately! :-)

Traci

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4672
Joined: May 2005

Press Button Twice
(It doesn't release gas!)

I will say this, I'm not sure I'd buy chocolate cupcakes that had anything to do with colon cancer!

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

I get the "you look so good" comment a lot, too. My onc even told me once that if he ran into me on the street he'd never guess I was a cancer patient. My reply was "if you ran into me on the street I'd sue you because I always cross with the light." It took him a couple of seconds to get it.

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1224
Joined: Oct 2010

We support all Cancer Awareness! (April is Colon Cancer Awareness Month.) The disease is terrible and probably linked to each other. There are finally exciting trials in targeted chemo treatments.

The only issue I would have with any cancer advocacy group is their link to profits vs research or patient dollars. Use the less then 20% United Way of ranking a good charity to the running of the charity and the rest to the actual charity. Demanding guaranteed funds to take place in a walk is offense. (OK, I get one needs to bring in $X dollars to get the commemorative Sweatshirt. Demanding a credit card to guarantee the funds is offensive.)

So, the difference between Cancer Fund Raising and particularly Breast Cancer is a noticeable difference in style. Breast Cancer needs to class it up a bit before the rest of cancer groups will fully support.

Sincerely, mike

geotina's picture
geotina
Posts: 2059
Joined: Oct 2009

I'll respond. I am so very sick of pink, pink, pink. Even the pizza places are using pink boxes. Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in north America. I joined this community 3 years ago and to be honest, most of the people that were here 3 years ago are now dead. Many, many, many of them were well under the age of 50 yet they continue to promote no testing until age 50. The recurrence rate is horrible. The funding is horrible.

I went shopping the other day and was offered a 20% off coupon for a donation. No thank you. Turn on the TV and football players have pink on, TV announcers have pink on, every other commericial is pink, pink, pink. Enough already.

Colon cancer is treated like the dirty little cancer. Many notables have or had colon cancer yet so very few come out publically to promote awareness, fund raising. etc.

Of course breast cancer is also horrible but all cancer is horrible. Sometimes I wonder just what do they do with all the money they raise. You hear so much about fundraising. If a woman needs a mamogram for little or no cost it is available but try finding a little or no cost colonoscopy, its not out there so people don't get tested and by the time the cancer is found it is often too late for long term remission.

Best wishes to you and and congratulations on being a survivor of breast cancer.

Tina

Sorry for the rant but you asked.

maglets's picture
maglets
Posts: 2406
Joined: Jun 2006

I have been holding my breath all day since I read your post....

do not wish to be rude in any way but perhaps you are getting a feeling for how we are feeling...

pink!!! enough already....little pink everything...we labor with the so unattractive connection with bowels and poop and brown....

sorry for the rant....

mags

Patteee's picture
Patteee
Posts: 949
Joined: Jul 2009

I am with Tina and Mags
Both my mother and sister are breast cancer survivors as well as 2 co-workers
my grandmother and great grandmother died of breast cancer

I get the feeling they had the right one and those of us with other cancers have the wrong one.
my mother cringed when she heard that I had a colostomy and kept telling herself it could be reversed
Mags is right, it is an an un attractive cancer- the push for pink seems to glamorize it, be proud you had it?
That to me is strange.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3402
Joined: Apr 2010

Well, here's my honest feelings, I feel resentful when I go into the grocery store, I try not to go into it too often in October, our Safeway is full of Pink, Pink, Pink, Pink everywhere. T-shirts, grocery bags, crepe paper, ribbons, wrist bands, the list goes on... one is assailed with Pink in October. Pink on almost all the groceries being sold. Even the probiotic yogurt does the pink ribbon thing, and hello, their probiotic stance is for colon cancer, but they rather be sexy pink then colon blue. I want to say "What about the rest of us?????" I resent that no one cares that much about us on the colon/rectal end, we're not sexy. No one wants to discuss the second leading cancer killer. Read the newspapers, if they died of breast cancer, it states it, rarely does it state that the person died of colon/rectal cancer, no one wants to put that out there, my obit will read died of colon cancer when that time comes, I want it out there, I want people to know we die from this, a lot of people die from it. Our grocery store also does blue in March for colon cancer, if you look really hard you can spot a blue crepe paper on the end of each cash register, but that's about it.
We don't get sympathy, I'm pretty sure my neighbors really doubt I have Stage IV colon cancer, because I LOOK TOO GOOD.
I feel sorry for all cancer victims, my sister-in-law is fighting breast cancer right now, and she has my utmost sympathy, my favorite ever sister-in-law also fought breast cancer and I don't wish that on anyone,but my fav sister-in-law's daughter is DEAD from colon cancer. Do the people that have colon cancer get lost in the cancer fight and the research money? Yes, they do, and it's a sad thing that so many of us fall to the wayside dying in our private world and the last words people are saying are, "but she looked so good".

