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iliostomy reversal surgery

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Just wondering if anyone has had this surgery and willing to share some information.

Semira's picture
Semira
Posts: 284
Joined: Mar 2012

my husband had his ileo reversed. All went far much better than we expected. He left hospital after about a week and since then everything has improved step by step. Still frequency and consistence of 'the output' have not returned to normal but are managable.

Presently we are traveling 3 weeks through france and with one Immodium (Loperamid) each morning he is able to have normal active vacation (we are not the lazy beach kind).

He eats everything he likes and with some stuff which in german is called 'Flohsamenschalen' (indian fleaseeds) the BM makes no problems the most time.

Hugs from Germany
Petra - still in France till saturday and typing on the phone so sorry for typos

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Thank you for the encouraging news. How wonderful to hear you are enjoying life so soon after this surgery. I have read stories of this taking far longer to recoup and wondered if the quality of life is better before or after surgery, or if it is even worth reversing.

Enjoy your remaining days in France!!

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

After my colorectal surgery back in 2006, and a bungled operation
that finally (after three operations) ended with me having over
four of five feet of colon removed and an Ileostomy placed....
I had pleaded for a reversal. My pleas were staved off, saying that
I needed to do chemo first, since the chemo results in severe diarrhea
and having an ostomy would be of great help to my quality of life
during treatments.

I never did chemo. But after learning about what a reversal would
do; how the very watery output will remain watery due to the lack
of sufficient amount to colon to absorb/re-uptake the liquid to my
system, I gave getting a reversal more serious thought.

In 2010 I required surgery to remove an intestinal obstruction due
to the adhesions from the 2006 surgery(s). Had I had a reversal back
in 2006, the adhesions would have even more intense, since each
surgery causes more adhesions.

My original Ileostomy is/was a "end type", where it would have
required the same amount of surgery as it took to provide the
Ileostomy to begin with, to re-connect the intestines. One end
is sticking out of my body, while the other end (to be connected to),
is buried someplace within my body.

A "loop type" ostomy is where a section of intestine is pulled
out of the body, cut in half, and stitched to the abdomen to
provide output into an appliance (pouching system). Both lumens
(entrances to each section of intestine; holes) are easily seen
projecting through. A reversal is made much easier in that
case, since both ends are available right there, at that site.

So, getting a reversal, and the outcome of it, makes a difference
depending on:

A. How much colon and small intestine is left
B. If it's a "loop" or "end type" Ileostomy.

The placement of the present Ileostomy is also an important
consideration. If the present location is below the belt line,
and does not interfere with the wearing of one's normal clothes;
if it's located at an area where it is not bothersome... and if the
stoma was formed properly (3/4 to 1 inch projection from the
body), then you may want to re-think a reversal. The present
location can not be re-used for later surgery of a new ostomy,
and that can complicate a "re-reversal", if that should be necessary.

You would want to make certain that there's enough colon left in
to afford proper absorption of liquid, otherwise the output may
be too liquid (like continual diarrhea) to offer much of a life without
being near a toilet.

It should be noted, that when they resect the section of colon that
adjoins the small intestine, the "ileocecal valve" is removed (it's part
of the colon). Without that valve, the frequency of output is not
controlled as well by the body.

So, there are many things to consider if the choice is going to be made,
and it shouldn't be an easy or quick choice.

You can learn more about ostomies here: UOAA Discussion Board

There are worse things than having an ostomy!

Best wishes for you and yours,

John

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Thank you John for your thoughts. I have an "end type". I am actually quite happy with my ostomy for the most part. It does sit at the waist, but low rise jeans work well! I was told the same thing with the chemo, but have finished my treatments and now need another surgery to remove a new tumor. (unsure if this is cancerous, what type or if chemo is needed again)

Was wondering if it was a good option to do the reversal while already opened again. I am weary of scar tissue strangulating my small intestine in the future and also, having no colon left at all, if this surgery is even a good choice for quality of life. So confused and surgery is approaching quickly.

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

Re:
"now need another surgery to remove a new tumor"

You should really consult with an experienced colorectal surgeon,
and not one of the same group or organization as your present
physicians. A second opinion is -always- worth the time.

Rather than more chemo, surgery would do the job for you,
and probably with less side effects.

