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Anxiety - what do you do to stop it?

Ruffy7
Posts: 126
Joined: Sep 2011

Hi All, just curious how many of you have gone with medication to help with anxiety? If not, how do you deal with it? I was always somewhat anxious but since the cancer dx last year and menopause, it is so much worse now. Just comes up suddenly, many times I don't even know why I'm anxious, and it can stay for several days. Any secrets that have worked for you? I tell myself to stop it and get a grip, everything is fine, but that doesn't seem to work. I'm not (and have never so far) taken a prescription to deal with this. Just curious how common this is and how you deal with it.... thanks for listening :)

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

otherwise i would have been certified.

now qigong does the same thing but also gets circulation and oxygenation.

have fun, life is only this beautiful when you know how fragile it is, in this place we know.

hugs,
Pete

LivinginNH's picture
LivinginNH
Posts: 1272
Joined: Apr 2010

Hi, Well, after suffering with extreme anxiety for more than two years, I finally broke down and asked for help. My doctor originally prescribed Zoloft @50mg , but he recently bumped it up to 100mg. I found that it has helped me tremendously - and quickly. I don't cry 5 times a day anymore, and I can actually think more clearly, which has helped me when at work. I don't know why I waited so long to take something, but I'm truly glad that I did.

All my best,
Cyn

fatbob2010's picture
fatbob2010
Posts: 373
Joined: May 2012

I have been told that anxiety is sometimes related to the uncertainty of the unknown. Meditation, prayer, exercise and talking to a trained counselor/therapist can and do help. Of course I am not a doctor but there are medications that are effective, but, some can be habit forming (Zoloft is not one of them). For me, I find relief by trying to stay in the moment and not let my mind wander into the land of "What If." It takes practice to master the techniques of meditation, and mindfulness (staying in the moment). Hugs of relief from your anxiety...Art

lepperl's picture
lepperl
Posts: 39
Joined: Jul 2012

Hi there Ruffy7,
my name is Lori and I am kind of new to this forum. I have some anxiety too. Mostly at night. Sometimes I take a xanax before bed and this helps but I have really tried to ween off of this because I hate extra pills putting undo stress on my liver. I enjoy hot baths. I usually add a box of baking soda to the tub. It is cheap and is soposed to be detoxifying. The jury is still out on that claim but I imagine it detoxifying my body and this helps to de-stress me. Exercise is helpful. I am not sure where you are at in your journey but even if you can only go for short walks this will help. I try to keep busy during the day doing as many things not related to cancer as possible. I know this is hard. Sometimes I feel like no matter what you do there is always this little cancer thought in the back of your mind. I try to erase it whenever I can. I am not sure of your beliefs and I hope this won't offfend you but prayer is a powerful thing and can be very helpful too. Good Luck. I hope you can resolve your anxiety.

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1204
Joined: Oct 2010

We can look at life's journey has despair or a new journey. I chose to let the pity party behind me and look for the journey.

We all have different destinies! Mine or your may be more difficult then others. At the same time each of our lives is our own. What you do with it and how many you effect is also your choice. Choose the positive and the outcome will be more positive for you.

Best Always, mike

taraHK
Posts: 1961
Joined: Aug 2003

I take a small dose of Xanax every evening. I don't have anxiety issues during the day, but get what my dr calls "busy mind" as I am trying to go to sleep. If one can address anxiety in other ways, that is great. I try strenuous exercise, meditation, counselling, yoga -- all these help. But sometimes medication is helpful too.

Wishing you all the best.

steved
Posts: 836
Joined: Apr 2004

The difficulty in our position is differentiating normal worry from clinical anxiety as it is normal to hold some worries and concerns considering what is going on in your life. If it is going on for weeks and really interfering with your functioning then it is time to do something about it. Exercise, meditation, relaxation all helps dn should be tried. Then talking therapies and meds are probably as good as each other and you should consider which suits you as an individual best. Therapy in the form of cognitive behavioural therapy is very good at helping you control the unhealthy thought processes that creep in eg the busy mind Tara talks about. Meds are good and the best are probably the antidepressants which work in anxiety even if you aren't depressed eg Zoloft. Xanax is one of the benzodiazepines so does stop the anxious feelings and is immediately calming but is addictive in the long term so if you are likely to use it for a fir while it may be best to avoid these types of meds- they are better for short lived anxiety states or using while waiting for antidepressants to kick (though they are very commonly used by people long term but i tryand avoid them).

Anyway, I think the important thing is to do something if it is creeping in and don't just ignore it.

Steve

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1528
Joined: Mar 2010

Lots of good suggestions here. I do have a therapist who has been supporting me through all of this. He allows that anxiety is normal, and works with me to deal better with it. Sometimes that means medication, but he also recommends meditation, exercise, and other ways to get out of your head.

Use whatever tools are helpful; don't be afraid of meds. Sometimes they can reel you in enough to be able to look at things from a different perspective, and deal better overall (and negating the need for meds.)

Do what you have to do, and don't judge yourself. There is no shame in needing help, whether a therapist, medications or other methods.

Maxiecat's picture
Maxiecat
Posts: 524
Joined: Jul 2012

I find that writing..either in a journal or just making lists of what is on my mind helps me to let things go. I Also find that keeping my hands busy doing something... For me it is my needlework... Helps me to distract my mind from those thoughts about what I am going through right now.

Alex

Ruffy7
Posts: 126
Joined: Sep 2011

It's given me some ideas/things to try. I think I will give meditation a try for a couple of weeks, I have a dr. appt on 9/20 so if I'm still having panic thoughts, I will talk with her about medication then. thanks for your suggestions and support! Hope everyone has a good weekend.

funnygurl
Posts: 17
Joined: Jul 2003

There is a antidepressant that has been found to stop hot flahses during menopause. I took it just before and after my colorectal surgery. I had been on herbal meds to control hot flashes for several years but had to stop because one was a blood thinner. I cannot do estrogen because of cancer risk in my family. I was on a low dose and it worked great. It is called venlafaxin.

RickMurtagh's picture
RickMurtagh
Posts: 530
Joined: Feb 2010

I hang around people a lot when I am anxious. Have meals with good friends - we cook them together. Play board games, cards or whatever strikes our fancy.

mskautz
Posts: 30
Joined: May 2012

I have my anxiety in the morning. Some people don't believe in medication, but I figure I have tons of chemicals being put in my system right now and anxiety is one thing I REFUSE to deal with at this time, so I take 1 mg. atavan a day. I do watch not to go above that as I have an addictive personality, I've been to rehab for xanax and it was hell to get off of it. A Dr. put me on it for pms years ago with as needed instructions and I ended up needing it 8 to 9 times a day. So Bless the person who did invent anti anxiety medicine but just remember to keep check on it.

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