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

...I really, truly appreciate all your comments and your honesty.

I swear, if I didn't want to hear what you REALLY think, I wouldn't have asked! And I don't feel that anyone is being rude at all -- I'm learning a lot about how Pinktober looks and feels to all of you.

Mike, if we hadn't already announced the title of our service (We're calling it "Surviving October"), I would TOTALLY have stolen your line and called it: "Breast Cancer Needs to Class It Up"! Completely agree with you!

And I think you're all right that breasts are sexy and glamorous, but folks don't want to think about other people's rear parts. I have to say -- EVERY SINGLE PERSON I've ever told that I have/had breast cancer immediately looks at my breasts -- bet they wouldn't be looking at my a** if I had colon cancer!

And herdiziness, I also shop at Safeway, and the wall-to-wall pink is truly overwhelming....the last straw for me were the breast cancer awareness eggs, where there's a pink ribbon stamped on every single egg...really? And the point of that is what, exactly?

Keep 'em coming -- I'm really learning a lot.

Traci

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4672
Joined: May 2005

How do they get the chickens to stamp their eggs on the way out?

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

Before I got my dx I had a t-shirt with a pink ribbon. About a year or so after I found out I had coloretal cancer I had gown so sick of pink that I tossed the shirt in the trash. The breaking straw for me was when I tried to get house cleaning from Cleaning for the Cause and it was only available for female breast cancer patients. The highest death rate by gender is men with breast cancer because they don't know to check for it. I've just grown so tired of the gender bias that I'm trying to find a sshop that makes t-shirts so I can have one made with a blue ribbon that says "Breasts aren't the only thing that get cancer."

While I'm ranting ... It never ceases to amaze the number of people who think that a brown ribbon is for colon cancer. That's not only tacky, it relegates us (as someone above has already mentioned) to the dirt little secret of ass cancer.

My opinion is that October should just be Cancer Awareness Month with a multi-color ribbon which represents all forms of cancer. If any one particular cancer needs to be emphasized I would suggest childhood cancer. I don't want a cure for me, I want one for them.

Ruffy7
Posts: 126
Joined: Sep 2011

Interesting topic. I have a bit of a different view as my cancer (appendix) is very rare. I've tried getting on appendix cancer support sites but there is very little activity - so I get more involved in other cancer sites but still feel that I don't belong there either. There is little/no funding/research on this because it just doesn't benefit that many people. Even most oncs want to treat it like colon cancer. I certainly don't wish that more people had it but, while cancer is isolating in and of itself, having one that is rare even isolates you more. (I had never even heard of appendix cancer prior to getting my dx!).

I can definitely relate to how many here are responding to your question, I, especially when I was newly dx, felt some resentment that there was so much recognition and enthusiasm to beat one cancer and totally ignore others. My heart goes out to anyone battling any kind of cancer but it doesn't feel good to think no one really knows about your cancer or care to work on finding a cure for it. (Pity party :), I know there are a few good docs in the country who do know/care about it - hope you know what I mean? Well better stop rambling... :)

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

People really just assume that brown is the ribbon color for colon cancer because it's the color of poop? That's really, truly, completely appalling.