There's Laparoscopic surgery, where they use micro-tools through
a small opening, rather than slice you end-to-end for full open surgery.
A good colorectal surgeon can tell you the advantages, and if it's
a possible choice for you.

There's RFA (radio frequency ablation) that might be useful in
your case. It's less invasive than open surgery, and can greatly
reduce the size of a tumor.

There's been great advances in surgical techniques, and all very
useful for cancer removal.

Nothing is guaranteed to rid the cancer completely, but some things
are less invasive and carry less side effects than other methods.

I would choose surgical methods over chemical treatments any
day, for any reason, but it's a personal choice (as it should be).

(You can click on my name and read my history and blog.....
for whatever's it's worth)

As far as your ostomy?

I'd ask if the ileocecal valve is still there (it usually isn't if it's an
"end" ileo), and exactly how much of the colon remains.

If the valve is gone, or there's less than three feet of the five feet
we usually have.... or a combination of both... and if you're
adjusted well to having an ostomy and find it fairly easy to manage,
I would leave it be, because trying to go back might be more
of a problem than you want. I would rather have an ileostomy
than have to wear "Depends" for the rest of my life.

And you'll have to decide if you really want the surgeon to be
digging around in there, looking for that loose end of colon
that's managed to work it's way down in there someplace,
and stretch that shortened piece to reconnect it....
(gosh, that was a scary documentary)

It's a life changing event, but being diagnosed with cancer is a
life changing event.

You'll do OK, just get other opinions from other colorectal surgeons
while you have the time to. Ask nurses who they would recommend,
they usually see things we peasants aren't privy to.

And smile!

Best wishes,

John

joemetz's picture
joemetz
Posts: 493
Joined: Nov 2011

Greetings

In Dec 2011 I got the bag... and July 26, 2012 I had it reversed.

I had radiation therapy 24 years ago to remove NonHodgkins Lymphoma... and my transvers colon was radiated badly. they think that's what caused my original tumor in my colon, that spread 4cm to my liver. (the cancer never hit the lymph nodes or any other organ).

anyway... for the reveral they cut out 8 inches of the transverse colon (non-evasive surgery). He cut the colostomy hole bigger (big enough to get his hand in there. Then they cut incisions on the north side of my belly button and one in the side of me... that's where he put the "tools" into my stomach to complete the surgery.

the reconnection and colon resection took about 4 or 5 hours.
I recovered pretty well.

Oh yeah... the doctor did an epidural (like the block that women get for pain when having a baby. It was a fantastic idea and the doctors who visited me told me that it was ingenious. Pain was minimal for the first four days.

I was up and walking on the 2nd day after surgery and within 4 days i was passing gas and headed home on day 7. I stayed home from work for another two weeks... but by week three i was able to move around and everything was "working". Not completely "normal"... whatever that is... but NO MORE BAG!

its been 7 weeks since surgery and i restarted a new chemo treatment plan for maintenance chemo to keep the remaining cancer in the liver and not allow it to move around or spread or grow.

now i'm on Xeloda and Avastin, which i started yesterday.
i feel better than i have felt in nearly 3 years (before i knew i had cancer).

I was super nervous as i had heard many bad stories about this reversal surgery.
what i discovered is that the people with the biggest problems usually have the biggest story to share. they are pissed off so they want to make sure they take out their anger by sharing their bad news with others. I get that.

but those of us, like me, who had a very successful reconnection don't speak up and post details unless we are asked to do so.

so that's why i share with you.
it's awesome to be able to eat, drink and enjoy any and all foods and liquids.

my best to you

joe

RobinKaye
Posts: 93
Joined: Nov 2011

I think this is my first question here - my husband had reversal surgery last Tuesday. He has a straight connect (low rectal tumor, 95% of rectum removed). So far not so good: no control and has to sit on the toilet sometimes for an hour. Trying to stick to a low residue diet, not that it matters as he's hardly eating. I'm giving him Metamucil, Immodium and marshmallows...don't laugh, saw that it helps on another board, anything to try and firm him up. He's still having bad cramping so much that it doubles him over. We got home from the hospital on Saturday and he has slept most of the time since, unless he's in the bathroom.