Doc_Hawk, are you by chance referring to Cleaning for a Reason? Many women on the breast cancer board have been frustrated by trying to use them -- while it's reprehensible that they could be so narrow-minded as not to include male breast cancer patients, if it makes you feel any better, most of us can't get them to help us, either! :-)

Now I'm glad that we've already settled on a title for our service, because I wouldn't have been able to decide between "Breast Cancer Needs to Class It Up" and "Breasts Aren't the Only Things That Get Cancer." Doc_Hawk, if it's all right with you, I would definitely like to mention your t-shirt idea during my talk.

Traci

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

I'd love to have you use the t-shirt idea. And yes, it was Cleaning for a Reason. When I was living in Flagstaff AZ during the first year of my fight, the local Merry Maids offered cleaning services without any restrictions. My frustration is that I'm 53 and care giver for my parents, both in late their 70's and have disabilities and we just can't keep up with housework.

JayhawkDan's picture
JayhawkDan
Posts: 206
Joined: Apr 2012

I was dx about 9 months ago, and before that I suppose I thought all the pink stuff was nice to bring awareness to this dread disease. Well, fast forward to watching the KC Chiefs game last Sunday and I blurted out "I'm so sick of all this pink stuff!" It really does seem that we're forgotten and it also seems that cancer awareness -- for all cancer types -- should be more inclusive. It's like pink fascism. At the same time I asked the family if they knew that colon cancer is represented with the blue ribbon. My son-in-law, trying to be funny, actually said he thought it was brown. Haha. Anyway, that's my $.02. Hugs to all cancer-battlers. Dan

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1531
Joined: Mar 2010

This is a topic I’ve thought a lot about. Frankly, I’ve seen way too much pink. Everyone assumes that because I’m a woman and a cancer survivor, of course I had breast cancer. And also because the chemo with breast cancer is associated with losing your hair, the fact that my chemo didn’t cause my hair to fall out means that my chemo wasn’t as “difficult” to tolerate. (Frankly, hair falling out would have been vastly preferable to the side effects I did endure.)

A lot more needs to be done to encourage awareness of all cancers, and to raise research dollars for all cancers. Breast Cancer is successful because there are so many survivors able to fight for the cause. In other cancers, we don’t have the survivor base to drum up dollars for the cause.

Cancer is cancer and it is horrible, however you look at it. I’m not going to compare our various journeys through cancer – some of us have had it worse than others; none of us has had it easy.

But I do hate the emphasis on pink, and almost feel like people are being condescending, offering me what-have-you (a shoe horn, in once situation) while proudly noting “see, we have the pink ribbon on it!” Alternately, people seem uncomfortable when I tell them that my cancer wasn’t breast cancer – I no longer fit their “mold”.

That being said, over the past few weeks, I’ve turned to the “Pink Sisters” for support as I’ve gone through my major breast cancer scare, complete with every procedure up to and including lumpectomy. You were all there for me and I appreciate it. But you would have been there for me without the pink ribbons, just as we, in colorectal cancer (blue ribbons) would be there for you if you need to visit our site with questions. We cancer survivors know something that no one who hasn’t been through this can know, and for the most part, we share our knowledge and support each other.

And a side note, like Ruffy7, I’m not colon cancer either. She and I sport the little-known amber ribbons of Appendix Cancer. However, there aren’t enough of us to support our own group. And research dollars for Appendix Cancer? Virtually non-existent. (By the way, Audrey Hepburn died of appendix cancer.)

Let’s get off the pink band wagon, and find something that represents CANCER, and work together for research on all cancers, not just those who scream the loudest.

PS - I want one of the T-shirts!

RobinKaye
Posts: 93
Joined: Nov 2011

it's condescending. Breast cancer gets so much attention by politicians, marketers etc., because they are going after a constituency. What other cancer can you lump one voting category in like breast cancer. They get the funding because it's politically expedient - get the female vote, marketers wanting to sell to the biggest consumer block use pink ribbons on their product to scream "look at us we care about women". Breast cancer awareness advocates have done an excellent job of messaging, they are raising a lot of money for research, some of which might trickle down to other cancers but they have been able to do this because of, for lack of a better word, pandering to women. If you don't support breast cancer awareness you are anti-woman. It's condescending.