I know there is an adjustment and it takes time. In the meantime am I doing anything wrong? Any other suggestions.

Thanks,
Robin

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi Robin,

I wish I could be of more help to you... I will tell you that from the research I have done over the last year and read over and over it really does depend on how much of each organ is remaining. Did your husband have a lot of his colon left? Did they image and measure the remaining rectum and check for muscle control? Did he have a temp. colostomy or was this one operation to remove a tumor and then reconnect right away? Is chemo involved?

I have heard the marshmellow thing as well. Banana is always a great bulker. Mashed potatoes work really well...the instant kind.

I wish you well and your husband. Hope for some relief for him.

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi Robin,

I wish I could be of more help to you... I will tell you that from the research I have done over the last year and read over and over it really does depend on how much of each organ is remaining. Did your husband have a lot of his colon left? Did they image and measure the remaining rectum and check for muscle control? Did he have a temp. colostomy or was this one operation to remove a tumor and then reconnect right away? Is chemo involved?

I have heard the marshmellow thing as well. Banana is always a great bulker. Mashed potatoes work really well...the instant kind.

I wish you well and your husband. Hope for some relief for him.

RobinKaye
Posts: 93
Joined: Nov 2011

He has all of his colon, no rectum. Surgery was in January and he has the ileostomy until last week. Prior to surgery he had six weeks of chemo/radiation and two rounds of FOLFOX and did six more rounds after surgery. I know the surgeon examined him prior to the surgery and he had a barium enema to check for leakage but that's it.

I know it's way too early to tell but I sure hope this gets better - right now it's kind of scary.

Robin

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi Robin,

From what I have read over the year he may just be ok. He has his colon which is the organ that absorbs all the fluid. I think for him it is just going to be a matter of getting that remaining muscle to work and control it. Time will hopefully take care of him. :) Well wishes for him and strength to you as you help him heal.

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

Re:
"what i discovered is that the people with the biggest problems
usually have the biggest story to share. they are pissed off so
they want to make sure they take out their anger by sharing their
bad news with others. I get that."

Not really Joe; In fact, not at all.

The outcome of a "reversal" is very dependent on many factors,
some of which I explained above. If one is lucky enough to
have had a very minimal amount of resection, and most of their
intestine remains (and their rectum remains intact and of full use),
then things will likely go fairly smooth for them.

If there has been a large loss of colon, or the rectum, or if there's
been a major loss of small intestine, there will likely be problems.

Many surgeons play down the "bad parts", thinking that one's
quality of life will be improved if they do not have an ostomy
to adjust to, failing to explain the ramifications of an operation
that may keep the patient in "Depends" or moored to the toilet
forever.

The UOAA site is best for learning about the ramifications, and
to read about the "good outcomes", but again.... it all depends on
what was resected and what remains.

Some of us were luckier than others, but not knowing the difference
between each of our operations only results in false hopes for
a great outcome for those not so lucky.

Education need not be a black cloud hanging over one's head,
it could be the ray of sunshine that elevates us.

Best of health,

John

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

I think education is the key as well, although there are some clouds...I did turn to your suggestion of the site you posted. Still trying to get some answers. Again, it matters on what remains. I am having difficulty finding someone to talk to with my situation I suppose. Everyone seems to have more colon remaining or less rectum or both. I have all of my rectum, a small amount of sigmoid. 14 inches between the two. No colon. The plan is to connect the small intestine to the 14 inch stump. I am not one who is willing to do depends or stay home. I am young and not really bothered by my ostomy. I am proud to have it as it has saved my life. Although, it would be nice to put Humpty back together again ... if ... well you know the rest.

joemetz's picture
joemetz
Posts: 493
Joined: Nov 2011

John

thanks for your note.

back when i was doing my research, prior to my reversal, i think i found ONE good post or person speaking out online to every 10 to 15 terrible stories. Scared the crap out of me.

but, I guess i should have said it differently.

but, thanks for educated and knowledge sharing... I get what you said there.... just wish i would have found your info prior to my reversal and maybe i would have been more calm.

thanks again.

my best

Joe

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

It is misinformed information like the following that makes reading blogs scary and sad.

"If there has been a large loss of colon, or the rectum, or if there's
been a major loss of small intestine, there will likely be problems."