I care about breast cancer just like I care about lymphoma, leukemia, colorectal cancer and so on. Is breast cancer bad, has it affected people I know...yes. It's horrible but no more so than any other cancer. Actually being a caregiver to a rectal cancer patient and seeing how it has created a prisoner to the toilet with all the ensuing pain I know if I had to choose I'd take breast cancer insofar as the effect it would have on my quality of life.

bailee2012
Posts: 61
Joined: Jul 2012

Reading all of your posts has made me feel that I am not alone in the whole "sick of pink ribbons" thing. Just last week I was berating myself for feeling that I am sick of all this pink ribbons stuff everywhere and what about everyone else who has cancer just not breast cancer. Honestly I had never given it any thought until my husband was diagnosed stage IV in may at 48 years old. I bought tissues last week and didn't realize til I got home that the box is decorated with pink ribbons just like everything else is this month. I was actually aggravated about that. I was tellin myself that I should not feel that way because breast cancer survivors are in the same battle with this monster as we are. Maybe at your church meeting you could pass out ribbons in all the colors of the other cancers and explain what each color represents. This is a great opportunity for you to make those people "aware" of the other cancers that people are battling every day.
By the way, everyone on this board has been an inspiration to me because I didn't think it was possible to survive stage IV when husband was diagnosed but have realized through all of you that it IS possible. Thank you so much for that!!!

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

bailee2012, my first thought about a ritual to include in our church service was also to make available ribbons in colors of different cancers, and allow folks to tie them on a tree in honor or memory of a loved one (or themselves).

But after I downloaded a long list of awareness ribbons from Wikipedia, I realized that unfortunately wasn't going to work. Because there are only so many colors, many causes share colors (yellow, for example, is the color for bone cancer, but is of course also associated with support for the military), or use multicolor striped ribbons (the ribbon for head and neck cancer is burgundy and ivory striped) that I knew I wouldn't have the money or resources to find for our service.

And I also knew that, even if I did my very best to include every possible color, there would be someone who felt I had excluded his/her loved one.

So...what we're doing for the service is setting up our big artificial Christmas tree prominently at the front of the church, decorated with lavender silk flowers -- during the service, we'll invite folks to tie lavender ribbons (representing all cancers, according to the ACS) on the tree in honor or memory of anyone. We'll leave the tree there with all the ribbons until it's time to decorate it for Christmas.

We hope that will be meaningful for our congregation, and make an ongoing statement every Sunday until Christmas about inclusion of everyone whose life is turned upside down by cancer.

Traci

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1224
Joined: Oct 2010

When I lived in Cali (Simi Valley), our Relay for Life chapter had a lot of Seven Day Adventists. They also did a Ribbon Tree for all Relay for Life fund raisers. One could donate to put a ribbon up, or just put a ribbon up. Messages and prayers were said. They were powerful joyful events.

The Christmas Tree with the ribbons sounds really neat! If we were still in Cali, we would come and see you.

Best Always, mike

Jaylo969
Posts: 826
Joined: Jan 2010

I am delighted that someone "Gets it." Thank you Traci!

I live on a very busy avenue and 300 pink-adorned motorcycles just roared down the street. Pink on everything...helmets, clothes and pepto colored cycles stopping traffic for over 15 minutes.I stood on my sidewalk and watched and commented on how I wish that people would participate in things like that by sponsoring ALL cancers.We CC folks do good to get a handfull to participate in or even acknowledge things pertaining to the hind quarters of the body.It just ain't sexy.

I attend an American Cancer Society support group in my area. It is for general cancer, not just breast cancer. I am thinking seriously about stopping my attendance because most of the meetings seem to be focused on breast cancer.Our group took a meal over to Hope Lodge in August and a nice lady came up to me and asked " Did you have both breasts removed?" I wanted to say "No, but I did have half of my A $ $ taken out. Wanna' see?"
When I was on chemo I had someone tell me, "Hey, I like your wig". ...I didn't lose my hair, just a lot of other things.

Thank you Traci...I have been wanting to say this for a long time. I feel better now. Oh yeah, I buy NO pink stuff. I don't like the way it has become so commercialized.