I wonder how many people that you have met that had their complete rectum removed and not had any problems. I for one have met many in person. Having your whole rectum removed does not necessary likely mean there will be problems. Because this is not a accurate fact. If you have a skilled surgeon a reversal after a complete removal of the rectum can be very successful. Fortunately the colon can adapt well as the rectum. I know this because I have done a lot of research on this and met many people in person. They are doing well. Unfortunately a lot of what you read online is not accurate information.

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

Re:
"I wonder how many people that you have met that had
their complete rectum removed and not had any problems."

With or without a colostomy?

For educational purposes:

"Loss of Storage Capacity
Normally, the rectum stretches to hold stool until you can get to
a bathroom. But rectal surgery, radiation treatment, and
inflammatory bowel disease can cause scarring that makes the
walls of the rectum stiff and less elastic. The rectum then can't
stretch as much to hold stool and fecal incontinence results.
Inflammatory bowel disease also can irritate rectal walls, making
them unable to contain stool."

http://colorectal.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions--procedures/fecal-incontinence.aspx

"The rectum may also be responsible for incontinence. The rectum,
located above the sphincter muscles, stores stool until it is
time to defecate (move your bowels). Scarring from diseases such
as Ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease or surgical removal of
the rectum causes the rectum to lose the ability to hold stool.
Stool has no where to be stored and leaks out."

http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/aha/umbowel_incontinence.htm

"Common causes of fecal incontinence include constipation,
diarrhea, and muscle or nerve damage. Fecal incontinence may be
due to a weakened anal sphincter associated with aging or to
damage to the nerves and muscles of the rectum and anus from
giving birth"

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fecal-incontinence/DS00477

Listen, I could list a thousand of very qualified sites that will all
explain the same thing: Without a rectum, you will very likely
suffer fecal incontinence. It's not an "opinion", it's biological fact.

What we lose after cancer victimizes us, it very difficult to replace,
but attempting to face facts, can cause us to make decisions that
may take even more from us.

Hopes for your better health,

John

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

I had my reversal surgery 10/03.  I have no rectum. With a great surgeon I am back to normal BM. The only difference is now I have to take a teaspoon of psyllium once a day.  I have come across several people without rectums that have also had successful reversals. I have a straight connect that works well. I am so glad I had faith on my surgeon. 

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Thank you so much for your share. It sounds like you are doing very well, Joe!! And that is wonderful to hear! I agree with you on the angry birds...I have been reluctant to post because of this. It does sound as if you had some colon to work with. I suppose this is where my real issue is. I have been researching this surgery for one year, since my diagnosis and new life began. I had decided against it because of the invasiveness and possible quality of life change, as I have no colon remaining.

I will be asking the valve question today John...thank you. I believe this is where the answer is for me. I know I only have the rectum stump and a small amount of sigmoid left. 14 inches between the two to be exact....I have already had imaging done. The surgeon says "yeah" to that and it is enough. He also tells me it will be consistancy of soft serve ice cream with frequency of 4-5 times per day, that is with taking a "bulker" daily. He promised he would not leave me chained to the toilet. But .. I just don't know.

My colorectal surgeon will begin the surgery (excellent surgeon...top notch), followed by gyn (also best in hospital and region so I hear), finishing with colorectal. I am concerned with recovery on this huge ordeal and also future chemos (if needed) "rocking the boat" so to speak with the "soft serve consistancy". I am a realist and know my odds are more than likely this will be the case given my stage and age. I am stage IIIc with colon.

As far as the chemo and surgeons go....I will not know on chemo until after surgery. My new tumor was found on an ovary ... and grew very quickly. It may be benign, ovarian, or colon again. It must come out and a hysterectomy as well. This has got to be done for my health. The reversal is strickly convienence .... while they have me open and empty (lol). I do not think I would consider it otherwise....but this may be just to convienent. I am young...early 40's....and thin, no other health issues except I just finished 5FU in May. So, they tell me I am a perfect candidate for this surgery and should heal just fine. I am really just afraid for the quality of life change. Honestly ... the ileostomy and it's bag is just a minor incovience to me. It saved my life...and I like to enjoy it...actually, it seems to bother other people more than me.

Time is ticking though to make this decision...One thing I am trying not to do is let fear stand in my way.

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

Hippiechicks,

I will let you know how mine turns out in a couple of weeks! I am having reversal surgery done on October 3rd. I got my ileostomy last November and could have had it reversed in 6 weeks but my oncologist preferred I wait until I finished treatment. I finished treatment June 5 but my supervisors requested I wait unitl October when my work is a little slower. I agreed because they were very awesome and supportive when I had to take time off for surgery and hospital stays.

I will say I have used an experienced colorectal surgeon for all of my surgeries and will use him again for my reversal. I have talked to several of his patients that have had reversals done through him and they are all doing well. They all went back to work in two to three weeks. I met most of them at the cancer center when I was getting my chemo and we kept contact info to share experiences after reversal. By the way, my surgeon is not connected with the cancer center. So I am pretty confident things will go well. I actually ran into one patient at lunch one day and was amazed at what she was eating so soon after reversal. And she was going back to work after lunch. She said she can eat anything! For me I have an ileostomy loop and most of my rectum removed.

My surgeon is very confident that I will do well after surgery. He has told me I should be in the hospital 5 days and back to work in 2 weeks. He never sugar coats anything so I know he is being honest. If you heard him discuss my first surgery with me you would understand the sugar coat thing. He is always brutally honest! Of course, I do understand things can go wrong, especially after my first surgery. Peole that I have met in person are far more positive about their reversals then many of the ones I have read about on line. I think many people who have had issues search on line for support and asnwers where as those that don't have problems don't come on line.

Good luck in your decision! Whatever decision you make will be the best one for you! By the way, if I wasn't able to get a reversal that would be fine too. I have done really well with my "Oscar"! Okay, I have had it so long it really needed a name!

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Thank you for your share. I am scheduled for the following week. Good luck to you and your speedy recovery! My surgeon has told me 4-12 day hospital stay, depending on intestine waking...then 4 week recovery. But, I have read online people are in agony up to two years out!

I think you are also correct about the onliners as is Joe, and was hoping for more accuracy here. It is nice to hear you didn't mind your "Oscar"....mine is Raspberry...lol. I was starting to think I was a little strange...Although, I will say I had worked in the medical field for some time and cared for people with them, so it was not a shock to me.

Positive news is good to hear.

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

Love that you named yours Rasberry! Way too funny because until you said that I never thought about it but the little guy really does look like a rasberry! I needed a laugh today!

I think your stay may be longer because yours I believe you said is not the loop. Mine is a loop. I think attitude and your diet at first has a lot to do with it in some cases. I work for physicians at a Med School and I know they will be understanding if I need a lot of bathroom breaks so that helps with going back to work.

I like you considered not having the reversal as well because I have gotten along well with Oscar but my surgeon convinced me that I will do well. He said he was 98% sure. I am very active too and my ostomy has not stopped me from doing the things I like to do.

Keep us posted on your decision and progress!

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

That sounds like an interesting job! And surely to be understood. I tried work last month with an epic fail. Not ready yet...then I got this new diagnosis, so out again...so so frustrating!

Will do on the keeping an update...will be watching for yours as well...good luck to you!

swimmer22
Posts: 53
Joined: Oct 2011

I had recital cancer surgery with a little rectum left (not sure how much). I had my ilostomy for 10 months. Reversal surgery was on a Tuesday morning and I was sent home Friday evening, so three days in the hospital. Once home, I had to return to the emergency room on Sunday evening as I wasn't feeling well and thought I had a blockage. See I went from diarrhea and frequent stools after surgery to nothing. I didn't have a bowel movement on Saturday and Sunday and by Sunday evening I had myself convinced had a problem.

Well a trip to the emergency room and an x-ray showed no blockage and they sent me home. The next day things started working again. Part of my problem was I stopped all pain medications once I got home and I should have remained on them longer. I just hate the side effects of them but in retrospect I should have taken them and I would have felt much better. I wasn't eating much and the thought of food just made me feel ill.

I had to sleep in a recliner for about a week after surgery as my stomach muscles were too sore to lay down flat then try to stand up. I returned to work full time in two weeks.

I progressed quickly to small formed stools going about 4 times a day, in a consecutive pattern. Meaning I would have a bowel movement, then within the hour be back in the bathroom about 3-4 more times until I was "emptied" out. This pattern continued for about 5 weeks.