-Pat...3 yr. Colon Cancer Survivor and proud of it.

maglets's picture
maglets
Posts: 2406
Joined: Jun 2006

sorry traci////don't mean to intrude....

Pat it is cold and rainy here....just sat down with a nice glass of red wine....

when i read your A$$ and wig comments I started to laugh so hard.....tears rolling down my cheeks. Pat that is THE BEST....thanks for the nice big belly laugh

have a hug.....

mags

oh and I wanted to mention .....went to our Farmers' Market here this morning and there was a couple collecting money for the local Canadian Cancer Society. They were collecting money in a genuine toilet.....that they had painted bright bepto-bismal PINK....whaaaaaaa??????

is nothing scared.....I thought we semi-colons at least might have some claims on the toilet as a symbol but apparently not.....haha

mags

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1531
Joined: Mar 2010

No, I still have both my breasts, but I'm only half-@$$ed.

Pat, your comments are GREAT!

Alice a/k/a Semi-Colon Alice

Jaylo969
Posts: 826
Joined: Jan 2010

My pleasure to make you smile:))

-Pat

maglets's picture
maglets
Posts: 2406
Joined: Jun 2006

I wrote scared but of course I meant sacred.....wow this vino must potent stuff
and Alice I believe you have two and one half breasts...:)

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1531
Joined: Mar 2010

I think you're right, Mags!

(Oh, and I have numerous punctuation issues: not only am I a semi-colon, no more full-colon; but after all the surgical removals, I no longer have a period! The only definitive in my life is a question mark.)

I should add that I think the idea of the lavender universal cancer ribbons is the right way to go. People can write the person's name and/or cancer on the ribbon if they'd like.

Another note - I have a pink ribbon blanket a friend made for me, and she doesn't know (or understand why) I can't use it. Anyone want a pink-ribbon fleece blanket? It is nice, but just not for me!

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

Hi, Alice -

If you're serious about wanting to offload that blanket, you might post on the breast cancer board, and ask anyone interested to PM you? I'm sure there are ladies going through chemo now in this colder weather who might appreciate a handmade pink-ribbon blanket.

After all, you and your poor bruised and battered breasts have been through enough to surely make you an honorary "sister" on our board, and at least then your friend's misguided gesture would bring a little comfort to someone else.

Traci

jen2012
Posts: 1206
Joined: Aug 2012

Traci - I think your idea is a lovely one and I can tell you have really gone out of your way to be inclusive and thoughtful to all.

I asked my teenager what she thought - lots of pink out games and pink in the HS this month. She said it's a good thing and she figured if they find a cure for breast cancer, they'll be that much closer to curing other types.

I'm not sure how I feel about the pink or really about a lot of the cancer stuff - relay for life, etc. I kind of feel like there is really just too much money thrown at cancer - why would they come up with a cure when they have so much money coming in each year? Maybe if all the money that was raised went directly to people who were suffering with cancer it would be better, or more education about avoiding cancer, etc. It just seems to me that there has been so much money given for research, it makes me skeptical...

Plus think about all of the other horrible diseases out there and how those people must feel about any type of cancer fundraising - as far as I know there still is not cure for ALS and other diseases.

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

kill me ,I got a big flu! Hahah, aghhh,aghhhh!.

TraciInLA's picture
TraciInLA
Posts: 1842
Joined: Jul 2009

Oh, Pat...That's one of those comments to which my grandpa would have said, "You might as well laugh as to cry."

And PLEASE promise me that, if anyone ever asks you again about your "mastectomy," that you WILL use that line....it's perfect!

A pink TOILET, Mags? What vino were THEY drinking? I feel as though I should apologize on behalf of all breast cancer survivors for stealing your "sacred symbol"! :-) :-) :-)

Traci

tootsie1's picture
tootsie1
Posts: 5006
Joined: Feb 2008

Hey, Traci.

I do have to admit that I have to grit my teeth a lot in October. I do love all my friends who have struggled with breast cancer, but I sure wish people knew that women do get other types of cancer.

Thank you for asking!

*hugs*
Gail

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