I now have movements about twice a day; however, some days I don't go at all. Things have really settled down and I have no worries about having to be near a bathroom. I found that it's best not to think about it and just go with what happens. When I worry or try to plan if I will be able to ride in the car for a 4 hour trip or be stuck in a business meeting, that is when my mind makes me feel like I need to be near a bathroom. Kind of like a nervous stomach scenario.

I wish you all the best. My immediate days following the procedure I regretted haveing the reversal and thought I should have left well enough alone (I adapted well to the ilostomy) but being where I am a short 10 weeks later it was well worth the reversal surgery. I am 48, currently showing no-evidence of disease and hope to enjoy life for many years to come. Best of luck to you!

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

That is very reassuring! I can't believe you were back to work so soon!! Wow!! It is so nice to hear some real stories ... it is making my decision easier. Thank you so much! One question...did you have remaining colon? It sounds like maybe you did. I am also one who does not do pain meds. Left the hospital after last surgery on motrin for the trip home and that was the end of that! :)

RobinKaye
Posts: 93
Joined: Nov 2011

I read the post to my husband - helped reassure him that things were going to get
better.

danker
Posts: 750
Joined: Apr 2012

I had on in 2010. Hospitals, being full of sick people, I got a kidney infection.they fixed that. Then I developed a fistula, Many more weeks with bag. When I met with surgeon to fix fistula-ne need. It was healing itself from the inside out.. Normal life since. Colonoscopy in 2011 was NED. Been NED ever since, living normal life. Assuming you will have a reversal,Good luck.

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Thank you for your share as well...that is another worry I have had was infection leading to more issues. Not knowing if I need to have chemo or what type of cancer I may dealing with, if any, is also making this difficult. But, as of today, I am leaning towards keeping surgery scheduled. I have found some reassuring statistics from a few web sites as well. Everyone has been so helpful!

swimmer22
Posts: 53
Joined: Oct 2011

Hippiechicks (by the way-- like the screen name)

To answer your question, yes my colon was still completely intact. There was no colon removed during the resection. I had a low-lying rectal tumor that was removed. Initially it was a large tumor and the surgeon thought I may need a permanent ostomy; however, I had a complete response to my chemotherapy/radiation treatments prior to surgery. My plum size tumor was reduced to nothing but scar tissue. The resection was to remove the scar tissue area and lymph nodes for pathology. Best of luck to you!

John23
Posts: 1832
Joined: Jan 2007

Thanks for the clarification!

The outcome is dependent upon the situation, and the situation
isn't always the same.

Be well!

John

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

so true...I really am struggling with this one ....

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

Hippiechick, just wondering if you have had your surgery yet? I had mine Wednesday Morning two days ago. The surgery went well and I was off the PCA pump 24 hours later. I didn't start any bowl movements until this morning and now I go about every 4 hours. I assume they will get worse before they get better. My surgeon said to eat a normal diet and if anything caused me diarhea or constipation before not to eat those for the first few weeks. Basically he advised me to listen to my body since all of our bodies are different. Hope your surgery goes well. I should be getting released to night or in the morning. Best of luck to you.

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

Hippiechick, just wondering if you have had your surgery yet? I had mine Wednesday Morning two days ago. The surgery went well and I was off the PCA pump 24 hours later. I didn't start any bowl movements until this morning and now I go about every 4 hours. I assume they will get worse before they get better. My surgeon said to eat a normal diet and if anything caused me diarhea or constipation before not to eat those for the first few weeks. Basically he advised me to listen to my body since all of our bodies are different. Hope your surgery goes well. I should be getting released to night or in the morning. Best of luck to you.

hippiechicks's picture
hippiechicks
Posts: 340
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi there Coppercent!! I am so glad to hear your surgery went well!!! How are you doing now?? I am sad to say mine did not go as smoothly ... but I am thankful that I am alive and well today.  Smile

 

Coppercent
Posts: 143
Joined: Jan 2012

Sorry yours didn't go smoothly. I was very lucky and things went well. We actually just did a long road trip over Christmas.  We went to NYC and for two days we walked all day. My teaspoon of psyllium is my best friend. 

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